POLICY

Tripura Tourism Policy










































Shri Biplab Kumar Deb Hon’ble Chief Minister, Tripura




MESSAGE


I am delighted to learn that the Department of Tourism is bringing out the “Tourism Policy 2020-2025”. I understand that tourism in Tripura has come a long way and it is one of main engines of economic development. The initiative taken by the Department like launching Paryatan Sahayak Prakalp scheme for promoting entrepreneurship, introducing tourist friendly activities like audio guides, guides, eco- friendly vehicles, development of destinations like Chabimura, Unkaoti, Matabari and Neermahal are praiseworthy. The impact of these initiatives will be visible in coming years and will help in transforming Tripura as one the most important tourist destination in India.

I hope that the Department will continue to play the perfect host to tourists from around the world by presenting the best we have as a destination and also at the same time preserving the tradition, culture, values and the interest of the people of Tripura.

I hope that the Tourism Policy will be a guiding document for all the stakeholders to promote Tripura as a premier tourist destination.

Wishing all success.



Biplab Kumar Deb



Shri Pranajit Singha Roy Hon’ble Minister, Tourism, Government of Tripura



MESSAGE


The tourism sector in Tripura has been growing consistently with lot of innovative activities being undertaken. However it has been observed that this growth has been in an unorganised manner with all the stakeholders of this sector working independently. It has been felt that all these stakeholders have to be brought together so that the vision of Tripura being a world class tourist destination is realised. This policy formulation is one of the steps towards achieving this vision.

Tourism in Tripura began very small and has been growing consistency. Today the state attracts more than 5 lakh domestic and foreign tourist every year and has created a mark for itself on the tourism map of the country. I expect the tourism sector to grow more. This policy aims at facilitating this growth and at the same time ensuring that this growth in accordance with the traditional and cultural values of the state. The Government also aims to provide an environment conducive to the growth of the tourism sector so that all the stakeholders especially private investors are encouraged. This policy document also aims to provide this framework of conducive working environment.

The policy document has been prepared after consultation with various stakeholders as at various stages and it focuses on identifying thrust areas for tourism in the State, the strategy to be adopted to make Tripura a world class destination, encouraging private partnerships, boosting local entrepreneurship and local community involvement in promoting tourism and all the same preserving the environment, heritage and culture of the state. I believe that this policy will strengthen the tourism sector of the State and will contribute not only for development of tourism but in overall economic development of the State.




Pranajit Singha Roy



Tourism Policy of Tripura



1. Preamble
Global Tourism Scenario:
A large number of people are travelling across the world- be it for work, pleasure or for enjoying the natural beauty or to understand the different cultures. As one of the most prominent human activities with positive outcomes, Tourism facilitates understanding of history, culture and traditions of our nation as well as of other countries. It promotes national integration, universal brotherhood and social integration. It offers opportunities for people to people exchange, generating employment opportunities, earning foreign exchange and this raising living standards.

According to the annual analysis quantifying the global economic and employment impact of travel and tourism in 185 countries, World Travel & Tourism Council’s (WTTC) research reveals that the sector has grown at 3.9% during 2018. It contributed to $8.8 trillion to the global economy and accounted for 319 million jobs, equivalent to one in every ten jobs.

Tourism Scenario in India
Tourism sector is one of the largest employment generators in India and plays a very significant role in promoting inclusive growth of the less-advanced sections of the society. According to India Tourism Statistics 2019 published by Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India, Foreign Tourist Arrivals in India in 2018was 10.56 million and witnessed annual growth of 5.2%. The estimated Foreign Exchange Earnings from tourism during 2018 was Rs.1, 94,892 Cr with annual growth rate of 9.6%1.Domestic tourist visits to all States and UTs in 2018 was 1854.9 Million registering annual growth rate of 11.9%. The Indian tourism industry is responsible for creating 23 million direct jobs (or 5.5% of total jobs in India) and
36.6 million direct and indirect jobs (or 8.7% of total jobs in India).

Tourism Scenario in Tripura:
Tripura is a hilly North-Eastern State of India blessed with natural rich topography, unique geographical location with tropic of cancer passing through its heart. The State, an abode of rich floral and faunal biodiversity, unique landscapes and moderate climate throughout the year has immense potential for tourism .Peaceful co-existence of nineteen indigenous tribes along with Bengali and Manipuri communities in the State, their diverse cultural streams and faiths, traditional art, music and festivals, beautiful handloom and handicrafts constitute irresistible charm as a tourist destination. It has spellbound rock cut sculptures of archaeological significance, Buddhist pilgrimage sites and the royal palaces that add to the charm.

During 2018-19, total 5,29,879 tourists visited Tripura including 1,12,955 foreign tourists.

1India Tourism Statistics 2019; Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India

The bulk of foreign tourists are from Bangladesh followed by tourists from USA, Canada and UK. Though in small numbers, tourists from Serbia, Sweden, Hungary and New Zealand visited Tripura in 2018-19. Tourist arrival registered 10% annual growth during 2018-19.

Evolution of Tourism sector in Tripura:
Tourism has been declared as an Industry in Tripura way back in1987. Realizing the potential of Tourism in the socio-economic development of the State, the State Government has set up Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Limited in 2008 for professional management and giving further impetus to tourism sector in the State. The Corporation has been registered in 2009 and since it’s functioning the revenue generation is continuously increasing indicating the opportunity for further expansion of this sector. Earlier Tourism Department was part of Information and Cultural Affairs Department but in 2013 a separate Tourism Directorate has been set up and it acts as an administrative department for the Tourism Corporation.

People’s outlook towards tourism in the state:
The sociable, art loving, ritualistic and festive character of local people is very conducive for tourism development in the State. People’s outlook towards tourism is positive and full of enthusiasm as this has potential for socio-economic development of the local communities. In fact, community participation in tourism development will be vital for success of tourism in Tripura.

2. Need for Tourism Policy in Tripura
Tourism continued to develop in an unorganised manner with various departments engaged in tourism development and facilitation but working in isolation with each other. Thus, a need for a joint and collaborative approach has been felt which would address tourism in a holistic manner through an integrated approach. There is an urgent need to consolidate all existing missions and plans, and together with strong participation of the tourism stakeholders to develop Tripura as preferred tourist destination. Considering ever growing and changing tourism industry, the policy shall provide guidance for bringing sustainability through inclusive growth, enhancing capacities of tourism stakeholders as well as for developing regulatory frameworks, which shall ensure quality experience for visitors to the State. At this stage of tourism development, the visitors’ perspectives also need to be factored in. Increasingly people are looking for authentic and distinctive experiences. Additionally, need to conserve the culture and nature has gained even more importance. This requires a comprehensive guiding document in the form of a policy for shaping Tripura’s tourism sector, which has been a long felt need in the state.

3. Vision
To promote sustainable tourism in Tripura, with emphasis on enhancing tourist experience, placing Tripura on tourism map of the world as one of the leading tourist destinations and also enabling economic and social development by linking tourism with the livelihood opportunities for local communities.

4. Mission

a. To make Tripura nationally and internationally acclaimed all-season Tourist destination.
b. To provide world class amenities and facilities to the tourists at all destinations and also provide well managed public amenities on the highways.
c. To highlight rich culture, heritage, wildlife, bio-diversity so as to provide unique experience of unexploited wonderland to the tourists.
d. To disseminate Tripura’s rich history, cultural and traditional aspects related to the ancient kingdom.
e. To facilitate involvement of private sector in establishment and management of tourism infrastructure.
f. To encourage local communities in management of tourist destinations as well as hosting activities like home-stay.
g. To generate employment opportunities for the local communities in sectors directly and indirectly linked with the tourism.

5. Guiding Principles
The tourism policy will be based on the following guiding principles:
a. Promotion of religious tourism based by developing places of worship of all faiths.
b. To promote eco-tourism in the State in collaboration with the Forest Department.
c. Undertake measures to provide best experience to the tourists in terms of information, logistics amenities, security and hospitality.
d. Establish active and coordinated participation of Government departments, voluntary organizations, the local community and other stakeholders of tourism sector.
e. Set up an institutional mechanism to promote private investment.
f. To create enabling framework for public-private partnerships in developing tourism products, projects and services.

6. Validity period of Policy
This policy shall remain in force for five years from the date of its issuance and projects started/established/ expanded operationally during such period shall qualify for benefits/exemption/concessions under the provision of this Policy. However, tourism projects established / expanded before the issuance of this policy shall be dealt with as per the provisions of the then prevailing policy.

7. Strategy
The following will be the strategy to be adopted to realise the vision of development of Tourism in Tripura:
A) Tourism Infrastructure Optimization:
The development of infrastructure is key for promoting tourism in the State. This will be taken up in the following ways.
i. Destination and Basic Infrastructure Development:
a. Destination development will be taken up through Central Govt and State Govt schemes. For each destination, a master plan will be developed, so that comprehensive development of amenities and facilities is ensured.

While planning the tourism destinations, Global Sustainable Tourism Council (GSTC) Criteria will be adhered by the Tourism Department, which is aimed to bring all stakeholders together to achieve sustainable tourism. GSTC Criteria serve as the global baseline standards for sustainability in travel and tourism. They are the result of a worldwide effort to develop a common language about sustainability in tourism. They are arranged in four pillars listed as sustainable management, Socio economic impacts, Cultural impacts and Environmental impacts (including consumption of resources, reducing pollution and conserving biodiversity and landscapes).
b. Department of Tourism (DoT) will collaborate with State Govt. Departments like Urban Development, PWD, Transport, Tripura State Electricity Corporation amongst others for continuous improvement and maintenance of basic infrastructure such as roads, drinking water, power, hygiene, transport, and solid waste management.
c. Priority areas will include setting up of hotels, restaurants, spas and resorts, tourist centres, parking areas, entertainment centres, amusement parks, ropeways, golf course, standardized budget accommodation etc.
d. New tourism destinations across the State will be identified and prioritized for development. Every year 1-2 destinations will be focused so that they can be developed in all respects for the tourists.
e. Efforts to include Tourism related aspects in action plan of all departments, particularly Forest, Handloom and Handicrafts, Information and Cultural Affairs for promotion of fairs and festivals of Tripura as listed in Annexure-1,Public Works Department, Industry (for tea tourism), Horticulture and other Departments of the State for holistic development.
f. Highest priority will be accorded to conservation and preservation of natural resources and beauty at eco-tourism destinations.

ii. Development of Way Side Amenities
a. Way side amenities will include setting up cafeteria, souvenir shop, parking facility, toilet complex etc on the major roads leading to tourist destinations.
b. The way side amenities will be developed on the government land along the National / State High ways or near the tourist locations, or developed in private land by the interested entrepreneur.
c. All way side amenities to carry out the brand name of Tripura Tourism.
d. In case of government land, the tourism department will ensure that land is allotted / leased to the Tourism Department with a provision to be managed by the Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Limited (TTDCL) and TTDCL will do the bid management for developing the way side amenities in that location. The land leasing will be taken up as per the guidelines formulated by the State Government from time to time.
e. In case of private land, the owner of the land or any other person after seeking due permission or arrangement with the owner of the land, can propose to set up way side amenities. The proposal will be given to Tourism Department, which will examine and provide approval. In this case the developer will require to pay a royalty or commission to State Government, as per the procedure laid down.
f. Way side amenities will be promoted under the Paryatan Sahayak Prakalp (Details included in Annexure II) scheme launched by Department of Tourism.



iii. Development of Tourist Circuits

a. Tourist Circuits linking Eco-Tourism, religious and entertainment places of interests to the tourist will be designed and developed.
b. Based on the profile of the tourists i.e. domestic and foreign, separate tourist packages will be developed and marketed in the suitable forums.
c. Special efforts will be made to develop international tourist circuit and promote in Bangladesh. The places involved will be Moynamoti in Bangladesh along with Pilak and Boxanagar in Tripura that can be developed as archaeological / Buddhist tourist circuits.
d. Similarly, there are 6 Shaktipeethas in Bangladesh which can be linked with Tripura Sundari Shaktipeetha in Tripura and developed into an international religious circuit.
e. Along these circuit routes, Home stay will be promoted to provide lifestyle and cultural experience of Tripura to the tourists.
B) Improving Connectivity:
i. Efforts would be taken to ensure direct flights from major cities to Agartala.
ii. Operationalisation of Kailashahar Airport, will help to reach Unakoti and Jampui Hills tourists destinations conveniently.
iii. There are 22 helipads in Tripura. Therefore, helicopter tourism can be promoted and “Tripura Hawai Darshan” will be started by using the services of Pawan Hans every weekend.
iv. The Tourism Department will also work with the Indian Railways and IRCTC for providing affordable tourist packages.
v. Tourism Department will work with the NHAI, PWD Department and Rural Development department to improve the connectivity to Tourist Destinations on priority.
vi. The Tourism Department in coordination with the concerned departments of the State, will take steps to ensure proper hygienic conditions and to prevent the exploitation of tourists on national and state highways and at tourist places.
vii. Police and Highway Patrol to be ensured on all major state and national highways connecting major tourism destinations in co-ordination with Home Department and Highway Authorities

C) Human Resource Development:

i. In service sector like tourism, availability of skilled staff is essential for delivery of hospitality services professionally. The Government will invest in human resource development so that the managerial and technical skill is made available with the State. Tourism Department will facilitate the operationalisation of Hotel Management Institute at Anandnagar at the earliest
ii. All the personnel directly and indirectly engaged in the tourism sector will be trained in hospitality related aspects with assistance from National level apex institutes-like IITM, IIFM, IHMs, etc. DoT shall put emphasis on youth, women, under privileged and disadvantaged sections of the society. Skill trainings and Capacity Building workshops shall be organized to make them employable in the tourism sector.
iii. Professional guides will be trained, certified and deployed at tourist locations and at arrival points.
iv. Service related training will be provided periodically to all the registered home stay owners, restaurant staff and hoteliers and their staff so that the tourists enjoy warm hospitality during their stay in the State.
v. Feedback and 3rd Party Skill Assessment of Trainings provided and Trainees after completion of trainings shall be carried out.
vi. DoT will also encourage Hoteliers/Travel Operators/Tour Agents to induct trained and certified guides/workforce for better absorption in the tourism sector.

vii. A pool of consultants / experts shall be empanelled to provide necessary training like general etiquettes, English speaking and other languages, cooking, nature guides, heritage guides, resort operations etc as per the demand of the industry.
viii. Convergence with Central government schemes like Hunar se Rozgar Yojana of Ministry of Tourism and other ministries shall be ensured.
ix. Licensing and certification of tour guides shall be ensured to standardize their services and accreditation of travel agents shall be promoted
x. Tourism sector institutions of the State shall be encouraged to include sustainable development strategies as part of their curriculum.
xi. Emphasis on capacity building of Local Communities:
a. Special incentive scheme “Paryatan Sahayak Prakalp” has been adopted to promote entrepreneurship and people participation in development of tourism related infrastructure & services in Tripura, where subsidised interest loans upto Rs. 5 Lakhs are given to youths.
b. Transparent guidelines and standard procedures will be laid down to allow local communities to participate in the management of the tourist destinations and services.
c. Active participation of local bodies will be ensured by sensitizing them towards tourism.
d. In promoting the local cuisine, costume, art, handicraft and local heritage etc, involvement of local communities is crucial and it will be encouraged.
e. Retail outlets for local products, arts, crafts, cuisine, etc will be encouraged wherever feasible
f. Community kitchens and cluster of public conveniences at rural locations will be encouraged largely through private entrepreneurs/SHGs

D) Marketing & Promotion:

i. Social media and digital media will be used widely for marketing the tourist destinations. This will be key for advertisement and promotion strategy.
ii. Along with this, destination and package wise new brochures, posters will be printed and short films on destinations will be developed.
iii. One key area for marketing and promotion is the Information centres situated in airport, railway station and integrated check posts. The existing information centers will be upgraded and new such information centers will be planned in major airports and railways stations.
iv. The participation in leading national and international tourism fairs will be taken up strategically so as to market the tourist destinations in a better way.
v. Familiarization tours of the leading tour operators of the country and overseas will be taken up in major tourist destinations so that they are marketed well in the State.
vi. Road shows in key national and international markets will be taken up to promote the tourist destinations
vii. Signage’s of the international class will be installed on the national, state and at the important tourist highways and stations.
viii. Destination Management Organizations (DMO) will be promoted locally, first at Agartala for promoting destinations in concerted manner for standardization of services. DMOs are non-government professional body that market a destination by attracting right quantum of tourists and synergizes activities at local tourist destinations. Responsibilities of a DMO include:
• Facilitate reservations for villas, resorts, hotels, homestays
• Provide travel management and guides
• Act as local partners for group and event organizers

• Acts as receptive agents for travel agents, tour operators
• Training and capacity building activities for local communities
• Tourism products and business development
ix. DoT shall undertake initiatives to develop Coffee table books, Documentaries and knowledge material for tourists. These will focus on diversity of Tripura such as its flora, fauna, heritage, festivals and local culture covering tourism destinations
x. A 5 year calendar of events across Tripura will be developed including 5 signature events that will be organized annually. Indigenous products will be promoted as part of the event calendar
xi. The advertisement will be taken up by the Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Limited (TTDCL) as accordingly approved by the board of TTDCL from time to time.
xii. Emphasis towards attracting International Tourists: It has been observed that international tourists prefer visiting places with rich cultural heritage, eco-friendly locations and the locations that offer them unique experience. As Tripura has all these types of locations, steps should be taken to attract international tourists. As the first step to attract international tourists, a detailed strategy will be created for top 5 visiting countries to catalyse the demand of inbound tourism including strategic link up with overseas tourism boards.
a. Making linkages with the international circuits of religious and cultural significance and marketing the tourist destinations.
b. Efforts will be taken to ensure travel, accommodation bookings and transit seamless and comfortable to the tourists.
c. All efforts will be made to access national as well international tourist markets for marketing, branding, promotion of local Tourism Products.
d. Comprehensive feedback mechanism of tourist experience shall be developed.

E) Attracting Private Investments:
i. To encourage establishment of tourism projects through private investment, land bank at suitable locations will be identified and created by the tourism department.
ii. As tourism has been accorded the status of Industry, the, Incentives, Subsidies/Concessions will be made available to augment the establishment of various tourism facilities like hotels and resorts in the State, like to any other industry.
iii. Private transport operators will be linked to tourism areas and encouraged to provide quality transport services.
iv. To encourage MICE (Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions) Tourism in the State, establishment and management of convention centres with private investment will be promoted.
v. To provide quality accommodation to tourists in the state, establishment of star category hotels with private investment will be encouraged.




F) Safety & Security

i. A disaster management plan will be created for major tourist destinations to brace for any eventuality. A dedicated helpline number will be launched exclusively for the tourists.

ii. To provide safeguard for tourist, tourist police / private security persons will be deployed at various locations. An assessment will be made regarding the requirement of the police personnel / private security guards and they will be sensitised accordingly.
iii. Tourism Department shall liaison with mobile operators to ensure efficient connectivity for all tourism destinations in the state especially far-flung areas
iv. Tourists will be provided with information with the better use of information technology and communication mediums. Through mobile based applications they will be provided tourism information.
v. Tourist destinations will be equipped with modern telecommunication facilities and ICT.
vi. Enabling appropriate accessibility for physically challenged will be promoted at key tourist destinations.

8. Thrust Areas of Tourism in Tripura
Eco Tourism
Eco-Tourism is a new concept, developed around the idea of travelling to places of natural beauty, moving around and staying at places bestowed with nature for few days. It involves participation of local communities in overall economic development of area, learning environment friendly way of life and support conservation efforts while observing nature and wildlife. Tripura has immense scope for eco-tourism. The State is virtually free from industrial pollution. Its green forests, blue hills, enchanting rivers are basis on which eco- friendly tourism can be developed through:
a. Tripura is an ideal place for developing eco-tourism activities like jungle safaris, trekking, rock climbing, forest trails, nature walks, angling, camping etc. All these activities are to be conducted in a manner that promotes awareness of the environment and helps maintain the ecological balance.
b. Wildlife Tourism is an integral part of Eco Tourism. At present there are 04 (four) Sanctuaries, 02 (two) National Parks. Department of Toursim proposes to work actively with the Wildlife Wing of the Forest Deptt. to further develop and improve wildlife parks/zoos, bird watching towers and other public utility services for the facility of the tourists. Initiatives shall be taken in collaboration with the Forest Department to preserve/protect these areas from mass tourism flows and development.
c. Development of Lakes and wetlands is also part of eco-tourism. The department will take steps in coordination with the Forest Department to maintain and enhance their beauty by undertaking development in an integrated manner.
d. Policy for Eco-tourism in Forest & Wildlife areas has been outlined by Government of India. It will be followed as and where applicable.
e. Forest Department will also make an endeavour to declare some areas for eco-friendly recreation.
f. Creation of infrastructural facilities like good quality tents, cottages-on-stilts with provisions for ethnic food and other logistics will be taken up in the eco tourism sites along with river cruise, water sports etc.
g. Dumbur lake will be developed into world class destination with the financial assistance of the Central Government / Externally Aided Project in order to develop activities like water

sports, angling, bird watching, setting up of house boats, development of artificial beaches etc.
h. Nature Camps, Eco-friendly accommodation, trekking and nature walks, visitor interpretation centers amongst others shall be promoted.
i. Guides and naturalists shall be trained and certified in coordination with the Forest Department.
j. TTDCL will conduct feasibility study to create cycle trails near selected rivers, natural parks and sanctuaries to discover natural and cultural aspects of the region.
k. TTDCL will create interpretation center to promote edutainment in forest sector.

Adventure Tourism:
a. There is a need to make comprehensive adventure tourism promotion plan for the State by laying down the regulatory framework for enforcement of safety standards.TTDCL shall set out eligibility criteria for entities aspiring to enter the Adventure Tourism segment to safeguard the tourists from the perils of the various adventure tourism activities
b. For the promotion of adventure sports, the TTDCL will identify the various adventure sports activities that can be taken up at different location and they will be developed in public private partnership mode. As the first step, TTDCL will work in close coordination with Adventure Tour Operators & Associations to frame resource mapping for developing potential adventure tourism activities.
c. To attract private investment in Adventure tourism, TTDCL can offer land on lease or license. Procedure to offer the land on lease shall be followed in accordance with the guidelines issued by the State Government from time to time.
d. As training and safety standards are key to adventure sports, training on different aspects of the adventure sports to the youths, will be facilitated by TTDCL.
e. TTDCL will make provision for quality equipment needed for adventure activities. These shall be made available in the nearest tourism department office.
f. TTDCL will market and promote adventure destinations and expeditions in domestic and international platforms.

Spiritual Tourism:
a. A detailed infra-gap assessment shall be carried out at major pilgrimage destinations to address the key infrastructure issues in collaboration with Temple Trusts.
b. Service Level Agreements for maintaining cleanliness and hygiene with professional agencies in the domain shall be undertaken.
c. Funding from CSR shall also be explored for solid waste management, provisioning of tourist amenities etc at prominent pilgrimage destinations.
d. Smart solutions will be promoted in collaboration with Temple Trusts to implement services like Wi-Fi, CCTV cameras, display screens, Prasad vending cash cards, visitor management amongst others.
e. With the help of local bodies regular cleanliness drives shall be ensured at religious destinations.
f. TTDCL shall create Tourist Facilitation Centres to enhance tourists experience at religious destinations. These centres shall ensure centralized booking facilities, tourist information, food etc.

g. Tourism Department plans to develop Tripura Sundari Matabari Temple as world class tourist destination in consultation with the Mandir Trust.Along with tourist amenities, Tourism Department will also develop Ropeway from Udaipur Railway Station upto Matabari temple, in PPP mode. This ropeway will become a major tourist attraction.
h. Tourism department in collaboration with other States, will market Tripura Sundari Temple as part of shaktipeeth circuit. These efforts will be especially with Assam, so that all tourist visiting Kamakhya can also visit Tripura Sundari temple.
i. An annual seven days Kharchi Mela at Old Agartala Chaturdas temple during the month of July has come to be as known as Mahamillan utsav of the tribal & non-tribal, where lakhs of people and Sadhus congregate. This shall be highlighted in publicity campaigns in domestic tourist circuits with an appropriate tagline giving forceful punch to spiritual tourism.
j. The Buddhist circuit in Tripura comprising Benuban Vihar, Mahamuni and Nabincharra will be promoted, especially in South East Asia to attract tourists. TTDCL will conduct road shows in the South East Asian countries to promote Buddhist Tourism.
k. With similar focus, the centres of other faiths also will be developed and promoted in the relevant market segments.

Ethnic Tourism:
a. Tripura is a unique in it’s cultural and ethnic diversity. The State is a home land to 19 ethnic tribes and groups, each having its own cultural heritage, life customs, religious beliefs, language, food habits, folk songs and dances which are rich and varied.
b. TTDCL shall conduct Social Impact Assessment in collaboration with the Department of Tribal Welfare and Department of Forest for development of eco-ethnic tourism activities in due consultation with representatives from tribal communities. This will ascertain their willingness to participate in eco-ethnic tourism activities.
c. A detailed resource mapping study shall be undertaken by analyzing the market potential of eco ethnic tourism
d. Only activities and facilities having least impact on the natural resources and the tribal culture shall be permitted.
e. Marketing strategies shall be developed for promotion of eco ethnic tourism activities based on sound market research and segmentation analysis and make wide use of electronic, print and cyber media.
f. Destinations thus identified shall be developed in accordance with the carrying capacity of the region, and also ensured that the activities causes minimal disturbance to the social diaspora and natural ecosystem
g. Tourism infrastructure for promoting eco ethnic tourism activities shall be environment friendly, low impact aesthetic architecture, including solar energy, waste recycling, rainwater harvesting, natural cross-ventilation and proper sewage disposal and merging with the surrounding habitat.
h. TTDCL shall work in close coordination with Tripura Handloom & Handicrafts Development Corporation to promote the tribal products
i. Accreditations like Craft Mark, Geographical Indication (GI) shall be promoted for the products developed by the tribal people, to adhere to the principals of fair trade.

j. TTDCL will identify villages to develop the traditional architecture and tourism related infrastructure.
k. TTDCL will also identify in the existing tourist locations and also new locations to provide the experience of local cuisine, handloom and handicrafts, art and dance forms. Efforts will be undertaken to form Village tourism Committees (VTC) in such tourist locations for effective management of tourism enterprises. SHGs of villages shall be promoted to work as supporting VTCs.
l. appropriate synergies would be ensured with financial institutions to provide funds for renovating the rural homes so as to ensure attractive, clean and comfortable stay of visiting tourists.
m. Some of the identified activities for promotion under eco-ethnic theme are as under:

 Rural Immersion Programmes including festivals and folklore
 Rural Homestays
 Local cuisine
 Handicraft development
 Participation in tribal rituals
 Tribal Sports
 Village walks and Jungle Treks, Bird watching etc.

Film Tourism:
a. The objective will be to project and establish, Tripura as an ideal shooting destination, and for this an exhaustive publicity campaign shall be taken up by the tourism department.
b. Film Tourism is an area which can be explored in Tripura, as till date no major films were shooted here. To promote film tourism, the producers need to be given incentives so that they find a reason to do shooting here.
c. Also film producers face various difficulties in co-ordinating with different departments while asking permission for local level shooting. Tourism Department will co-ordinate with these departments to obtain the legal mandatory permissions needed for film producers.
This service can be extended to the concerned producer company on best effort basis
d. It will also be required to declare Director Tourism as the sole authority for granting all type of permissions related to film shootings and the fee thus be collected by the Tourism department could be further remitted to the concerned departments.
e. In addition to this the department will invite investment from private parties for setting up of the film cities, studios and hiring of filming equipment etc. for which govt. land could be provided on PPP basis.
f. Organize familiarization tours for major production houses in India and across the world for key tourist destinations in Tripura.
g. To ensure safety and security to the film makers a separate film shooting wing will be formed in collaboration with the Home Department and respective District Tourism Officers on the concerned area.

h. TTDCL shall lease out various instruments available for film shooting in close coordination with other departments like Education, Culture, amongst others.

i. TTDCL in consultation with the production houses will retain film shooting sets/structures which can have touristic value.

Tea & Golf Tourism:
a. There are 54 Tea Estates in Tripura. Coordination with the management of the tea gardens can effectively do a lot in promoting tea tourism in the State. Tourism Department will engage and persuade some of the willing tea gardens to be a partner in the tea tourism packages. The quantum of land allowed and activities permitted shall be as per the provisions of TLR& LR Act as amended from time to time.
b. Traditional houses in Tea Estates could be converted into home stays wherein the tourists could enjoy the beauty right from tea plantations upto tea packaging. Many of these tea gardens can be developed to have golf courses.
c. TTDCL will also organise Tea Festivals in consultation with the Tea Board.

Wellness Tourism:
a. A detailed market plan shall be developed to promote medical & wellness tourism in association with concerned stakeholders including reputed medical institutions and practitioners, medical service providers, amongst others.
b. Focus would be towards offering medical as well as wellness facilities to the rural/sub- urban regions of the State by developing seamless connectivity to the destinations.
c. TTDCL shall also include these centres in it packages and promote them at national and international platforms like travel marts, road shows etc.
d. Apart from this Tourism Department also proposes to develop ayurvedic spa /health resorts in association with the private sector at various locations in the State.
e. Training the youth in Panchkarma and other therapies will also be undertaken by tourism department through concerned departments.

Heritage Tourism:
a. Heritage zones will be earmarked around site like Unakoti, Udaipur, Pilak, Baxanagar, etc and accordingly master plans will be developed for comprehensive tourism development of the region. To improve the maintenance of these destinations efforts will be taken to create ownership among locals. Feasibility of creating heritage trails will be also considered.
b. Greater coordination with Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) will be ensured and all efforts will be taken to make “UNAKOTI”- a World Heritage Site.
c. To increase length of stay of tourists’ development of tourist villages near existing heritage attractions will be encouraged by engaging local communities.

Border Tourism:
a. TTDCL will encourage tourism activities along the bordering areas of the state. Intensive marketing and promotional activities will be adopted to increase tourist visits from neighbouring states.

b. Access to infrastructure to these destinations shall be developed by collaborating with other state agencies to enable smooth commute.

Arts, Crafts and Souvenirs:
a. Promotion of local art and culture, generation of income and employment as it is a major component of tourism policy. The tourism department will endeavour to encourage the development of souvenir industry linked to local crafts, events and places which would promote a distinctive image of the State both within and outside the State. The private sector will also be encouraged to patronize and promote local folk, culture and crafts for the visiting tourists.
b. Development of souvenir industry including standardised packaging is of utmost importance for which leading institutions and voluntary organisations in the country like NID, NIFT, IIPD, NCDPD etc will be actively engaged.

9. Role of Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd:
The role of Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd (TTDCL) for implementation of tourism policy is important. The role of the Corporation will be as follows;
i. While providing tourism services, the TTDCL shall play a crucial role in establishment, expansion, marketing and advertisement of tourism related infrastructure and services.
ii. TTDCL shall identify new areas for development of Tourism destinations and facilities through public and private investment.
iii. TTDCL shall focus on management of core tourist services, and as per the need will be allowed to hand over its units to private sector for operation under management agreement or on a long-term lease.
iv. To resolve issues related to tourism promotion, management and operations, effective steps shall be taken up in co-ordination with stakeholders of tourism industry.
v. Tourism projects shall be established and appropriate support to investors to invest in new undeveloped areas with tourism potential shall be streamlined.
vi. As and when required TTDCL can expand its units and develop new areas of tourism through profits realized.
vii. TTDCL shall take up up-gradation and maintenance of tourist lodges and other assets regularly to provide better facilities to the tourists.
viii. TTDCL shall set up a Project Monitoring Unit (PMU) for taking up intense promotional activities, attracting private investments, investor facilitation, providing incentives and subsidies to investors.

10. Tourism Projects
The following activities will be treated as tourism projects to avail various facilities and subsidies as applicable under the Schemes of the State and Central Governments. The definitions of these projects will be updated as per the guidelines issued by Ministry of Tourism, Government of India and Department of Tourism, Government of Tripura, from time to time:
• Hotel (Star, Deluxe and Standard Class).
• Health Farm/Resort/Health and Wellness Resort.
• Resort, Camping Site and Fixed tenting units.
• Wayside Amenities.
• Heritage Hotel.
• Facilities for Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Exhibitions (MICE).
• Museum/Aquarium/Theme Parks.

• Bed and Breakfast /Home Stay Units.
• Golf Course.
• Rope way.
• Water Park and Water Sports.
• Amusement Park.
• Adventure tourism.
• Cruise Tourism and House Boats.
• Film studio and development of infrastructure and installation of equipment for film making.
• Sound and light show/ Laser show.
• Other activities related to tourism as notified by Tourism Department of Central / State Government, from time to time.

11. Investor Facilitation and Promoting Private partnerships
i. Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Limited (TTDCL) shall function as the nodal agency for investor facilitation under this policy.
ii. The engagement of private partners for suitable tourism projects will be according to the guidelines issued by the State Government from time to time.
iii. For Investment Promotion in Tourism, Corporation shall work in coordination with Directorate of Industries and Tripura Industrial Development Corporation also to provide permissions, incentives and subsidies for the enterprises and projects in Tourism sector.
iv. At State level, for implementation of Investment promotion activities, for granting of permissions / registration / no objections / licenses to Investor of establishment of Tourism Projects, Deputy Managing Director, TTDCL shall be nominated as the single point of contact.
v. The Deputy MD shall get resolved all such Investment related proposals in tourism sector through the committees constituted at State and District level and coordinate with various departments for necessary approvals.
vi. Private projects where forest/revenue clearances are needed will be dealt on priority within a specified time not exceeding 30 days.

12. Planning for Future Developments
Tourism shall plan holistically for all its future tourism developments, in order to achieve the same the following practices shall be adopted:

i. Tourism Roadmap
The department shall undertake the exercise to create a long-term tourism roadmap of the state. In doing so TTDCL shall engage consultants, as required, to prepare a comprehensive tourism roadmap covering the detailed resource mapping exercises of potential and new tourism destinations. Thus, TTDCL can prioritize these destinations and make action plans for implementation.
TTDCL shall also engage experienced operations/experts in various domains to get domain specific information on various destinations. One of the scope of services under the tourism roadmap exercise will be identify potential tourism projects. TTDCL shall use the Tourism Roadmap while preparing its own annual tourism budgets and adhere to the roadmap for seamless integration of the action plan.

ii. Tourism Investment Summits
The department along with TTDCL shall organize tourism investment summits as an annual affair, as it brings down the investors under one roof and facilitates the investments in tourism domain. Secondly, it is an excellent platform for the State Tourism Department to showcase various projects that are on offer for private sector participation.

iii. Convergence of Tourism Projects
The department shall ensure that it benefits from various schemes that are centrally sponsored for tourism development and related works. Some of the schemes targeted towards the same are Swadesh Darshan, PRASAD, HRIDAY, AMRUT, Swachh Bharat Mission, Skill Development Mission etc.
TTDCL shall apply under the mentioned schemes and gain funds for tourism development. Apart from these, TTDCL shall also make a framework to utilize CSR related funds at tourism destinations.
TTDCL shall also encourage projects which are green and uses renewable energy as practice by providing them faster approvals and simultaneously providing special incentives to be decided on case to case basis.

13. Incentives and Subsidy for Tourism Projects
The State Government has granted the status of Industry to the Tourism Sector in 1987. The incentives and subsidies as promoted by the industry department and as detailed out in Tripura Industrial Investment Promotion Incentive Scheme 2017 and subsequent amendments will be applicable to the projects undertaken for tourism department.

14. Allotment of land for establishing Tourism Projects through private investment
i. The State Government can make land available for establishment and development of all types of Tourism Units as per the existing procedures.
ii. All Development Authorities, Agartala Municipal Corporation, Municipality Councils, Tripura Housing Board, Nagar Panchayat, Gram Panchayat, Forest, Industry Department and District Collectors would be requested to identify suitable land for the establishment of Tourism units, as per the requirement.
iii. After demarcation and ensuring the land is encumbrance free and other issues, and after recommendation by the land allotment committees, the identified land will be sent by the concerned District Magistrate and Collector, to the revenue department for allotment / lease in favour of Tourism department.

iv. Land so identified shall be set apart and reserved for tourism units. Information of such Land Bank would be made available on the Website of concerned Body/ District Collector/ Revenue Department and on Tourism department Website.

v. Such identified Government land / land on which assets are erected and are transferred to the Tourism Department would be developed as per prevalent guidelines of the Government.

vi. Tourism department through TTDCL will put the land to the identified use, either directly or through leasing /licensing out such land in and open, fair and transparent manner for investments, operations and management by the private investor.

vii. Similarly any assets like heritage properties or any other assets that can be promoted under tourism, will be taken up by Tourism Department and operationalised through TTDCL.

viii. The procedure for leasing out of Government land allotted / leased to Tourism Department will be according to the guidelines issued by the State Government from time to time.

15. Constitution of State/District Tourism Promotion Council:
i. State Tourism Promotion Council (STPC)
a. The State Tourism Promotion Council shall be established at the State Level. This Council under the Chairmanship of Hon’ble Chief Minister, shall be constituted with nominated stakeholders in tourism sector.
b. The State Tourism Council shall be empowered to take decision for various schemes and projects emanating out of the State Tourism Policy.
c. The Council shall meet as and when necessary and at least once in a quarter
d. The functions of STPC shall be as follows;
• Review the implementation and effectiveness of the State Tourism policy and undertake necessary amendments if required to achieve the objectives of the policy
• Recommend enabling institutional structure necessary to implement this policy including establishing effective single window clearance system
• Prioritize the current projects and review implementation targets
• Advise on interdepartmental coordination on matters related to this policy
• Invite industry stakeholders to understand their challenges and adopt suitable measures to mitigate the same
• Establish a governance structure for regular management of each major destination/ tourism asset
• Strategy to devise Brand, Communication and Promotion plan
• Strategy towards being an enabler through PPP projects
• Unlock Tourism inhibitors like land acquisition, etc.

ii. District Tourism Promotion Council
a. In various parts of State, cultural and tourism centric events are organized at local levels. Therefore, at each district level, District Tourism Promotion Council (DTPC) shall be constituted under the chairmanship of the District Magistrates and Collectors.
b. While the State Tourism Council will drive the policy initiatives, the roll out of specific initiatives will reside with District Tourism Councils for smooth implementation of tourism projects at district level. This is essentially a decentralized arrangement, where local government engage with industry partners to promote tourism.
c. Following are the key responsibilities:
• Clear planning covering locations, events, etc.
• Coordinate fund allocation by agencies as per budgets
• Monitor implementation of the projects and assistance to private stakeholder to facilitate investments
• Planning, Implementation and Regulation at the tourist sites in greater detail as set out by STC.
• Identify land parcels for tourism development in the district
• Nodal agency for ideas and information related to tourism at the district
• Develop economically viable Tourism Projects for development
• License, regulate and accreditation of tourism ventures as per the Tourism Department guidelines
• Encourage/facilitate travel writers, media and bloggers for promoting places of tourist interest in the district
• Prepare the local event list at the district level
• Facilitate convergence of resources of various agencies for the development of tourism infrastructure& development and updation of tourism information for districts
• Organize and facilitate training programs for the benefit of stakeholders in the tourism industry
• Facilitate the formation of local tourism destination development bodies with local community participation for development of tourism assets
• Facilitate and support the development of eco-tourism societies
• Promote the development of tourism master plans for each district
• Skill profiling of local population to create lists for guides, freelancers, photographers, home-stay addresses and develop a tourism service provider database

16. Tourism Excellence Awards
Annual Tourism Awards will be instituted for recognition of excellence in tourism products and services as also for contribution to the growth of tourism in the State. The various categories are mentioned below:
a. Best Entrepreneur in Tourism
b. Best Woman Entrepreneur in Tourism
c. Best Start-up in Tourism
d. Most Innovative Tourism Project
e. Best ICT-enabled Tourism Project
f. Best-maintained Tourism Asset (Swachhta-Puraskar)

g. Recognition to Hotels, Tour Operators, Agents
h. Green Tourist operator taken up eco-friendly tourism measures. (Significantly contributing to the growth of Tourism in the State).

17. Implementation of Tourism Policy

In order to make available required facilities/ rebate/ license etc. to tourism projects concerned departments shall issue necessary guidelines, notifications or amend the rules. In this context, if difference of opinion arises or difficulties emerge, then matters including clarifications/ explanations / disputes shall be placed before the Empowered Committee comprising of following members under the Chairmanship of Chief Secretary for resolution:-
• Principal Chief Conservator of Forests
• Principal Secretary, Finance
• Principal Secretary, Tourism
• Principal Secretary, Information and Cultural Affairs
• In-charge Secretary of department related with the case
• Director Tourism , shall be the Member Secretary.

Committee may take decision in accordance with the prevailing policy and the decision thus taken shall be final and binding on all concerned and its compliance shall be mandatory for the concerned department. Committee shall discharge all the responsibilities mandated under this policy.


*****


A. LIST OF FAIRS & FESTIVALS OF TRIPURA

ANNEXURE - I


Fairs & Festivals Venue & Time
Pous Sankranti Fair At Tirthamukh every year in January
Pilak Tourism & Archaeological Festival At Pilak every year in Non.-Dec.
Rajarshi Festival At Bhubaneshwari Temple every year in the
month of May.
Ashokastami Festival At Unakoti every year in April
Goria Festival Month of Baisakh (April) for 7 days
Buddha Purnima Festival Every year in the month of May at Udayan
Buddha Vihar, Lord Buddda Temple &Mahamuni Pagoda.
Kharchi Festival At ChaturdashDevta Temple every year in July
Boat Race Festival At Rudrasagar Lake &Gandacherra every year in
August
Chabimura Festival At Chabimura every year in
September/October
Dumboor Festival Every year in October/ November at
Gandachara
Diwali Festival At Matabari every year in October /
November
Neermahal Tourism Festival At Neermahal every year in December

B. TOURIST INFORMATION CENTRE AND CORPORATE OFFICE ADDRESS
1. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Head Office of Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd,Swetmahal, Palace Compound, Agartala, Tripura, Phone: +913812325930
2. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Agartala Maharaja Bir Bikram Kishore Manikya Airport, Tripura Phone: +913812342394
3. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Akhaura Integrated Check Post, Agartala, Tripura,
4. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Netaji Subhash Chandra International Airport, Kolkata, West Bengal, Phone +91 9432985706/ +91 9038244957.
5. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Tripura Bhawan, 1- Pretoria Street, Kolkata-71, West Bengal, Phone:+9133 22825703/ 0624/ 2297, E-mail:- tripuratourism.kol@gmail.com.
6. Tripura Tourist Information Centre, Tripura Bhawan, Salt Lake, Kolkata, West Bengal, Phone: +913323340213.
7. CORPORATE OFFICE:Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd, Swetmahal, Palace Compound, Agartala, Tripura West, Pin – 799001, Phone: +913812325930, e-mail: tripuratourism09@rediffmail.com,Website:www.tripuratourism.gov.in


*****

ANNEXURE - II
GOVERNMENT OF TRIPURA TOURISM DEPARTMENT
********
Guidelines for the “Interest subvention scheme” to promote entrepreneurship in tourism sector.
1. Background:
a. Tripura has very high potential to become a great tourist destination in the North East India. There are many tourist locations in the State that are not well known across the country and there are many more tourist locations that are yet to be explored. In order to enable the tourism sector in Tripura to grow, the best strategy is to involve all the stakeholders and simultaneously create an eco-system to increase the number of stakeholders.
b. Hence the scheme ‘’PARYATAN SAHAYAK PRAKALP’’ on interest subvention scheme for tourism sector is being proposed to promote the people involvement in tourism sector in Tripura.
2. Objective:
The objective of the scheme is to promote entrepreneurship in tourism sector by providing interest subsidy to eligible persons to enable them to take up activities in tourism sector. Through this scheme, it is intended to facilitate the access of loans to tourism related projects and upon successful repayments, as an incentive, the interest component will be borne by the State Government.
3. Details of the Scheme:
a. The interest subvention scheme is to promote entrepreneurship in Tourism Sector.
b. This scheme will be applicable only to loans taken up for tourism related activities, up to maximum of Rs. 5.00 lakh per loan per person.
c. Bank may extend loan beyond Rs. 5.00 lakh as per project cost and security offering within their norms. But, the support from the Government on interest subvention will be extended only upto the loan of Rs. 5.00 lakh.
d. If the borrower repays the loan regularly to the bank then as an incentive at the end of every 6 months the interest component will be paid back to the beneficiary.
e. The interest subvention will be paid for a period of first 5 years only calculated from the day of sanction of the loan. After that for the remaining period of the loan, the interest will be paid by the borrower.
f. The amount of interest repaid under the scheme will be calculated at 8% interest rate or actual interest rate, whichever is lower.
g. Borrower will contribute 5% of the project cost as margin.
h. The following projects can be taken up under this scheme
a. Home stay facilities
b. Way side amenities – pay and use toilets, restaurant, dhabas etc.
c. Boats – Speed boats, house boats, shikara etc
d. Water / adventure sport facilities
e. Promoting heritage tourism, eco-tourism etc
f. Managing yoga / ayurvedic facilities near tourist locations
g. Eco friendly transport near the tourist zones
h. Any other innovative projects related to tourism sector

4. Eligibility Criteria:
a. Individuals above 18 years of age upto the age of 50 years will be eligible for this scheme.
b. Preference will be given to unemployed youths and to those who have completed graduation or diploma in Hotel Management or Travel and Tourism or undergone any skill development in Tourism related skills under the Prime Minister Kushal Vikash Yojana (PMKVY) or any others schemes will also get preference during the course of selection.
c. Only one person from a family will be eligible for this scheme.
d. Only if the borrower pays regular EMI, then the interest component will be repaid by the Government. If he/she defaults the payment for three consecutive months, as verified by the banker, then he/she will automatically cease to be the beneficiaries of the scheme.
e. The borrower shall not be entitled to receive subvention facility in case of becoming a loan defaulter and unable to repay the loan within loan repayment schedule fixed by the bank.
5. Procedure:
a. The scheme will be implemented by Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd (TTDCL).
b. Applications will be received on continuous basis throughout the year, through online portal (www.tripuratourism.gov.in).
c. All the applications received in previous month will be examined by the committee on 10th of next month and if 10th is a holiday then on the immediate next working day.
d. A committee with representatives of Industry department and Bankers will be formed to examine the projects. The members of the Committee will be as follows
• MD,TTDCL :- Chairperson
• Representative of Industry Department : - Member
• Lead District Manager (West Tripura) : - Member
• RM, State Bank of India : - Member
• RM, UBI : - Member
• MD, Tripura Gramin Bank : - Member
• MD,TSCB : - Member
• Any other invitee members as per the requirement.
e. The committee will assess the project proposal both from the suitability to the overall tourism development plan of the State and also for its financial soundness.
f. The such recommended applications will be forwarded to the banks for sanctioning of the loan. The respective banks after sanction of the loan will inform TTDCL.
g. After the sanction and loan disbursal, the bankers will keep a record of repayment of the loans. All such loans where repayments are regular, interest component of these loans will be calculated and forwarded to TTDCL, once in every six month i.e. as on 1st July and 1st January. TTDCL will then pay the interest of all such regular repaying loans to the respective beneficiary as per the details provided by the bank subject to maximum of 8% of interest rate.

h. There will be periodical supervision of the Tourism Department on the scheme and on the projects undertaken for necessary facilitation or handholding.

6. Loan Tracking:
The loan tracking will be undertaken by the concerned Bank disbursing the loan. The Lead Bank shall maintain a detailed statement of loan repayments on the basis of quarterly information furnished by the concerned Banks. A Nodal Officer will be appointed from the side of TTDCL and one each from the Banks participating in the Scheme for coordination.
7. Repayment of loans:
The loans are to be repaid to the concerned Bank disbursing the loan as per its terms and conditions. The interest subvention support from the government will be released twice in a year. The bank will submit consolidated statement (borrower wise) to the department with their declaration with their repayment status of the loan. In case of any loan account turned to NPA beneficiary will not be allowed to receive the interest subvention from the government. However, on up gradation of the loan account to standard account within the tenure of loan, the borrower will be entitled to receive the interest subvention.

The repayment of the loan by the candidates should be between the bank and candidates and no guarantee shall be given by the Government. However, government may extend support on recovery process as it extending in other loan scheme.

8. Implementation:
The project should be implemented within 3 (three) months of granting the Loan and should start earning income within one year. If the project is not started within three months then it will cease to be sponsor by the scheme. The Loan amount must be spent only for the sanctioned project. Diversion of the Loan amount to any other purpose is strictly prohibited.

-----------------------------------------------END-----------------------------------------------

Application for “Paryatan SahayakPrakalp”


To,
The Managing Director,
Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd, Swetmahal, Palace Compound,
Agartala, Tripura West.


Sir/ Madam,
I would like to avail the benefit of “Interest Subvention Scheme for Tourism Sector”.
The required details are furnished hereunder:-

1. Name of theApplicant:-
(In Block Letters)
2. Father/ Husband/ GuardiansName:-
3. Full address of theapplicant:-
(a) Habitation/Area-
(b) Gram Panchayat/ Ward No-
(c) Block/Nagar Panchayat/Municipal Corporation-
(d) Sub-division-
(e) P/S-
(f) District-
(g) Mobile No-
(h) AadharNo-
4. Date ofBirth:-
5. Gender:- Male/Female
6. Caste:- ST/SC/OBC/UR
7. Economic Status:- APL/BPL/AdhocBPL/NFSA
8. EducationalQualification:-
(Highest)
9. Skill Development Training(if any):-

10. Project Details:-
(a) Name of theProject:-
(b) Location of theProject:-
(c) Total Cost ofProject:-
(d) Whether New Project or ExistingProject:-
(e) Personal investment other than BankLoan:-
(f) Preferred bank for loan:-
1. Bank name:-
2. Branch name:-
(g) Expected Return PerYear:-
(h) Scope of Employment Generation:- If any, then for how manypersons:-
(i) Detail project proposal enclosed:-Yes/No

11. Accountdetails:
b) Name of the Bank &Branch:
c) Accountnumber:
d) IFSC code of the bank:
e) PAN CardNo:


I do hereby declare that the details furnished above are true and best of my knowledge and belief. I further request you to kindly grant my application and oblige thereby.


Date:-
Place: - -----------------------------------
Signature of the Applicant

.................................................... For Official Use Only...................................................

I do hereby recommended this application of Sri/Smt...............
................................................,Address.......................................................................................
....................................................................................................................................................
......................................... for availing of “Interest Subvention Scheme for Tourism Sector”.


Date:- Place:-

MANAGING DIRECTOR
Tripura Tourism Development Corporation Ltd. Swetmahal, Place Compound, Agartala, Tripura

................................................................................................................................... .................

N: B: - Documents to be submitted by the applicant (Xerox Copy):-
1) PRTC/Citizenship ofCandidate.
2) ROR.
3) RationCard.
4) AadharCard.
5) Admit Card/SchoolCertificate.
6) Caste Certificate in case ofST/SC/OBC.
7) Qualification Certificate.
8) Training Certificate ifany.
9) A hand sketch map of the Location of ProposedProject.
10) Copy of bank passbook.




-----------------------------------------------END-----------------------------------------------

























Page 29 of 29

Rajasthan Tourism Policy










Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015







Government of Rajasthan Department of Tourism



























Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015



November, 2015




INDEX
1. Background 05
2. Definition of a Tourism Unit 06
3. Allotment of Government Land for Tourism Units 08
4. Conversion of Land for Tourism Units 09
5. FAR (Floor Area Ratio) 12
6. Regularisation of Existing Tourism Units 12
7. Fiscal Benefits and Incentives 13
8. Incentives for Skill Development 13
9. Time period of Annual Licenses for Tourism Units 13
10. Constitution of Tourism Advisory Committee 14
11. Nodal Department 14
12. Policy Period 14
13. Implementation of the Policy 14
14. Annexure 15
15. Related Notifications 24



Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015
1. Background

Rajasthan is a leading tourism State in the country. Its glorious heritage, colorful living traditions and vibrant culture are special attractions for both, domestic and foreign tourists. The tangible and intangible tourism products of the State offer immense potential for growth of the tourism industry. Development of tourism resources and increasing both, domestic and foreign tourist arrivals is a high priority area for the Union and State Governments. Therefore, there is a need for expanding tourist centric infrastructural facilities to keep pace with the present trends and for potential tourism growth in the State.
Department of Tourism had announced a Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy in 2007. This Policy will now be replaced by Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy, 2015 in order to extend more support and incentives for establishment of Tourism Units in the State.
The new Policy has been framed keeping in view the guidelines under the 'Suraj Sankalp' Policy document, new emerging trends in the tourism sector, representations given by various stakeholders including the tourism and trade organisations and also the suggestions received from other departments.
The Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy, 2015 primarily addresses issues relating to time bound conversion of land for tourism units including new hotels and heritage hotels, time bound approval of building plans, grant of Patta to heritage hotels, allotment of land for tourism units on DLC (District Level Committee) rates, applicability of Rajasthan Investment Promotion Scheme, 2014 (RIPS-2014) for tourism units and smooth and speedy implementation of the provisions of related departments like Revenue, Urban Development and Housing (UDH) & Local Self Government (LSG), Panchayati Raj, etc. It is expected that this Policy will strengthen the existing infrastructure, will foster infrastructure development, income and employment generation and increase the much needed availability of hotel rooms for the tourists. By allowing Heritage Hotels in Rural Abadi/Panchayat areas Rural Tourism is likely to increase manifold.
The definition of Tourism Unit has been expanded to cover various types of tourism units and activities including budget hotels, heritage hotels, resorts, golf courses, adventure sports, etc. It is expected that these steps will bring speedy investment in the State.

05

Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


2. Definition of a Tourism Unit
Tourism Unit will mean a tourism project approved by the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan or by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India and shall include:
I. A Hotel including Motel having accommodation of minimum 20 lettable rooms and a minimum investment of Rs.2 crore. The permissible size of the land/plot shall be as per the rules of UDH/Revenue/Panchayati Raj Departments.
II. A Heritage Hotel means a hotel run in a fort, a fortress, a palace, a haveli, a castle, hunting lodge or residences with heritage features, built prior to 1.1.1950 and approved by Ministry of Tourism, Government of India or Government of Rajasthan.
III. A Budget Hotel having accommodation of minimum 20 lettable rooms and a minimum investment of Rs.2 crore, which provides basic amenities at an affordable & economic rates and those which do not fall in the ambit of Luxury Tax.
IV. A Restaurant or cafeteria having an investment of at least Rs.1 crore (excluding land cost) with seating capacity of a minimum of 40 persons/visitors at a time. The unit must have a hygienically maintained kitchen with modern equipment in the premises as well as a separate toilet facility for ladies and gents.
V. A Resort which provides sports/recreational facilities, riding, swimming or social amenities with boarding and lodging arrangements for holidaying in cottages/rooms.
VI. A Sports Resort such as a Golf Course, Golf Academy or adventure related sports or any other sports activity with or without recreational and accommodation facilities, provided that in respect of a golf course, source of water for the course will substantially be recycled water.
VII. A Health Resort Spa is a short-term residential/lodging facility with the purpose of providing spa services such as massages, yoga, meditation and other related treatments for rejuvenating the body.
VIII. A Camping Site with furnished tents, accommodation, having at least 10 tents along with dining, bathrooms/toilet facilities.

06

Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


IX. An Amusement Park providing various types of rides, games and amusement activities.
X. An Animal Safari Park developed with the permission of the Forests Department.
XI. A MICE/Convention Centre: A covered pillar-less, air conditioned hall having minimum carpet area of 5000 square feet space that provides place for meetings, conventions/conferences and exhibitions, and can accommodate at least 500 persons at one point of time.
XII. Museum: A building in which objects of historical, scientific, artistic or cultural interest are stored and exhibited and is open for general public with or without ticket.
XIII. A Ropeway established under the prevailing Act and Rules.
XIV. A Tourist Luxury Coach shall mean an air-conditioned coach with push back seats used for the normal transportation of tourists to different tourist destinations and for sightseeing of various tourist places, with a minimum seating capacity of 13 seats. It should be operated by valid All India Permit holder Tourist Transport Operators, recognized by Indian Association of Tour Operators (IATO) and Rajasthan Association of Tour Operators (RATO) and registered in the State of Rajasthan.
XV. Caravan: A specially built vehicle registered with any State Transport Department which is used for the purpose of group oriented leisure travel with bed capacity of at least 4 beds.
XVI. Cruise Tourism: Any Boat/Yacht with a minimum seating capacity for 4 persons, which is licensed by the Transport Department, Government of Rajasthan and having capacity to operate in lakes/rivers of the State for pay-and-use facilities. Boats/Yachts used by hotels to transport or entertain their guests and/or goods/raw materials will not be covered under this definition.
XVII. Hotels and other tourism units classified under the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India guidelines shall also be eligible for obtaining concessions and incentives under this Policy irrespective of number of rooms in it.



07

Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


Note 1: All concerned departments shall adopt the above definition in their respective Acts/Rules/Regulations. The definition of Tourism Units may be revised and amended from time to time keeping in view the emerging trends in the tourism sector, by the Tourism Department, which will also be incorporated in the relevant Acts/Rules/Regulations.
Note 2: Benefits under the Tourism Policy/RIPS can only be availed as per the terms and conditions laid down in prevailing RIPS.
3. Allotment of Government Land for Tourism Units

The State Government can make land available for establishment and development of all types of Tourism Units as per prevailing procedure, which is indicated below:
I. All Development Authorities (like JDA), UITs, Municipal Bodies, Rajasthan Housing Board, Gram Panchayat, Industry Department and District Collectors would identify suitable land for the establishment of Tourism units.
II. Land so identified shall be set apart and reserved for tourism units under intimation to the Tourism Department. Information of such Land Bank would be made available on the website of concerned Local Body/ District Collector/Revenue Department and on Tourism Department website.
III. The maximum and minimum land areas to be reserved for tourism units shall be as under:

S. No. Category Minimum Land Area Maximum Land Area
1. Budget Hotels and 1 to 3 Star Hotels
1,200 sqm
Upto 4,000 sqm
2. 4 Star Hotels 6,000 sqm Upto 12000 sqm
3. 5 Star & above Hotels 18,000 sqm Upto 40,000 sqm
4. Other Tourism Units - As per requirement/ availability

08

Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


IV. The allotment of such land shall be made on the prevailing DLC rate of the local area.
V. The process of competitive bidding and allotment for such tourism units on DLC rate for the local area shall be as follows:
a. The Authority Concerned shall notify to public through national and state level advertisements for allotment of land identified and reserved for tourism units through competitive bidding process. The DLC rate for the local area for allotment of land shall be indicated in the advertisement and this price shall be the base price for allotment of land.
b. In case more than one applicant apply for the land within the specified time period, the allotment of land shall be made through competitive bidding. In case no other application is received in the specified time period, the allotment of land, shall be made to the single bidder on the prevailing DLC rate for the local area, in keeping with the other provisions of the Tourism Unit Policy.
c. Land made available under this Policy cannot be used for any other purpose for at least 30 years.


4. Conversion of Land for Tourism Units
No conversion charges shall be payable for land held by tenant for establishment of a tourism unit in urban as well as in rural areas.
No development charges shall be payable by Tourism Units. Necessary notification/orders in this regard shall be issued by concerned Departments.
In addition to free of cost conversion and development charges for heritage hotels, UDH & LSG, Panchayati Raj, Revenue Department, etc. will also issue conversion orders for existing and operating heritage hotels/buildings. Similar order will also be issued for those who intend to convert heritage buildings in to heritage hotels after issue of this Policy.



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The following additional provisions are being provided for:
(A) Fixing of Time limits for Conversion of Land and Approval of Building Plans:
I. Conversion of Land in Urban Area: The competent authority shall dispose off an application for conversion of land for tourism unit within 60 days from the date of filing of application which is complete in all respects.
In case orders for conversion of land are not issued within prescribed time limit, the land in question will be regarded as deemed converted.
II. Approval of Building Plans: The competent Authority to approve the building plan in urban area shall dispose of the application within 60 days of receipt of application complete in all respects.
Similarly, time limits are also fixed for construction and operation of tourism units by the investor, which are as under:
i. A tourism unit having less than 200 rooms will be required to be completed within 3 years after conversion of land. In case there is a requirement for seeking approval of building plan, the above permitted time period for completion of tourism unit will commence from the date of approval of building plans by the concerned authority.
ii. A tourism unit having more than 200 rooms will be required to be completed within 4 years after conversion of land. In case there is a requirement for seeking approval of building plan, the above permitted time period for completion of tourism unit will commence from the date of approval of building plans by the concerned authority.
Provided further that an extension of one more year could be given based on merits of the case by the authorities concerned after which all concessions shall stand withdrawn/ lapsed.
III. Conversion of Land in Rural Area: The competent authority shall dispose off an application for conversion of land within 45 days from the date of filing of application complete in all respects.
Similarly, time limits are also fixed for construction and operation of tourism units by the investor, which are as under:
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i. A tourism unit having less than 200 rooms will be required to be completed within 3 years after conversion of land.
ii. A tourism unit having more than 200 rooms will be required to be completed within 4 years after conversion of land.
An extension of one year could be given based on merits of the case by the authorities concerned after which all concessions shall stand withdrawn/lapsed and the applicant shall have to register again.
In case orders for conversion of land are not issued within prescribed time limit, the land in question will be regarded as deemed converted.
(B) Conversion of Residential Land and Heritage Properties into Hotels and other Tourism Units
No fee for change in land use for conversion of residential land and heritage properties into hotels and other tourism units shall be charged.
(C) Heritage hotels situated on narrow roads in urban areas which arrange for a dedicated alternative parking on a 40/60 feet wide road and provide for the park-and- ride system from hotel to parking place, shall be permitted to operate.
Similarly heritage hotels situated on narrow roads in Rural and Panchayat/Rural Abadi Areas will be permitted to operate.
The same shall be applicable for existing heritage buildings proposed to be used as heritage hotels.
(D) Minimum Road Width: New tourism units in rural and Panchayat areas shall be permitted provided there is availability of a 30 feet wide road.
(E) Permissible Area for Commercial Use by Heritage Properties: Heritage hotels can commercially convert maximum of 1000 sq meters or 10% of plinth area of the existing heritage building, whichever is less.
(F) Issue of Patta for Heritage Properties: Owners of heritage properties who do not have a legal Patta for claiming ownership of those Heritage properties would be given lease/free hold rights by the Municipality in accordance with the Rajasthan Municipalities (surrender of non-agricultural land and grant of freehold lease) Rules,
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2015 issued vide notification no. F8 (G) Rules/2015/7960 dated 15.06.2015 by the LSG Department (refer www.rajasthantourism.gov.in). Panchayati Raj Department will formulate rules for issuance of Patta for heritage properties in Rural Abadi area.
(G) Lease Amount: After conversion of land, lease amount for tourism units in urban areas will be charged on rates prescribed for Institutional purposes.
(H) Urban Development Tax: For heritage hotels, UD Tax shall be charged on residential rates on the built up area but there will be no UD Tax on open area.
For budget and 1 to 3 star hotels, UD Tax shall be charged on residential rates on the built up area. For 4 & 5 star hotels, UD Tax shall be charged on double of residential rates on the built up area. But for open area of these hotels, UD Tax will be charged at the rate of 50% of residential rates.
(I) BSUP Charge: Basic Services for Urban Poor (BSUP) charges for heritage hotels would be charged only for the covered area. For all other tourism units, BSUP will be applicable as per existing Urban Development and Housing and LSG Department guidelines.
5. Floor Area Ratio (FAR)
Under the Tourism Unit Policy, 2007, double FAR was available for tourism units in newly developed and new township areas.
At present, standard FAR is 1.33 without betterment levy, and maximum FAR is 2.25 with Betterment Levy is permissible. Tourism units covered under this Policy shall be allowed double FAR i.e. 4.50, out of which 2.25 shall be without betterment levy. Rate for betterment levy shall be calculated on the basis of residential reserve price of the area.
6. Regularization of Existing Hotel Units
(A) There are some heritage properties and residential land and buildings that are running and operating as hotels or other tourism units without permission. If land and buildings are being used as hotels and tourism units without prior permission, the same shall be regularized under Rule 13 of Rajasthan Municipality (Change in Land Use) Rules 2010. Separate orders will be issued in this regard by the UDH & LSG Department.
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(B) Panchayati Raj Department will formulate rules for regularisation of existing heritage hotels in rural (Abadi) areas, and also for other existing heritage buildings which may be used as heritage hotels in future.
7. Fiscal Benefits and Incentives

(A) All fiscal benefits as provided in Rajasthan Investment Promotion Scheme, 2014 (RIPS- 2014) for the Tourism Sector Enterprises shall be available to the eligible tourism units.
(B) The projects approved by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India, if eligible under the provision of the Rajasthan Investment Promotion Scheme, 2014 (RIPS-2014), shall be allowed to avail the benefits as provided under RIPS-2014.

8. Incentives for Skill Development
All Tourism Units registered with the Department of Tourism will be directly eligible to become training partners under the Employment Linked Skill Training Program (ELSTP) subject to availability of infrastructure as per the guidelines of Rajasthan Skill and Livelihoods Development Corporation (RSLDC). If enrolled as a training partner, management of the respective hotels would be required to set up a training center within the hotel premises using existing/additional infrastructure for the selected courses from the approved list of RSLDC, mobilise youth for training, organize training as per syllabus, follow RSLDC guidelines while conducting of skill training programmes, participate in third party assessment and certification process, etc. Moreover, they would also have to ensure that at least 50% of the trained youth is linked to employment in accordance with the norms of Employment Linked Skill Training Programmes (ELSTP).
Heritage hotels, on hiring trained youth (certified under RSLDC) would be eligible to get subsidies/incentives as per norms, if available.

9. Time Period of Licenses for Tourism Units
All concerned Departments shall issue orders extending duration of annual licenses required to operate hotels and other tourism units for a period of ten years in the first instance itself.
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10. Constitution of Tourism Advisory Committee
A Tourism Advisory Committee will be constituted to give suggestions regarding measures that can be taken up for growth of tourism in the State. The Committee will also include representatives from tourism & travel trade.

11. Nodal Department
Department of Tourism shall be the nodal department for infrastructural development of tourism units.

12. Policy Period
This Policy will remain in force for five years from the date of issue. However, tourism unit projects already approved by the Tourism Department under Tourism Unit Policy, 2007 but are pending for land conversion/approval of building plan/regularisation before the competent authority will not be required to apply afresh. Such units shall receive all incentives and concessions granted under Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy, 2015 and
RIPS-2014.

13. Implementation of the Policy
In case concerned Departments require amendments in their respective rules/sub-rules and notifications for implementation of this Policy, the same can be done after obtaining approval of Hon’ble Chief Minister, Rajasthan, who has been authorized in this regard by the Cabinet Order No. 103/2015 dated 18/5/2015.









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Annex-1
Relevant Excerpts from
Rajasthan Investment Promotion Scheme, 2014

In order to promote investment in the State of Rajasthan, and to generate employment opportunities through such investment, the State Government of Rajasthan, in public interest, hereby issues “The Rajasthan Investment Promotion Scheme, 2014” (RIPS-2014) (hereinafter referred to as “the Scheme”). The Scheme shall promote investment made by Enterprise(s) for establishment of new unit and/or investment made by the existing Enterprise(s) for expansion and/or investment made for revival of sick enterprise.
1. Operative Period
The Scheme shall come into effect from the date of issuance of this order and shall remain in force up to 31st March 2019.
2. Definitions
(xxi) “Manufacturing Enterprise” means an enterprise employing plant and
machinery in processing of goods which brings into existence a commercially different and distinct commodity and shall include an enterprise in the tourism sector, but shall not include such processing as may be specified by the State Government by an order;
(xxxviii) “Tourism Sector” means:
(a) A hotel or motel making minimum investment of rupees five crore and having accommodation of minimum 20 let-able rooms; or
(b) A heritage hotel, certified as such by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India and/or by the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan; or
(c) Or any other immovable tourism unit other than a restaurant, defined as such under the Tourism Policy of the State, subject to the condition that it shall be eligible for only such benefits as may be granted to it by the State Empowered Committee.



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3. Applicability of the Scheme
Subject to clause 3.3 below, the Scheme shall be applicable to the following classes of enterprise(s) and investment, excluding investment mentioned in Annexure- I, appended to the Scheme:
(i) New and existing enterprises making investment for setting up new units;
(ii) Existing enterprise making investment for expansion; and
(iii) Sick enterprises making investment for its revival:
provided that the enterprise shall commence commercial production or operation during the operative period of the Scheme.
Notwithstanding anything contained in clause 3.1 above, the State Government, on the recommendation of the State Empowered Committee (SEC), may grant the benefit of the Scheme to the first manufacturing enterprise, investing Rs.250 crore or more in a block notified as a most backward area, provided that the investment is not relating to entry number 1 and 4 of Annexure I, appended to the Scheme.
The Scheme shall not be applicable to an enterprise if its commercial production or operation has commenced before the issuance of this order or an entitlement certificate or any order or any customized package has been issued to provide any incentive or benefit under RIPS 2010 or any other scheme or policy or otherwise for such unit.
4. Benefits to Manufacturing Enterprises
An eligible manufacturing enterprise shall be granted benefits and incentives as given below:
(i) Investment subsidy of 30% of VAT and CST which have become due and have been deposited by the enterprise for seven years.
(ii) Employment Generation Subsidy up to 20% of VAT and CST which have become due and have been deposited by the enterprise, for seven years.
(iii) Exemption from payment of 50% of Electricity Duty for seven years, provided that for enterprises engaged in tourism sector, it shall be restricted to 25% of the Electricity Duty;
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(iv) Exemption from payment of 50% of Land Tax for seven years;
(v) Exemption from payment of 50% of Mandi Fee for seven years;
(vi) Exemption from payment of 50% of Stamp Duty on purchase or lease of land and construction or improvement on such land; and
(vii) Exemption from payment of 50% of conversion charges payable for change of land use.
5. Benefits to Service Enterprises
An eligible service enterprise shall be granted benefits and incentives as given below:
(i) Reimbursement of 50% of amount of VAT paid on purchase of plant and machinery or equipment for a period up to seven years from date of issuance of the entitlement certificate, provided that for enterprises engaged in providing entertainment, the reimbursement shall be restricted to 25% of such amount of VAT paid;
(ii) Exemption from payment of 50% of Entertainment Tax for seven years;
(iii) Exemption from payment of 50% of Electricity Duty for seven years,
provided that for enterprises engaged in providing entertainment, it shall be restricted to 25% of the Electricity Duty;
(iv) Exemption from payment of 50% of Land Tax for seven years;
(v) Exemption from payment of 50% of Stamp Duty on purchase or lease of land and construction or improvement on such land; and
(vi) Exemption from payment of 50% of conversion charges payable for change of land use.
6. Special Provisions for Women, Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes and Persons with Disability Enterprise
Eligible Women/Schedule Caste (SC)/Schedule Tribe (ST)/Person with disability (PwD) enterprises shall in addition to the benefits specified in other clauses of the Scheme, be eligible to avail the following additional benefits:
(i) A manufacturing enterprise shall get additional Investment subsidy to the extent of

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10% of VAT and CST which have become due and have been deposited by the enterprise;
(ii) A service enterprise shall get additional 10% reimbursement of VAT paid on the plant and machinery or equipment for a period up to seven years from date of issuance of the entitlement certificate for this purpose.
7. Benefits to Enterprises in Backward and Most Backward Areas
An eligible enterprise, other than a cement manufacturing enterprise, making investment in a backward area or a most backward area shall be granted the same benefits as would have been applicable if the enterprise was located elsewhere in the state but the period of benefit, except for interest subsidy, shall be extended to ten years.
Provided that the State Government may, on the recommendation of the State Empowered Committee (SEC), grant to a manufacturing enterprise, other than a cement manufacturing enterprise and a service enterprise making an investment in a backward area, such benefits as mentioned in clauses 7.2 and 7.3 respectively, which are applicable for investments in most backward areas, with a view to attract investment in the backward area.
A manufacturing enterprise, other than a cement manufacturing enterprise, making investment in a most backward area shall, in addition to benefits under clause
7.1 above, get additional investment subsidy of 20% of the VAT and CST which have become due and have been deposited by the enterprise for a period of seven years.
7.3 A service enterprise making investment in a backward area shall, in addition to benefits mentioned in other clauses of the Scheme, get additional 10% reimbursement of VAT paid and a service enterprise making investment in a most backward area shall, in addition to benefits mentioned in other clauses of the Scheme, get additional 20% reimbursement of VAT paid on the plant and machinery or equipment for a period up to seven years from the date of issuance of the entitlement certificate for this purpose.



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8. Power to Grant Customized Package
Notwithstanding anything contained in the Scheme, the State Government, on the recommendation of State Empowered Committee (SEC), may grant a customized package under section 11 of the Rajasthan Enterprises Single Window Enabling and Clearance Act, 2011, to the following manufacturing enterprises, other than cement manufacturing enterprises:
(a) Enterprises investing more than Rs500 crore or providing employment to more than 500 persons; or
(b) Enterprises investing more than Rs100 crore and using the mineral mentioned in Annexure-III appended to the Scheme, as raw material.
Notwithstanding anything contained in the Scheme, the State Government may grant a customized package to the service enterprises investing more than Rs200 crore or providing employment to more than 500 persons.
9. Benefits to Manufacturing Enterprises in Thrust Sectors
Notwithstanding anything contained in the Scheme, the State Government may grant a special package of incentives and exemptions, which may be over and above the incentives and exemptions under Clauses 4 to 7 to a manufacturing enterprise in a thrust sector in addition to the thrust sectors mentioned in sub-clauses 9.3 to 9.12
9.2. Manufacturing enterprises in the sectors mentioned hereunder shall be allowed benefits mentioned in this clause, in addition to benefits related to tax exemptions mentioned at (iii) to (vii) of clause 4 and benefits mentioned in clauses 6 and 7, if applicable, subject to conditions, mentioned against the sector:
Provided that an enterprise of power loom sector and textile sector may opt for benefits provided in clause 4 to 7, if applicable, in lieu of the benefits mentioned in this clause.
Tourism Sector
Enterprises of the tourism sector covered under sub-clause (a) and (b) of clause 2 (xxxviii) of the Scheme shall be granted the following benefits:
(a) Investment Subsidy of 50% of VAT and CST which have become due and have

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been deposited by the enterprise for seven years;
(b) Employment Generation Subsidy up to 10% of VAT and CST which have become due and have been deposited by the enterprise, for seven years;
(c) Reimbursement of 25% of amount of VAT paid on purchase of plant and machinery or equipment for a period up to seven years from the date of issuance of the entitlement certificate;
(d) Exemption from payment of 50% of Entertainment Tax for seven years;
(e) Exemption from payment of 100% of Luxury Tax for seven years;
(f) Land allotment in urban and rural areas at DLC rates;
(g) 25% additional exemption from payment of stamp duty chargeable on the instrument of purchase or lease of more than 100 years old heritage property in the State, for the purpose of hotel development under the Scheme declared by the Tourism Department as provided in notification no. F.12 (20) FD/Tax/2005-219 of 24.03.2005; and
(h) 50% additional exemption from payment of conversion charges for heritage property converted into a heritage hotel.
Notwithstanding anything contained in the Scheme, an enterprise making investment in the tourism sub-sector defined under sub-clause (c) of clause 2 (xxxviii) of the Scheme shall be granted the benefits, as may be provided to it by the State Empowered Committee.
14.8 Terms & Conditions
a. Benefits under the Scheme can only be availed if, and as long as there is, and for the period/s, consent to "operate", wherever applicable, from Central/Rajasthan State Pollution Control Board is effective.








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AMENDMENTS IN RIPS-2014 RELATING TO TOURISM SECTOR
Amendments in RIPS-2014 vide Finance Department order dated 07.01.2015:

Amendment in clause 14.8: In clause 14.8 of the scheme, for the existing expression “consent to “operate” “, the expression “consent to establish and consent to operate” shall be substituted.
Amendments in RIPS-2014 vide Finance Department Clarification dated 23.01.2015:
1. Interpretation of clause 2(xxxviii) of the scheme:
(b) A heritage hotel, certified as such by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India/ or by the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan;
It is clarified that, heritage hotels, certified by Ministry of Tourism, Government of India and/ or Tourism Department, Government of Rajasthan are covered under the said clause without any minimum investment limit and are eligible to avail benefits under clause 9.12 of the Scheme.
2. Interpretation of clause 2 (xxi) of the Scheme:
Since Restaurant are manufacturing cooked food and other eatables, therefore, it is clarified that Restaurants are covered under the Scheme and are eligible to avail benefits under clause 4 of the Scheme.
Amendments in RIPS-2014 vide Finance Department order dated 09.03.2015: Amendment of clause 2
In clause 2 of the Scheme,
(i) after the existing sub-clause (iv) and before the existing sub-clause (v), of the scheme, the following new sub-clause (iva) shall be inserted, namely:
“(iva) “convention centre” means a covered pillar-less air conditioned hall having minimum carpet area of 5000 square feet which provides place for meetings, conventions/conferences, exhibitions and can accommodate at least 500 person at one point of time.”
(iii) in sub-clause (xxxviii):
(i) the existing sub-clause (a) of the Scheme, shall be substituted by the following, namely:

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“(a) A hotel or motel making minimum investment of rupees two crore and having accommodation of minimum 20 let-able rooms; or”
(iv) after the existing sub sub-clause (b) and before the existing sub-clause (c) of the Scheme, the following new sub-clause (bb) shall be inserted, namely:
“(bb) a convention centre or a resort making minimum investment of rupees two crore; or”. Amendment in clause 9.12.1
In clause 9.12.1 of the scheme:
(I) in sub-clause (g) of the said clause, the existing expression “; and” shall be substituted by the punctuation mark “;”.
(ii) the existing sub-clause (h) of the said clause, shall be substituted by the following, namely:
“(h) 50% additional exemption from payment of conversion charges; and”
(iii) after the existing sub-clause (h) so substituted, the following new sub clause (i) shall be inserted, namely:
“(i) 100% exemption from payment of development charges.”.
Note: For procedures and other details please refer to website www.finance.rajasthan.gov.in













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Annex-2
Special Incentives available for Heritage Hotels in Tourism Unit Policy, 2015

1. Minimum investment limit shall not be applicable to heritage hotels for availing RIPS benefits.
2. Heritage hotels situated on narrow roads in urban areas which arrange for a dedicated alternative parking on a 40/60 feet wide road and provide park-and-ride system from hotel to parking place, shall be permitted to operate on such roads.
3. Similarly, heritage hotels situated on narrow roads in Rural /Rural Abadi areas will be permitted to operate.
4. These provisions shall also be applicable for existing heritage buildings proposed to be used as heritage hotels in future.
5. Concernd Departments will issue conversion orders for existing and operating heritage hotels/building. Similar order will also be issued for those which intend to operate heritage buildings as heritage hotels after issue of this Policy.
6. For Rural (Abadi) areas, Panchayati Raj Department will formulate rules for regularization of existing Heritage Hotels and also other existing Heritage buildings which may be used as heritage hotels in future.
7. Heritage hotels will be allowed to convert a maximum of 1000 square metres or 10% of plinth area, whichever is less for commercial use.
8. Additional exemption of 25% on Stamp Duty will be available for more than 100 years old heritage properties as per the scheme declared by the Department of Tourism as provided in the Finance Department notification No.F.12(20) FD/ Tax/ 2005-2019 dated 24.03.2005.
9. Basic Service for Urban Poor (BSUP) charges shall be levied only on the constructed area of Heritage hotels.
10. Heritage Hotels approved by Ministry of Tourism, Government of India/ Government of Rajasthan shall be eligible for all benefits under RIPS.
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FINANCE DEPARTMENT (TAX DIVISION)
ORDER
Jaipur, April 10, 2015
In exercise of the powers conferred by clause 16 read with sub-clause (c) of clause 9.12.1 of the Rajasthan Investment Promotion Scheme - 2014 (hereinafter referred to as ”the Scheme”). The State Government hereby, clarifies that the reimbursement of 25% of amount of VAT paid on purchase of plant and machinery or equipment to a tourism sector enterprise as defined under the scheme shall be allowed on the purchase of goods mentioned in the list given below, in accordance with the provisions of the scheme.
LIST
S.No. Particulars
1. AC Plants, ACs, Fans & Exhaust Fans, Coolers etc.
2. Pollution control machines for air, water and light
3. Non CFC equipment for refrigeration and air conditioning and other Eco-friendly measures and initiatives.
4. DG Sets
5. Housekeeping machines & equipments.
6. Solar Heaters and Solar Plants/Geysers/Cold & Hot Running water machine
7. Furniture
8. Lifts & Elevators
9. Metal detectors (door frame or hand held)
10. CCTV
11. X-Ray Machine
12. Under belly scanners to screen vehicles
13. Smoke detectors
14. Heating and Cooling systems, machines & plants
15. Safe keeping / in room safe
16. Minibar / Fridge
17. TV
18. Dry-cleaning / laundry related equipment
19. Tea / Coffee making machines, equipments etc.
Note: Goods mentioned above shall be allowed one time for initial set up including the goods mentioned at S.No. 15, 16, 17 which shall be allowed one set per room.
[F-12(14)FD-Tax-2012-pt-I 5]
By order of the Governor
(Aditya Pareek)
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Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


REVENUE (GROUP-6) DEPARTMENT


No. F.11(4)Rev-6/2014/16

NOTIFICATION


Jaipur, Dated: 22 May 2015

In exercise of the powers conferred by clause (xi-A) of sub-section (2) of section 261 read with section 90-A of the Rajasthan Land Revenue Act, 1956 (Act No. 15 of 1956), the State Government hereby makes the following rules further to amend the Rajasthan Land Revenue (Conversion of agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes in rural areas) Rules, 2007, namely:-
1. Short title and commencement.- (1) These rules may be called the Rajasthan Land Revenue (Conversion of agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes in rural areas) (Fifth Amendment) Rules, 2015.
(2) They shall come into force at once.
2. Amendment of rule 2.- In sub-rule (1) of rule 2 of the Rajasthan Land Revenue (Conversion of agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes in rural areas) Rules, 2007, hereinafter referred to as the said rules, -
(i) In clause (b), for the existing expression “hotel, restaurant”, the expression “hotel other than tourism unit, restaurant other than tourism unit” shall be substituted.
(ii) the existing clause (r) shall be substituted by the following, namely:-
“(r) ‘Tourism Unit’ means a tourism unit or project as such approved by the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan or approved by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India.”
3. Insertion of new rule 6C.- After the existing rule 6B and before the existing rule 7 of the said rules, the following new rule 6C shall be inserted, namely:-
“6C. Conversion of Heritage Properties into Heritage Hotels.- Notwithstanding anything contained in these rules if owner of a heritage property, situated on agriculture land, applies on plain paper for conversion of Heritage Property into Heritage Hotel along with recommendation of the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan, an order for conversion to this effect may be issued by the prescribed authority within the time limit prescribed under rule 9. No conversion charges shall be payable for conversion under this rule. Land converted under this rule may be used for commercial purpose up to maximum of 1000 sq meters or 10 percent of plinth area of the existing
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heritage building.”
4. Amendment of rule 8.- The existing sub-rule (2) of rule 8 of the said rules shall be substituted by the following, namely:
“(2) No conversion charges as prescribed in rule 7, shall be payable for conversion of land held by tenant for establishment of a tourism unit as defined in clause (r) of sub-rule (1) of rule 2.”
5. Amendment of rule 9.- In sub-rule (2) of rule 9 of the said rules, after the existing last proviso, the following new proviso shall be added, namely:
“Provided also that in case of heritage hotels, if parking arrangement is made available by the owner in premises or elsewhere, the requirement of width of approach road shall not be applicable.”
6. Amendment of rule 14.- In rule 14 of the said rules,-
(i) the existing provision shall be numbered as sub-rule (1).
(ii) in sub-rule (1), so numbered, after existing expression “non-agricultural purpose” and before the existing expression “, shall be used”, the expression “other than tourism unit” shall be inserted.
(iii) after sub-rule (1), so numbered, the following new sub-rule (2) shall be added, namely: “(2) Any agricultural land converted for tourism unit shall be used for establishment of tourism unit within the time limit specified as under,-
(i) three years for a tourism unit having less than 200 rooms.
(ii) four years for a tourism unit having more than 200 rooms.
Provided that above period may, in appropriate case, further be extended for a period of one year by the prescribed authority. If the land is not used within such extended period, the conversion order and other concessions shall be withdrawn after giving an opportunity of being heard."
By order of the Governor, (Anil Kumar Agrawal)
Joint Secretary to the Government




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REVENUE (GROUP-6) DEPARTMENT


No. F.11(4)Rev-6/2014/17

NOTIFICATION


Jaipur, Dated: 22 May 2015

In exercise of the powers conferred by section 100 of the Rajasthan Land Revenue Act, 1956 (Act No. 15 of 1956), the State Government hereby makes the following rules further to amend the Rajasthan Industrial Areas Allotment Rules, 1959, namely:
1. Short title and commencement.- (1) These rules may be called the Rajasthan Industrial Areas Allotment (Third Amendment) Rules, 2015.
(2) They shall come into force at once.
2. Amendment of rule 1A.- The existing clause (viii) of rule 1A of the Rajasthan Industrial area allotment Allotment, Rules, 1959, hereinafter referred to as the said rules, shall be substituted by the following, namely:
“(viii) ‘Tourism Unit’ means a tourism unit or project as defined in the prevailing policy of the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan or approved by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India.”
3. Amendment of rule 2.- In rule 2 of the said rules,-
(i) in clause (a), for the existing expression “Government in the Tourism Department”, the expression “Government in the Revenue Department” shall be substituted.
(ii) in sub-clause (i) of clause (b) for the existing expression “Director of Tourism”, the expression “Government in the Revenue Department” shall be substituted.
4. Amendment of rule 3A.- The existing third proviso to rule 3A of the said rules shall be deleted.
5. Insertion of new rule 3B.- After the existing rule 3A and before the existing rule 4 of the said rules, the following new rule 3B shall be inserted, namely:
“3B. Allotment of Land for Tourism Units.-
(1) For establishment and development of Tourism Units, the District Collector shall identify suitable land for the establishment of tourism units. The land so identified shall be set apart and reserved for tourism units under intimation to the Tourism Department



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and same shall be uploaded on the web-site of the District Collector and Tourism Department. The maximum and minimum land areas to be reserved for tourism units shall be as under:

S. No. Category Minimum Land Area Maximum Land Area
1 2 3 4
1. Budget Hotels and 1 to 3 stars hotels 1200 square meters Up to 4000 square meters
2. 4 stars Hotels 6000 square meters Up to 12,000 square meters
3. 5 Stars and above hotels 18000 square meters Up to 40,000 square meters
4. Other Tourism units - As per requirement/ availability

(2) The reserve price for allotment of land set apart and reserved for tourism unit shall be equal to the rates recommended for assessment of market value of agriculture land by district level committee under rule 58 of the Rajasthan Stamp Rules, 2004.
(3) Allotment of land for tourism units shall be made in the following manner, namely:
(a) The Allotting Authority shall invite bids for allotment of land for tourism units set apart and reserved for tourism unit under sub-rule (1) through advertisement published in National and State level news paper. The reserve price for allotment of land shall be mentioned in the advertisement.
(b) In case more than one bid received within the specified time period, the allotment of land shall be made through competitive bidding. In case only single bid is received in the specified time period, the allotment of land shall be made to the single bidder on the prevailing reserve price or the price offered by the bidder, whichever is higher.
(c) Land allotted under this rule shall be used for establishment of tourism unit within the time limit specified as under,-
(i) three years for a tourism unit having less than 200 rooms.
(ii) four years for a tourism unit having more than 200 rooms.
Provided that above period may, in appropriate case, further be extended for a period of one year by the prescribed authority. If the land is not used within such extended period, the
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allotment shall be withdrawn after giving an opportunity of being heard.
(d) Land allotted under this rule shall be used only for the purpose of tourism unit and not for any other purpose at least for a period of thirty years.”
6. Amendment of rule 7.- In rule 7 of the said rules, for the existing expression "industries", the expression "industries other than tourism unit" shall be substituted.
7. Amendment of Form-B.- In Form-B appended to the said rules,-
(i) for the existing expression “Tourism Deptt.”, the expression “Revenue Department” shall be substituted.
(ii) for the existing expression “Director, Industries/Tourism”, the expression “Director, Industries/Secretary, Revenue Department” shall be substituted.

By order of the Governor, (Anil Kumar Agrawal)
Joint Secretary to the Government























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Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


REVENUE (GROUP-6) DEPARTMENT

No. F. 11(4) Rev.6/2014/21 Jaipur, Dates: 29.5.2015


Notification


In excerise of the powers conferred by clause (xi-A) of sub-section (2) of section 261 read with section 90-A of the Rajasthan Land Revenue Act, 1956 (Act No. 15 of 1956), the State Government hereby makes the following rules further to amend the Rajasthan Land Revenue (Conversion of agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes in rural areas) Rules, 2007, namely:

1. Short title and commencement: (1) These rules may be called the Rajasthan Land Revenue (Conversion of agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes in rural areas) (Sixth Amendment)
Rules, 2015
(2) They shall come into force at once
2. Amendment of rule 9: After the existing sub-rule (7) of rule 9 of the Rajasthan Land Revenue (Conversion of agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes in rural areas) Rules, 2007, following new sub-rule (8) shall be added, namely:
“(8) Notwithstanding anything contained in sub-rule (3), (4), (5) and (6) if the prescribed authority, fails to dispose off the application of conversion of land for the establishment of tourism unit as defined in clause (r) of sub-rule (1) of rule 2 within 45 days of the receipt of the completed application along with required documents, then such land shall be deemed converted.”



By order of the Governor (Anil Kumar Agarwal)
Joint Secretary to the Government


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Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


TRANSPORT DEPARTMENT
NOTIFICATION
F.6(266)/Pari/Tax/Hqrs/2006/8366-79 Jaipur, Dated: 15.5.2015 In exercise of the powers conferred by sub section (1) of section 3 of Rajasthan Motor Vehicles Taxation Act 1951 (Act No.11 of 1951) and in supersession of this department's Notification No. F6(179)/pair/tax/Hqrs/95/5, dated 9.3.2015, the State Government being of the opinion that it is expedient in public interest so to do, hereby exempts fifty percent of
Special Road Tax payable under section 4-B of the said Act, on the air conditioned
passenger vehicles, except sleeper coach, having seating capacity more than 12 including driver, subject to the following conditions, namely:
1. that the Vehicle shall be registered in the State of Rajasthan in the name of tourist transport operator;
2. that the tourist permit of the vehicle shall be issued by competent authority of State of Rajasthan in the name of recognized tourist operator; and
3. that the tourist transport operator shall be recognized by Ministry of Tourism, Government of India or Tourism Department, Government of Rajasthan, Indian Association of Tour Operators (IATO) and Rajasthan Association of Tour Operators (RATO) and approved as such by the Transport Commissioner.
This notification shall have effect from 01.5.2015 and shall remain in force upto 30.4.2018.

By Order of the Governor, (Dr. Manisha Arora),
Joint Secretary to Government








31

Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


uxjh; fodkl foHkkx
Øekad % i-18¼1½ufofo@i-bZ-uh-@2015 t;iqj] fnukad% 6-6-2015

i;ZVu foHkkx }kjk i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr 2015] tkjh dh tk pqdh gSA vr% bl uhfr ds vUrxZr ifjHkkf"kr leLr i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa ¼Hkfo"; esa i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr esa gksus okys la'kks/kuksa dks lfEefyr djrs gq;s½ dks Hkwfe miyC/k djkus Hkw&:ikUrj.k ;k vU; NwV ,oa lqfo/kk iznku djus gsrq foHkkx }kjk tkjh iwoZ ds leLr ifji=ksa ¼i-10¼61½ufofo@3@06ikVZ fnukad 24-12-2007] 16- 04-2013] 18-03-2014 ,oa 26-03-2014½ dks vf/kØfer djrs gq; fuEukuqlkj vkns'k tkjh fd;s tkrs gS%
1 gksVykas ,oa i;ZVu bdkbZ gsrq Hkwfe vkoaVu &
¼i½ jkT; ljdkj }kjk fofHké i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa] ftlesa leLr izdkj ds gksVy lfEefyr gS] dh LFkkiuk o fodkl gsrq Hkwfe dh miyC/krk fuEu izdkj ls dh tk;sxh &
¼v½ t;iqj@tks/kiqj@vtesj fodkl izkf/kdj.k] uxj fodkl U;klksa] uxj ikfydvksa ,oa jktLFkku vkoklu e.My }kjk i;ZVu bdkbZ;ka] ftlesa gksVy Hkh lfEefyr gS] dh LFkkiuk gsrq mi;qDr Hkwfe dk p;u dj Hkwfe cSad dh LFkkiuk dh tks;xh] ftlesa fofHké Js.kh ds gksVyksa o i;ZVu bdkbZ gsrq Hkwfe dk vkj{k.k fd;k tk;sxk%
¼1½ ctV gksVy ¼1] 2 o 3 flrkjk½
¼2½ pkj flrkjk gksVy
¼3½ ikap flrkjk gksVy o MhyDl Js.kh ds gksVy
¼4½ vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ
¼c½ bl izdkj LFkkfir Hkwfe cSad dh lwpuk LFkkuh; fudk; ,oa i;ZVu foHkkx dh osc lkbZV ij miyC/k djk;h tk;sxhA
¼l½ fofHké Js.kh dh gksVyksa o vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa dks vf/kdre@U;wure Hkwfe {ks= dk fu/kkZj.k fuEukuqlkj fd;k tk;sxkA







32

Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015



Øa la gksVy Js.kh U;wure Hkwfe {ks= vf/kdre Hkwfe {ks=
1 ctV gksVy ¼1] 2 o 3 flrkjk½ 4000 oxZehVj rd
2 4 flrkjk 6000 oxZ ehVj rd 12]000 oxZehVj rd
3 5 flrkjk o MhyDl Js.kh 18]000 oxZ ehVj rd 40]000 oxZehVj rd
4 vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ & vko';drk@miyC/krkuqlkj
 mijksDrkuqlkj i;ZVu bdkbZ gsrq vkoaVu dh nj ml {ks= dh izpfyr Mh-,y-lh- nj gksxhA
 i;ZVu bdkbZ gsrq vkoaVu rqyukRed fufonk ds vk/kkj ij i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr&2015 esa fn;s x;s izko/kkuksa ds vuq:i fd;k tkosA
 bl uhfr ds vUrxZr miyC/k djkbZ xbZ Hkwfe dk mi;ksx vkxkeh 30 o"kksZa rd fu/kkZfjr mi;ksx ls vU;Fkk ugha gks ldsxkA
2- uxjh; {ks=ksa esa —f"k Hkwfe dk :ikUrj.k
¼i½ 'kgjh {ks=ksa esa —f"k Hkwfe dk :ikUrj.k jktLFkku Hkw&jktLo vf/kfu;e] 1956 dh /kkjk 90 ^,^ ds vUrxZr fd;k tk;sxkA lacaf/kr LFkkuh; fudk; ;Fkk t;iqj@tks/kiqj@vtesj fodkl izkf/kdj.k] uxj fodkl U;kl] uxj ikfydk }kjk i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr ds rgr /kkjk 90 ^,^ ds vUrxZr —f"k Hkwfe dk v—f"k Hkwfe esa
:ikUrj.k djus ij :ikUrj.k 'kqYd rFkk fodkl 'kqYd ¼vkUrfjd fodkl dk;Z Hkw[k.M+/kkjh dks Lo;a djus gksaxs½ ns; ugha gksxkA l{ke vf/kdkjh dks —f"k ls xSj —f"k
¼i;ZVu bdkbZ½ iz;kstukFkZ /kkjk 90 ^,^ ds rgr leLr dk;Zokgh vkosnu izkIr gksus ls 60 fnol dh vof/k esa iw.kZ djuh gksxhA ;fn fu/kkZfjr le; lhek 60 fnol esa
:ikUrj.k vkns'k tkjh ugha fd;s tkrs gS] rks iz'uxr Hkwfe Lor% gh :ikUrfjr ekuh tkosxhA i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa@gksVy ds laca/k esa iwoZ esa 90 *ch* ds rgr~ vuqeksfnr izdj.kksa ij Hkh ;s fj;k;rsa ykxw gksaxhA
¼ii½ Pkwafd jkT; ljdkj dh ea'kk gksVy o vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa dks d`f"k@vkS|ksfxd @vkoklh; Hkwfe ls laifjorZu fd;s tkus gsrq lEiw.kZ NwV fn;s tkus dh gS] vr% bl mn~ns'; dh izkfIr gsrq mDr Vkmuf'ki ikWfylh ,oa uxj lq/kkj U;kl ¼uxjh; Hkwfe

33

Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


fu"iknu½ fu;e&1974 jktLFkku uxjh; {ks= ¼Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu½ fu;e] 2010 ds vUrxZr la'kks/ku fd;k tkrk gS fd d`f"k@vkS|ksfxd@vkoklh; Hkwfe ls leLr izdkj ds gksVyksa o vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa dh LFkkiuk ij pkgs os Vkmuf'ki ;kstuk esa Hkw[k.M gks
;k Lora= IykV gks laifjorZu] fodkl 'kqYd ¼vkUrfjd fodkl dk;Z Hkw[k.M/kkjh dks Lo;a djus gksaxs½ ,oa Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu 'kqYd dks i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr tkjh gksus dh fnukad ls 5 o"kZ rd eqDr fd;k tkrk gSA
3- gSfjVst gksVYl ,oa iqjklEifRr;ksa ds laifjorZu o fu;eu ds laca/k esa%
¼i½ dk;Z'khy gSfjVst gksVYl ,oa iqjklEifRr;ksa ftudks gSfjVst gksVy ;k i;ZVu bdkbZ ds
:i esa ifjofrZr fd;k tkuk izLrkfor gS muds fy, i;ZVu foHkkx }kjk izek.k i= tkjh fd;k tk;sxk] ftlds vk/kkj ij lacaf/kr uxjh; fudk; }kjk :ikUrj.k@Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu vkns'k tkjh fd;k tkuk vko';d gksxkA ,sls izdj.kksa esa ekLVj Iyku esa bl Hkwfe dk Hkw&mi;ksx okf.kfT;d ls fHkUu gksus ij Hkh mDr vkns'k tkjh fd;s tk ldsaxsAA
¼ii½ gSfjVst gksVy ds laca/k esa izpfyr Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu fu;e] 2010 esa fu/kkZfjr ekun.M+ksa ds vfrfjDr ,Q-,-vkj-] ÅapkbZ] lSVcSd o Hkw&vkPNknu esa f'kfFkyrk nh tk
ldsxhA
4- iqjklEifRr;ksa eas okf.kfT;d xfrfof/k;ksa dh vuqKs;rk%
jktLFkku uxjh; {ks= ¼Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu½ fu;e] 2010 esa fu;e 13 esa xSj okf.kfT;d Hkwfe dk okf.kfT;d Hkw&mi;ksx gsrq laifjorZu fd;s tkus ds fy, vkoklh; vkjf{kr nj dh 40 izfr'kr jkf'k Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu ds :i esa olwy dh tkrh gS] ysfdu gSfjVst lEifRr dks gSfjVst gksVy esa ifjofrZr djus dh fLFkfr esa fodkldrkZ dks laifjorZu 'kqqYd ,oa fodkl 'kqYd esa 'kr~ izfr'kr NwV gSA orZeku esa lapkfyr gSfjVst gksVyksa ,oa iqjklEifRr;k¡ tks gSjhVst gksVy ;k vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ esa lEifjofrZr gksuh gS] dks O;ogk;Z ¼Viable½ cukus ds fy;s jkT; ljdkj dh ea'kk ds vuq:i muds vkPNkfnr {ks=Qy ¼Ground Coverage½dk vf/kdre 10 izfr'kr vFkok 1000 oxZehVj tks Hkh de gks esa [kqnjk okf.kfT;d ¼Retail Commercial½ mi;ksx Lor% vuqKs; gksxkAA
5- dk;Z’khy i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa dk Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu ,oa fu;eu%
dqN gSfjVst iqjklEifÙk;ksa esa gksVy vFkok vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ fcuk vko';d Loh—fr ds


34

Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


'kq: dj fn;s x;s gSa vkSj oks dk;Z'khy gSa] rks uohu&uhfr esa ,sls gksVyksa o i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa dk Hkw mi;ksx ifjorZu 'kqYd ,oa fodkl 'kqYd ¼vkUrfjd fodkl dk;Z Hkw[k.M+/kkjh dks Lo;a djus gksaxs½ esa iwjh NwV nh tk;sxhA
;fn iwoZ esa fcuk okafNr Lohd`fr ds Hkw[k.M+ksa ,oa Hkouksa dk mi;ksx gksVy o vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa ds :i esa fd;k tk jgk gS] ,slh bdkbZ;ksa dk fu;eu jktLFkku uxj ikfydk
¼Hkw&mi;ksx ifjorZu½ fu;e] 2010 ds fu;e&13 ds vuq:i xq.kkoxq.k ds vk/kkj ij fu;eu 'kqYd dk 25 izfr'kr jkf'k ij fu;eu fd;k tk;sxkA
6- i;ZVu bdkbZ ds Hkou ekufp= vuqeksnu] fuekZ.k ,oa vuqKs; ,Q-,-vkj- ds laca/k esa%
¼I½ uxjh; fudk; }kjk i;ZVu bdkbZ ds Hkou ekufp= ds izdj.k iw.kZ :i ls vkosnu izkIr gksus ls 60 fnol dh vof/k esa vko';d :i ls vuqeksfnr@fu"ikfnr fd;s tk;saxsA
¼ii½ 200 dejksa rd dh i;ZVu bdkbZ dk fuekZ.k dk;Z Hkwfe :ikUrj.k@vkoaVu dh fnukad ls rhu o"kZ dh vof/k esa iw.kZ djuk gksxkA ;fn Hkou ekufp= vuqeksnu dh vko';drk gks rks 3 o"kZ dh fu/kkZfjr vof/k Hkou ekufp= vuqeksnu dh frfFk ls izkjEHk gksxhA 200 dejksa ls vf/kd dh i;ZVu bdkbZ ds fy, fuekZ.k vof/k 4 o"kZ dh gksxhA ;fn Hkou ekufp= vuqeksnu dh vko';drk gks rks vf/kdre 4 o"kZ dh vof/k Hkou ekufp= vuqeksnu dh fnukad ls izkjEHk gksxhA
lacaf/kr izkf/kd`r vf/kdkjh }kjk mijksDr nksuksa izdj.kksa esa xq.kkoxq.k ds vk/kkj ij ,d o"kZ dk le; vfrfjDr iznku fd;k tk ldsxkA
7- ,Q-,-vkj-%
i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr ds rgr i;ZVu bdkbZ@gksVy izLrkfor gksus ij orZeku esa ns; vf/kdre ,Q-,-vkj- dk nksxq.kk vFkkZr~ 4-50 ,Q-,-vkj- vuqKs; gksxk] fdUrq 2-25 ,Q-,- vkj- ls vf/kd ,Q-,-vkj- izLrkfor gksus ij csVjesUV ysoh vfrfjDr ,Q-,-vkj- ij vkoklh; vkjf{kr nj ds vk/kkj ij ns; gksxhA
8- ldM+h lM+dksa ij gSfjVst gksVyksa dh vuqKs;rk%
okafNr pkSM+kbZ ls de pkSM+kbZ dh lM+dksa ij fLFkr gSfjVst lEifRr;ka ftUgsa gSfjVst gksVy ds :i esa mi;ksx esa fy;k tkuk izLrkfor gks rFkk orZeku esa dk;Z'khy gSfjVst gksVYl tks U;wure okafNr pkSM+kbZ dh lM+dksa ij fLFkr ugha gS] rks ,sls gSfjVst gksVYl }kjk vU;= 40@60 QqV lM+d ij MsMhdsVsM ikfdZax miyC/k djk;s tkus rFkk ikfdZax LFky ls gksVy rd ikdZ ,.M jkbZM O;oLFkk fd;s tkus dh fLFkfr esa 40@60 QhV ls de pkSM+h lM+dksa ij gSfjVst gksVy vuqKs; gksaxsA
35

Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


9- ch-,l-;w-ih- 'kSYVj Q.M%
gSfjVst gksVy@fjlksVZ@ekWVy@,E;wtesUV ikdZ ds fy, ch-,l-;w-ih- 'kSYVj Q.M dsoy ldy fufeZr {ks=Qy ij ns; gksxkA vU; i;ZVu bdkbZ;ksa ;Fkk gksVy@dUosU'ku lsUVj@jsLVksjsUV vFkok dSQsVsfj;k vkfn ds fy, ch-,l-;w-ih- 'kSYVj Q.M izpfyr fu;ekuqlkj fy;k tkosxkA
10- i;ZVu bdkbZ gsrq lEifjofrZr ,oa vkoafVr Hkwfe dh yht jkf'k laLFkkfud iz;kstukFkZ fu/kkZfjr vkjf{kr nj ds vk/kkj ij yh tk;sxhA
mDr vkns'k jkT; dh i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr tkjh gksus dh fnukad ls jkT; ds lHkh uxjh; fudk;ksa ¼fodkl izkf/kdj.kksa@uxj fodkl U;klksa@jktLFkku vkoklu e.My@LFkkuh; fudk;ksa½ ij ykxw gksxsA mijksDr lHkh uxjh; fudk; vius Lrj ls vU; dksbZ vkns'k tkjh ugha djsxsa ,oa mDr vkns'k dh iw.kZ ikyuk lqfuf'pr djsxsaA i;ZVu bdkbZ uhfr] 2007 ds rgr vkosfnr izdj.kksa ds fy, bl uhfr ds rgr iqu% vkosnu djus dh vko';drk ugha gksxhA
jkT;iky dh vkKk ls]
¼v’kksd tSu½ vfrfjDr eq[; lfpo



















36

Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


DEPARTMENT OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND PANCHAYATI RAJ

NOTIFICATION

No.F.4( )Tourism rules/Legal/PR/2015/486 Jaipur, Dated: 10.7.2015
In exercise of the powers conferred by section 102 of the Rajasthan Panchayati Raj Act, 1994 (Act No. 13 of 1994), the State Government hereby makes the following rules, namely:
1. Short title and commencement.-
(1) These rules may be called the Rajasthan Panchayati Raj (Allotment, Change of Use of Land and Regularization of Abadi Land in Panchayat Area for Tourism Units) Rules, 2015.
(2) They shall come into force at once.
2. Definition.-
(1) In these rules, unless the context otherwise requires,-
(I) "Act" means the Rajasthan Panchayati Raj Act, 1994 (Act No. 13 of 1994);
(ii) "Allotting Authority" means an officer or authority, authorised by the State Government for the purpose of allotment, change of use of land and regularization of abadi land in Panchayat area for Tourism Units;
(iii) "Authorised Officer" means an officer or authority, authorised by the State Government for the purpose of change of use of land and regularization;
(iv) "rules" means the Rajasthan Panchayati Raj Rules, 1996;
(v) "Tourism Department” means Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan; and
(vi) “tourism unit” means a tourism project as such approved by the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan or by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India.
(2) Words and expressions used but not defined in these rules have the same meanings as are respectively assigned to them in the Act and Rajasthan Panchayati Raj Rules, 1996.
3. Allotment of abadi land for tourism units.-
(1) For establishment and development of tourism units, the District Collector in consultation with the Panchayati Raj Institution concern, shall identify suitable land in abadi area of a village for the establishment of tourism units and the land so identified

37

Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


shall be set apart and reserved for tourism units under intimation to the Tourism Department and same shall be uploaded on the web-site of the District Collector, Zila Parishad, Department of Panchayati Raj and Tourism Department of Government of Rajasthan. The maximum and minimum land areas to be reserved for Tourism Units shall be as under:

S. No. Category Minimum Land Area Maximum Land Area
1 2 3 4
1. Budget Hotels and 1 to 3 star hotels 1,200 square meters Up to 4,000 square meters
2. 4 star Hotels 6,000 square meters Up to 12,000 square meters
3. 5 Star and above hotels 18,000 square meters Up to 40,000 square meters
4. Other Tourism units - As per requirement/ availability

(2) The reserve price for allotment of land set apart and reserved for Tourism units shall be equal to the rates recommended for assessment of market value of abadi land by district level committee (DLC) under rule 58 of the Rajasthan Stamp Rules, 2004.
(3) Allotment of land for tourism units shall be made in the following manner, namely:-
(a) The Allotting Authority shall invite bids for allotment of land set-apart and reserved for tourism units under sub-rule (1), through advertisement published in National and State level news paper. The reserve price for allotment of land shall be mentioned in the advertisement.
(b) In case of more than one bid received within the specified time period, the allotment of land shall be made through competitive bidding. In case only single bid is received in the specified time period, the allotment of land shall be made to the single bidder on the prevailing reserve price or the price offered by the bidder, whichever is higher.
(c) Land allotted under this rule shall be used for establishment of tourism unit within the time limit specified as under,-
(i) three years for a tourism unit having less than 200 rooms;

38

Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


(ii) four years for a tourism unit having more than 200 rooms:
Provided that above period may, in appropriate case, further be extended for a period up to one year on payment of 0.5% per quarter of the price of the land allotted, by the officer or authority authorized by the State Government. If the land is not used within such extended period, the allotment shall be withdrawn and price paid in lieu of land shall be forfeited after giving an opportunity of being heard.
(d) Land allotted under this rule shall be used only for the purpose of tourism unit and not for any other purpose at least for a period of thirty years.
4. Change of use of land of Heritage Properties into Heritage Hotels.-
(1) Notwithstanding anything contained in the Rajasthan Panchayati Raj Rules, 1996, if a person holding title or any person, who lawfully holding a heritage property, situated on land in abadi area of a village, applies in writing on a plain paper to the Authorised Officer for change of use of land of Heritage Property into a Heritage Hotel along with title document and recommendation of the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan, an order for change of use of land may be issued by the Authorised Officer. No charges shall be payable for change of use of land under this rule. The Heritage property allowed to be used as a Heritage Hotel under this rule may be used for commercial purpose up to maximum of 1000 sq. meters or 10 percent of plinth area of the existing heritage building whichever is less.
(2) Change of use of land for the purpose of establishment of Hertage Hotel shall be permitted if there is 30 feet wide approach road is available:
Provided that in case of Heritage Hotels, if parking arrangement is made available by the owner in premises or elsewhere and arrange for a dedicated alternative parking on a 40/60 feet wide road and provide for the park-and-ride system from hotel to parking place, the requirement of width of approach road shall not be applicable.
(3) The person allowed to use for setting up of a Heritage Hotel under sub-rule (1) shall setup that Heritage Hotel within a period of three years:
Provided that the said period may be extended by the State Government for a period of one year on the application of the person who was permitted to setup Heritage Hotel. If the said heritage property is not use within such extended period, the order permitting to setup Heritage Hotel shall be withdrawn or revoked by the Authorised Officer.
(4) Notwithstanding anything contained in sub-rule (1), if the Authorised Officer, fails to

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Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


dispose off the application for change of use of land for the establishment of Heritage Hotel within fourty five days from the date of the receipt of the completed application along with required documents, then such change of use of land shall be deemed as allowed.
5. Change of use of land or tourism units.-
(1) When any person lawfully holding abadi land in a village intend to use the same for establishment of a tourism unit, he may do so after seeking permission of the Authorised Officer.
(2) Change of use of land for the purpose of establishment of tourism units shall be permitted if there is 30 feet wide approach road is available.
(3) No charges for change of use of land for Tourism Unit shall be payable.
(4) The person allowed to set up a tourism unit under sub-rule (1) shall establish that Tourism Unit within a period of three years:
Provided that the said period may be extended by the State Government for a period of one year on the application of the person who was permitted to use the land for Tourism Unit. If the said land is not use within such extended period, the order permitting change of use of land shall be withdrawn or revoked by the Authorised Officer.
(5) Notwithstanding anything contained in sub-rule (1), if the Authorised Officer, fails to dispose of the application for change of use of land for the establishment of tourism unit as defined in rule 2 within fourty five days from the date of the receipt of the completed application along with required documents, then such change of use of land shall be deemed as allowed.
6. Regularization of existing heritage Hotels.- If a person holding title or any person, who lawfully holding a heritage property and residential land and building that are running and operating as hotels without permission, situated on abadi area of a village before the commencement of the Rajasthan Panchayati Raj (Amendment) Ordinance, 2015 (Ordinance No. 3 of 2015) and fulfill the requirements as mentioned in rule 4 above, applies on plain paper for regularization of Change of use of land along with title document and recommendation of the Department of Tourism, Government of Rajasthan, an order for regularization of change of use of land may be issued by the Authorised Officer.

By order of the Governor, (S. K. Solanki)
Joint Secretary to the Government
40

Rajasthan Tourism Unit Policy 2015


jktLFkku ljdkj
Lok;Ùk 'kklu foHkkx] jkt0 t;iqjA
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Meghalaya Tourism Policy



The Tourism Policy of Meghalaya






A simple plan with simple tools results in a masterpiece


















GOVERNMENT OF MEGHALAYA TOURISM DEPARMENT

No.Tourism.74/2009/85, Dated Shillong, the 1st February, 2011

The Draft Tourism Policy which was issued by the Government of Meghalaya on 30.11.2010 through its website has received several views and comments from the general public. Such views and suggestions have been examined and relevant suggestions have been incorporated. The Governor of Meghalaya is, therefore, pleased to finalise and announce Meghalaya Tourism Policy, 2011 below, which will take effect from the date of publication.


-Sd-
S.M.Pathaw
Under Secretary to the Govt. of Meghalaya Tourism Department

MEGHALAYA TOURISM POLICY – 2011

1. Introduction

Tourism in India is a growing industry, and as per World Tourism Organisation predictions, India will be a leader in using tourism as an employment generator. The State of Meghalaya must be placed in a strategic position to take advantage of this growth.

Tourism being a multi sectoral activity has the capacity to stimulate different sectors of the economy. It is evident from highly developed states and countries that tourism opens up immense opportunities for economic development, poverty alleviation and income generation. Being labour intensive, it opens avenues for a host of employment opportunities. Tourism can also make a positive impact on conserving the environment, cultural enrichment, development of rural areas and empowerment of women.

Meghalaya the “Abode of the Clouds” with its picturesque landscape of rolling hills, meandering rivers, cascading waterfalls, lush forests, diverse flora and fauna and unique culture and tradition has great potential for development of tourism. During the last few years, Meghalaya has evolved as a fast growing destination for both domestic and international tourists. The first Tourism Policy was framed in the year 2001 which was published vide Government Notification No.Tourism.136/96/264 dated 15th February 2001. With the evolving role of the tourism sector as a major engine of economic growth, it was felt necessary to revamp the existing tourism policy and come up with a new policy within which the Government helps to create the basic

infrastructure for tourism development, while the private sector helps to provide quality products and offer active support services.

Keeping in mind the requirement to provide economic opportunities to the local communities as also the need to preserve the eco-system and the ethnic identity of the people, the tourism policy has been designed to sustain the rich cultural heritage and biodiversity of the state.

2. Vision

To position Meghalaya as a preferred tourist destination by taking advantage of its rich cultural heritage and natural beauty.

3. Guiding Principles

Realising Tourism’s potential as a key promoter for economic growth of the state, the Government of Meghalaya envisages the following key principles to bring about responsible growth in this sector.

The key principles are:

a) Government will create basic infrastructure for tourism development and also act as a facilitator for private investment in this sector.

b) Private sector will provide the quality products and offer active support services.

c) Encouragement and assistance will be provided to promote entrepreneurship within the local communities in the field of tourism. Importance will also be given to tourism projects which are based on community participation.

d) Tourism development will be undertaken in a manner so as to ensure sustainability and conservation of the state’s environment and natural resources. Development of tourism activities around natural resources will be done in conjunction with the relevant Government Departments and in concurrence with any laws relating to protection and conservation. Sustainable development of tourism will also help generate employment for the local people without impacting on environment and local culture.

e) To encourage hotel operators to ‘go green’ by strictly adhering to minimum standards with regards to environmental performance and health standards. This will include use of renewable energy sources, overall reduction in

energy and water consumption, measures to harvest rainwater, measures to reduce waste and provision of non-smoking areas etc.

f) Tourism development will aim to take full advantage of the opportunities presented by strategic regional policies and development agencies such as the NEIIPP (North East Industrial and Investment Promotion Policy 2007), the State Industrial Policy, the Forest and Wildlife protection Policies, NEC (North East Council) and Ministry of DONER. It will also participate in Central Government initiatives/funding with regard to tourism.

g) Meghalaya will build on its existing strengths to develop tourism by promoting a clean, healthy and safe environment along with friendly and efficient services.

h) Meghalaya Tourism will aim to develop a unique brand focusing on selected niches and products in order to attract visitors to the state while differentiating itself, where necessary, from its neighbours.

i) Construction works relating to tourism projects may be designed in such a way that the structure will merge with the surroundings and the natural environment of the area so as to present a good ambience, taking into consideration the need for durability and sustainability of the structure in a particular environment.

4. General Objectives

After due consideration of the above key principles, the broad objectives for the development of tourism in the State are as follows:

a) To establish a holistic growth of the industry with the cooperation of the private sector/community and other stakeholders.

b) To develop an effective marketing strategy linked with regional and national initiatives through a collaborative mechanism to project a positive identity for Meghalaya in the national and international tourism markets as a unique and preferred destination.

c) To strengthen the quality and attractiveness of tourism experience in Meghalaya including improvements to be brought about in the conservation of the environment.

d) To identify and promote new opportunities for the future development of tourism in Meghalaya on a sustainable basis.

e) To strengthen the cultural aspects of the tourism product in Meghalaya and to actively promote local participation, including community-based tourism.

f) To develop a tourism plan in concurrence with the objectives of the policy.

g) To ensure greater emphasis on capacity building/training to local youth and tourism stakeholders in the State.

h) To ensure acceptable service levels, training and human resource development will be provided on an ongoing basis.

i) To take full advantage of the various institutes in the state like the Indian Institute of Management, Institute of Hotel Management, Martin Luther Christian University, Food Craft Institute (Tura), to develop courses and implement training in various categories of service providers.

j) To make the tourism industry in Meghalaya a leader in responsible environmental practices.

k) To establish a set of best practices in the tourism sector.

5. Strategies

a) To survey all potential areas of tourist attraction in the entire state in order to prepare a master plan for integrated tourism development. The focus will be on development of destinations and circuit development not only within the state but with major circuits of the neighbouring states particularly Assam.

b) To create and improve infrastructure along with better management of mega tourism projects. Availability of quality infrastructure is a vital component for the development of tourism. The aim of the Department is to facilitate building world class tourism infrastructure and efficient transportation facilities.

c) A well-designed plan for capacity building and manpower training will help make tourism development successful. The aim of the HRD plan will be to create an efficient and professional manpower base in the tourism sector.

d) Joint venture in cases where unique products involving special proprietary information or brand image are needed to be introduced to a location.

e) To include tourism as an industry so that stake holders can take advantage of the various incentives under the Industrial Policy (NEIIPP). Including tourism as an industry will increase capital flow into this sector by inviting investors and this in turn will increase the employment generating capacity of the sector.

f) To identify and promote new opportunities and products for the future development of tourism in Meghalaya. The major tourism products in Meghalaya are festivals, wildlife, culture and lifestyle of the people. The State also has potential to offer new products, the thrust areas should be rural/village tourism, MICE tourism, Eco tourism, Wellness tourism, Adventure tourism, Pilgrimage tourism etc. Emphasis is on eco-tourism, nature tourism and rural tourism through community initiatives and partnerships and encouraging small and micro enterprises and promotion of self employment schemes.

g) To develop an effective marketing strategy so as to project a positive image for Meghalaya in the international and national market as a unique and preferred destination to visit. The marketing plan will be developed after a thorough investigation of the tourism products in Meghalaya and the markets that Meghalaya is targeting. The plan will include promotion of festivals and tribal sports, promotion of local handicrafts and cuisine, familiarisation tours for tour operators from outside the state for better knowledge of the places of tourist interest in Meghalaya.

h) Up-gradation of visitor facilities in all tourist destinations, improve information and signages.

i) To strengthen the quality and attractiveness of the tourism experience in Meghalaya, convergence with other Government Departments is needed in the areas of security, air and road connectivity, health and hygiene and conservation of environment. This will include-

• Launching of a state wide campaign to keep Meghalaya clean and beautiful. All stakeholders will have to contribute to this effort.

• To educate and assist local communities to take up afforestation programs.

• Support for programmes and information aiming to limit health and safety risks in the state including the elimination of malaria, control the spread of HIV/AIDS and improvement of road safety.
• Efforts shall be made for improvement in air connectivity to the state as well as good road connectivity to all the tourist destinations within the State by actively pursuing with the concerned departments.
• Protection and promotion of caves in collaboration professional and experts in the field and the local community. with

j) The Department will set up an Advisory Board which will provide direction towards development of tourism industry in the State and take the responsibility of bringing in or facilitating synergy and co-ordination with other inter-related departments.

k) Tourism infrastructure shall be designed in such a way that the construction will merge with the surroundings and the natural environment of the area so as to present a good ambience, taking into consideration the need for durability and sustainability of the structure in a particular environment

6. Tourism Security

In order to avoid any form of harassment to tourists visiting the state, the Department of Tourism, Govt. of Meghalaya in collaboration with the local authorities will sensitise the people to treat tourists with due courtesy and decorum and also to guide and provide requisite assistance in case of any emergency encountered by them. Any complaint lodged by the tourists shall be attended to promptly so that they are not harassed. A specialised wing in the form of Tourist Police may also be created if necessary for effective security to tourists. Preventive measures, including the involvement of local communities and spreading awareness about the benefits of tourism, will be actively promoted.

7. Product Development

Meghalaya will constantly aim to improve the tourism products it offers as well as build new products and services to target the different categories of tourists. An improved investment climate is a factor that will facilitate the development of the tourism product in Meghalaya. The investment climate can be improved by developing a plan for the State which will include:

• identifying areas with investment potential,

• identify investors that fit with the development philosophy of the state,

• prohibiting certain types of activities which are environmentally unsafe.

Potential areas for the future development of tourism products in Meghalaya include:

• Adventure/Sports Tourism – Meghalaya has immense potential for adventure related activities including adventure sports like rock climbing, paragliding, zip lining, mountain cycling, canoeing, water skiing, etc. Some of the popular adventure activities being promoted in the state are hard and soft treks, rock climbing, boat race and indigenous sports of the Khasis, Jaintias and Garos. Caving at present is the most vibrant and visible tourism activity in the state, followed by nature walks and treks on the numerous living root bridges. While promoting adventure sports, it is important to ensure maintenance of international standards of safety, quality and service by strictly following guidelines issued by the Ministry of Tourism. The Govt. will assist educated unemployed youths through scholarships for training in adventure sports to open up a source of livelihood for them. MTDC will support and promote water sports and angling. The Corporation in collaboration with Sports & Youth Affairs shall hold annual water sport events.

• Wildlife/Eco-Tourism- With a large area of the state covered under forest, Meghalaya has diverse wildlife. Apart from the well known Balpakram National Park in South Garo Hills, there are the Nokrek Biosphere Reserve (West Garo Hills), the Siju Wildlife Sanctuary (South Garo Hills) and the Nongkhyllem Wildlife Sanctuary in Ri Bhoi District. Tourism facilities are to be developed around the Balpakram National Park and in other National Parks and Sanctuaries with individual speciality which shall be integrated as a tourism product. Tourism Department to co-ordinate with the Forest Department for further development and improvement of the existing infrastructure for the convenience of tourists. Preservation and conservation of Sacred Groves to be given priority.

• Cultural Tourism (Fairs and Festivals) - Meghalaya resonates with fairs and festivals which are celebrated throughout the year. The four major festivals of the three tribes of Meghalaya are the Wangala Dance (Garo), Shad Suk Mynsiem and Nongkrem Dance Festival (Khasi), and the Behdeinkhlam Festival(Jaintia). Music is an integral part of the people of Meghalaya and it accompanies every festival and ceremony. These festivals also provide a glimpse of Meghalaya’s lively collection of woven, decorative, dyed and colourful silk and cotton, their elaborate jewellery etc. More thrust to be given on publicity to make festivals a major attraction for tourists. There is a need to make them more attractive targeting tourist on well defined themes and spread over all seasons. The time and dates will be fixed and organised in a professional manner and will be given wide publicity. The calendar of events will be prepared ahead of time with the concurrence of the organisers keeping in mind its effectiveness and purpose.

• Meetings, Incentives, Conventions & Exhibition Tourism (MICE) - Meghalaya being one of the preferred destinations of the North East, and with tourist arrival increasing substantially every year, the demand for facilities for MICE has also increased
.The Department will take steps for setting up modern convention facilities at strategic locations.

• Wellness, Health & Herbal Tourism – Spa holidays are becoming popular these days. Meghalaya has immense potential in this segment and can be a leading player in health and wellness tourism where professionally devised programmes can be initiated and delivered like yoga centres, ayurvedic treatments, rejuvenating treatments etc.

• Bestowed with an abundant variety of medicinal plants, the state could promote Health & Herbal Tourism. The indigenous people with their inherent knowledge for herbal medicines and massages that provides holistic healing and rejuvenation will be encouraged and promoted. Areas and locations having valuable medicinal plants will be identified for the purpose of conducting educational herbal trails. Existing herbal medicinal centres will be encouraged in a regulated manner which shall form part of an important component of wellness tourism.

• Unique Lodging Products – A variety of accommodation depicting traditional style and decor of the major tribes – the Khasi,

Jaintia, and Garo to be constructed by the government or on PPP mode which will have a unique selling proposition.

• Local Souvenir Tourism – Shopping is recognised as an integral part of tourism experience and a valued contributor to employment, income and revenue. Local markets held at various sites selling indigenous items will be included as an itinerary in the tourism conducted tours. The existing indigenous crafts produced by the local people such as pottery, basketry, handloom and weaving etc. will be promoted and developed.

• Golf Tourism - Meghalaya has one of the oldest 18-hole golf courses in the country. The Shillong Golf Course together with very favourable climatic conditions has the potential of attracting ardent golfers from corporate houses within the country and from neighbouring countries. With improved air connectivity, this would attract high-end tourists to the state.

• Pilgrimage Tourism – Meghalaya has potential for pilgrimage tourism in Garo Hills and Jaintia Hills which are already visited by many pilgrims seasonally. Promotion of pilgrimage tourism will be undertaken with basic amenities in these locations to attract more pilgrims. These amenities will be managed efficiently in coordination with the local authority. Special festivals will be given wide publicity to attract national and international tourists throughout the year.

• Legend Tourism - Legend tourism is a unique venture to create an innovative Tourism product based on legends and folklores. Meghalaya is very rich in age old traditions, beliefs, and customs which still exist in various forms. There are a variety of tourist destinations from caves to monoliths, waterfalls to rock formations, each with its own set of legends. The bonding that exists between the land and people makes it all the more significant to package this most picturesque state with its interesting legends. These legends will be inscribed on stone tablets at the respective destinations or documented and printed in the form of booklets.

• Heritage Tourism – Heritage Tourism is the oldest form of travel. In Meghalaya, particularly Shillong there are a number of important buildings, monuments, churches, etc., associated with well known personalities and events from the past. The Department will take steps to promote places, monuments, etc. connected with

famous personalities to promote Meghalaya as a destination for Heritage Tourism.

• Music Tourism – People of Meghalaya are known for their love of music. The Shillong Chamber Choir has put Shillong on the music map. Musical talent needs to be nurtured and recognised so that parents can encourage their children to take up music full time. The Department of Arts & Culture will be tapped to promote music festival in Meghalaya.

• Strawberry Tourism – Strawberry in Meghalaya is an economic success history. Strawberry cultivation is enthusiastically taken up by many farmers especially in Ri-Bhoi District. Strawberry Tourism can be promoted where farm houses could be encouraged to take in guests who could enjoy the experience of strawberry harvesting. With the involvement of the Horticulture Department a Strawberry Festival shall be organised as an annual event.

• Premium Tourist Destinations - This is a new area of tourism product providing clean, fresh, peaceful, unpolluted and invigorating atmosphere, such resorts to be developed for high end tourists. Constructions will be developed in accordance with the landscape local architecture and 90% green component. Traditional local material will be utilised.

• Package Tours - With the objective of boosting tourist traffic, attractive package tours will be developed with the help of MTDC, private sector and travel operators. The packages shall be designed keeping in mind the varied interests and budget of the tourists which will be updated from time to time.

• Cuisine Tourism - Tourism Department will organise traditional food festivals which will include ethnic food where local cuisines of the Khasi, Jaintia and Garo will be promoted.

• Film Tourism - Promote Meghalaya as a film destination. Besides gaining wide publicity for the state, the local community also benefits economically from the crew during their stay.

• Weekend/Day Tourism - There are many locations for weekend retreats/day trips in and around the capital viz Umiam, Cherrapunjee, Mawsynram, Nartiang, Jakrem, Mawlynnong, Ialong, etc which are popular amongst tourists. State Government

will further develop these spots as well as promote new destinations preferably with involvement of the private sector on a PPP mode.

8. Village/Rural Tourism-Home Stay

Village/Rural Tourism has emerged as a new concept in the tourism industry. In this context, Meghalaya is fast evolving as a responsible and sustainable tourism product with an important social objective through people’s participation. Rural tourism can be effectively implemented to boost tourism in the state. Rural tourism will ensure the dispersal of tourists from the city to villages enabling them to familiarise themselves with the unique culture and heritage prevalent so that they are rejuvenated and culturally enriched. The prime objective is to harness the vast untapped rural tourism prospective of the state so that their multiplier benefit filters out directly to the rural communities. Similar programmes taken up by NGOs and other agencies will also be streamlined by bringing them under one umbrella for convergence in the development and promotion of the product.

9. Community Participation in Tourism

The land tenure system prevalent in the State is tilted towards the community with the Government having very little or no land at all. As a result the community plays a very important role in development and promotion of community based tourism. With community providing the land, the role of the government is building capacities so as to enable the local people to run tourism related projects.

10. Meghalaya Tourism Development Corporation(MTDC)

Meghalaya Tourism Development Corporation has been set up for developing and promotion of Tourism in Meghalaya. The Corporation shall make efforts to increase its revenue to enable to carry out promotional activities. MTDC will organise package tours not only to Cherrapunjee but to other tourist destinations, organise training for guides, etc. The Government shall initiate implementation of online reservation of MTDC units. This will serve as an opportunity for tourist to book accommodation online for real time confirmation. The Government will continue to assist the Corporation subject to availability of fund.

11. Promotion and Investment through Public Private Partnership (PPP) Mode

The Department of Tourism, Government of Meghalaya has initiated development of tourism projects following the Public Private Partnership (PPP) mode. The enormous tourism potential together with a peaceful and secure atmosphere is an ideal environment for investment in the state. The Department will facilitate the development of tourism infrastructure projects on a PPP mode.

12. Capacity Building and Training

• The quality of the tourism product will be improved at all levels from management to staff services. For this purpose, appropriate trainings will be conducted under the Hunar Se Rozgar Scheme of the Govt. of India, assistance from NEC etc. in collaboration with IHM, Shillong and FCI, Tura. Improvement in service will give tourists a feel good experience inviting them to be regular visitors.

• At present the Institute of Hotel Management (IHM) in Shillong offers a three year BSc degree programme in Hotel Management, Applied Nutrition, and Catering Technology. The BSc degree should be upgraded to a post graduate course to be funded by Ministry of Tourism, Govt. of India. Additional Food Craft Institutes will be set up in selected districts of the state depending on the requirement.

• Scholarships would be provided to eligible youth preferably educated unemployed for undertaking specialised courses in the hospitality sector. Specific amount of fund will be allocated by the Department for this purpose.

• Undertaking training needs to assess the gap between the knowledge, skills and attitudes of the service providers in the tourism sector and to determine the number and types of workers that require knowledge and skill development to meet the sector’s objectives.

• On this basis, proposals will be drawn up for addressing the identified training needs of the tourism sector, including in-service training for existing employees, basic training for new entrants and courses for government officials, police officers, tour guides, taxi drivers etc. The private sector will be expected to register their employees for training.

• Working in co-ordination with the Hotel and Tourism Association/ Stakeholders to introduce and monitor appropriate standards and classification systems for the tourism sector.

• Reviewing the licensing and other regulations that have impact on the tourism industry and making recommendations for improvement.

• Provide training and establish standards for transport operators, tour operators, guides, entrepreneurs for food and beverage and hospitality services.

• Service Providers in adventure tourism, wellness tourism, etc. should have appropriate training from recognised institutes.

13. Solid Waste Management

Waste is an issue of increasing importance in the hospitality industry. Government will encourage hotels, resorts etc. to preserve the environment by implementing effective solid waste management through waste minimization, reuse, recycling etc. The Department will promote awareness programmes aimed at educating and sensitizing the staff, visitors and guests about the importance of proper management of waste and introducing the system of segregating waste into different categories at hotel rooms by guests themselves. The Department will initiate a set of guidelines on waste management for guidance of all stake holders.

14. Improvement of connectivity through development of Heliports

The Department of Tourism will submit proposals to Government of India for the development of heliports at tourist destinations which are not well connected by roads, etc.

15. Safe, Honourable and Responsible Tourism

This involves people’s participation in issues that affect their lives and property, making contribution to the conservation of the environment, preservation of cultural heritage, consideration of the needs of physically challenged people, mutual respect between the locals and tourists, respect for the rights and safety of tourists and freedom from exploitation of both tourists and locals.

16. Incentives & Concessions to local entrepreneurs

The Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion in the Ministry of Commerce and Industry has approved a package of fiscal incentives and other concessions for the North East Region viz. the North East Industrial and Investment Promotion Policy 2007. Under this Policy, incentives for Service Sector has been covered for Hotels(not below 2-Star Category) Adventure and Leisure Sports including Ropeways, Vocational Training Institutes such as Institutes for Hotel Management, Catering and Food Crafts. Other incentives are 100% income tax exemption, capital investment subsidy, interest subsidy and comprehensive insurance.

The Department of Tourism will provide incentives to entrepreneurs for new projects in the Tourism sector for infrastructure development. The incentives will be subsidy limiting the amount to 30% of the project cost for approved projects within the amount of Rs 1.00 Crores to 1.50 Crores.

Tourism Department will provide assistance for purchase of multi utility vehicles to approved resort owners/hotel owners/tour operators limiting the amount to 25% which will be the deposit amount to financial institutions providing loans for purchase of vehicles for tourism purposes.

The Tourism Department will provide incentives to registered house owners who are willing to provide Hospitality in the form of Bed ‘n’ Breakfast in all the prominent tourist destinations. Such owners shall initially be trained and should be willing to provide the basic amenities identified by the Department.

17. Awards & Appreciations

Awards will be instituted for categories like best maintained tourist spot, best innovative tourism project, best eco-tourism product, best hotel, best transport operator, best tour operator, best travel agency, best restaurant promoting local cuisine etc. as an incentive for good performance.

18. Creating a Brand Meghalaya - Cherrapunjee

A brand image of Meghalaya on the lines of ‘Incredible India’ will be created by identifying a suitable tagline, catchy slogans, signature tunes etc. with innovative and market focused ad-campaigns. Proactive promotional measures will be undertaken for creating the image of the state as a safe and enjoyable destination duly supported by good infrastructure and facilities at the destination. The Department will take steps to develop a brand image for Cherrapunjee.

Brand Meghalaya should portray the state’s unique selling points in order to maximize the returns.

19. Other Initiatives

To ensure accurate data of tourist arrivals relating to nationality, length of stay and purpose of visit, the Tourism Department, which is at present collecting data from hotels within the city, will also include the guest houses and tourist information centres from all district offices in the state. Coordination with local tourism NGOs and SHGs with the Directorate of Tourism to be initiated at different tourist locations for provision of guides, setting up of garbage bins, public facilities for the convenience of tourists. Necessary signages, warnings and cautions will be set at all key locations and points.

20. Land Bank

Land is the most vital requisite for setting of tourism units. A land bank for tourism development is to be created by acquiring land at various places.

21. Publicity

Marketing of tourism products will continue through advertisements in travel magazines, leading publications, electronic media, publications of pamphlets and brochures, participation in international and national fairs and festivals, road shows, posting of information in the website and through state tourism offices (Tourist Information Centre), assistance to major festivals and organising tourism festivals within the state.

22. Implementation of the Meghalaya Tourism Policy 2011

The Tourism Department, Govt. of Meghalaya will be the nodal department for implementation of the Tourism Policy.

23. Commencement of the Policy

The Meghalaya Tourism Policy 2011 will commence on the date of publication.

Goa Tourism Policy

Draft for discussion






Preparation of Goa’s Tourism Master Plan and Policy
Draft Report – Final Presentation and report on Module 3: Development of Draft Tourism Master Plan for Goa

Department of Tourism, Government of Goa











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1. This report has been prepared exclusively for the Department of Tourism (“Client”) based on the terms of the Request for Proposal dated 7 June 2013 issued by the Department of Tourism, KPMG Advisory Service Ltd.’s (“KPMG” or “we”) proposal for services dated 18 June 2013, the Work Order issued to KPMG dated 24 July 2014, and the consultancy contract dated 2 June 2015 (collectively ‘Contract’).
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Table of contents





1.



Development model Development Strategies
Qualitative tourism goals
• Positioning
• Products
• Markets
Quantitative tourism goals
Development principles & guidelines



2.

Core tourism Infrastructure Tourism programs
Investment and funding analysis
Phasing
Tourism circuits


Table of contents




3.

Support tourism infrastructure Core infrastructure
Transport and connectivity
Human resource and training
Transversal tourism infrastructure


4.
Commercialization & Promotion Tourism intelligence unit
Destination C&P
Products C&P

5. Facilitating Tourism policies and application framework




























1.



Development
model Development Strategies
Qualitative tourism goals
• Positioning
• Products
• Markets
Quantitative tourism goals
Development principles & guidelines



Key strategies for development of the Master Plan
















Benchmarking principles


• All selected destinations are well known for their wide offering in Coastal and Sun & Beach tourism

• The benchmark is based on an analysis of the official websites for each destination

• It is assumed that the website is one of the major tools used by tourism destinations organizations to promote and highlight products and experiences. Therefore, we can ensure that destination website is essential to position the brand







An analysis has been conducted in order to understand the key attributes in each destination website.
“High presence” - attribute appears in the main page or in a highlighted area. Medium presence - navigation process through different search menus. Low presence - difficult to find or it limited availability


Country

Sri
Lanka


Bali


Ibiza


Kerala


Maldives


Mauritius


Thailand


Goa





Nautical Tourism

Core attributes







Business & MICE







High
presence


Medium presence



Low
presence


Benchmark observations
• All listed destinations are known for their coastal tourism offer. However, Sun & Beach (Coastal) tourism is not enhanced as the core attribute of these destinations.
• It is assumed that the destination has “taken for granted” that tourists know about this offer and they choose to highlight
other products which they want to promote.
• All these destinations give high or medium importance to Culture & Heritage (except Maldives), Sports & Adventure and Nautical Tourism (except Sri Lanka and Thailand)
• All these destinations present a high diversification in their product portfolio across 6-10 products with high / medium presence
• Within this context, some websites concentrate their web communication in limited products to enhance them:
 Maldives highlights luxury tourism
 Kerala focuses on Culture & Heritage
 Thailand emphasizes Shopping
• Nightlife is not highlighted greatly, even in destinations like Ibiza or Thailand, famed for this feature. This could probably denote that either they do not need to promote these features as they are already well known (similar to Sun & Beach tourism product); or that they do not prefer advertising this type of product due to possible negative connotations.
• Goa’s website provides a wide set of activities within the “Explore” and “Things to do” sections. The home page does not focus on specific positioning in terms of its destination or its products, “White water rafting” appears as the first highlighted product.

Positioning matrix: Goa aims to become a multi-product destination, where culture & heritage and leisure & entertainment would play a major new role



Coastal Tourism (incl. Sun & Beach, Nature, Sports & Adventure)

Sri Lanka
Bali
Ibiza
Kerala
Maldives
Mauritius
Thailand
Goa (today)
Goa (future)

Nature Based Tourism (incl. Nature Based)

Culture & Heritage (incl. Culture & Heritage, Culinary Tourism)

Sri Lanka
Bali
Ibiza
Kerala
Maldives
Mauritius
Thailand
Goa (today)
Goa (future)

Leisure & Entertainment (incl. Nightlife, Shopping, Health & Wellness)




Qualitative tourism goals - Positioning matrix – Goa’s positioning vs type of visitor

High intensity Medium intensity

Current Future

International Domestic International Domestic Marketing Strategy

Low intensity

1
Coastal Tourism







Qualitative tourism goals - Repositioning Goa as a multi-product destination




• Evolve from a majorly Sun & Beach tourism destination to a Coastal tourism destination



Proposed evolution of Goa as a Tourism Destination

• Develop a multi-product destination where Culture & Heritage will play a major role to attract both international and domestic tourists.

• More diversified and quality leisure & entertainment offer, mainly addressed for domestic tourists

• Nature-based tourism will be a focus product
















Qualitative tourism goals – Geographical markets strategy




Very Short term

Short term

Medium term


















Very short term: on going/ current markets
Short term: 2 - 4 years
Medium term: within 5 years

Keep addressing domestic market & current nationalities but with a different proactive marketing approach
Higher-spending segments within the coastal tourism product with a better and more diversified offer, including culture and nature tourism

Tap into the markets for short breaks and holidays with new direct flights from the


Develop the cultural tourism offer of Goa to attract these nationalities. This would be the main motivation to visit India – and Goa as an extension

Though most tourists would still stay on the coast, culture and nature-based tourism would be a main travel motivation for some tourists and complementary products for others.

Depending on identified new opportunities, further diversify markets such as Australia, through a multi-product destination, where cultural tourism would play a major differentiation role.

Middle East.


Products / geographical market strategy: attractiveness levels



High intensity Medium intensity Low intensity

Very short term markets (existing/ current)

Short term markets

Mid term











Quantitative tourism goals – for higher spending tourists with increased international tourism


Scenarios analysed for total tourist arrivals (2017 to 2031) – Current/ Normalized/ Optimistic
Current scenario Normalized scenario Optimistic scenario

• Tourist arrivals calculated based on DoT statistics; change in calculation methodology not factored
• Compounded Annual Growth Rate (“CAGR”) – 6.62% (1985 to 2015)
• 2031 projected total arrivals – 14.7mn • Tourist arrivals calculated post the normalisation of CAGR numbers due to additional sources of information from tourist entry points being considered in arriving at inbound tourist statistics; namely
• Railway stations
• KTCL bus transport services
• Private bus operators
• Vehicle tolls on State borders
• CAGR – 4.51% (2009 to 2013)
• 2031 projected total arrivals – 10.7mn
• Tourist arrivals calculated based on a CAGR which factors in the long term impact of the Tourism Master Plan
• CAGR – 7.00%
• 2031 projected total arrivals – 15.6mn
• The Current and Optimistic scenarios are fairly similar in absolute numbers, however the calculation methodology of the
total tourist arrivals in the Current scenario has not been uniform over the years.
• These changes in methodology have affected the historic CAGR, hence a CAGR using a normalized scenario has been applied for the purpose of projections
• The base for all scenarios are actual 2015 tourist arrival numbers, normalization has been conducted on the CAGR only.
Focus of tourism growth will be on
1. International tourism - Limited growth and increased number of higher spending
2. Domestic tourism - Limited growth and shift to higher spending
3. Healthy mix of domestic and international tourists from 90 – 10% (current) to 80 – 20% by 2031 Source : DoT Goa


Quantitative tourism goals - reducing seasonality



Seasonality benchmark goals
• Need for reducing seasonality – High seasonality features high congestion during peak season and lower asset utilization during periods of low demand

• Benchmark Seasonality –
• Jan to Mar – 25%
• Apr to Jun – 25%
• Jul to Sep – 15%
• Oct to Dec – 35%

• Methods to reduce Seasonality –
• Increased utilization of Culture, Heritage, Nature, Eco- tourism, MICE and Edutainment tourism products during the non Oct – Dec periods

• Increased arrivals at events like Carnival & Shigmotsav



Quantitative tourism goals – estimate of revenues*


Quantitative tourism goals*


Today Future potential


2016 base
5,536,837
Total arrivals

2031 goal
10,730,735
Total arrivals












Domestic International Domestic International


Visitor expenditure
INR 2,752/ day

ALS
5 days

Visitor expenditure
INR 4,197/ day

ALS
9 days

Visitor expenditure
INR 4,128/ day

ALS
5 days

Visitor expenditure
INR 8,257/ day

ALS
7 days




Total visitor expenditure
INR 9,060.21 cr

Total visitor expenditure
INR 30,125.71 cr

Quantitative tourism goals – impact on employment and GDP*



2021 2026 2031
Incremental employment creation
Employment: direct contribution 1,21,760 1,72,979 2,55,421
Employment: total contribution 3,52,463 5,00,731 7,36,483




2016 base 2021
goals 2026
goals 2031
goals CAGR 2016 -
2031 Multiplier Ratio
Total contribution to GDP
GDP: total contribution (in INR Cr.) 16,308 24,120 35,319 54,227 8.3% 3.32



(*) Normalized scenario (Ref. earlier slides) at constant prices

Source: Tourism Sector in India, Parliament library and reference, research, documentation, and information service

Quantitative tourism goals – tourism arrivals goals compared to other reference destinations



2015 (p) 2016 (e)

2015 (p) 2015 (p)

2026 (e)

2016/2026 (e)





3 Bali 4,001,000 4,601,000 7,147,100 11,148,100 Not
available

4 Ibiza 2,546,400 862,000 3,408,400 Not
available
5 Kerala
977,479
12,465,571
13,443,050 Not available



6 Maldives 1,303,000 1,350,000 2,200,000 +69%


7 Mauritius 1,154,000 1,173,000 1,700,000 +47%


8 Belize 316,000 315,000 450,000 +42%


















Principles

• Elaborate a tourism development plan that is acceptable to the stakeholders of Goa, with an emphasis on enhanced quality and quantity of higher spending tourists, both domestic and foreign
• Achieve this goal through a strong diversification of the tourism product using all relevant and varied tourism assets, wherever they are located
• Consider the entire State as a potential tourism development area, which implies changing the past and current development pattern focused on the coast
• Conserve the natural and cultural assets deemed of high value by stakeholders which act as major attractions
for tourism, on the coastal stretches not yet developed and in the hinterlands
• Address existing and future development requirements highlighted by creating physical plans that respond to that direction.
• Phase tourism development so that there are opportunities in the near term (2-5 years) and for a 10 year period from now.
• Take a broad look at sustainability, which implies ensuring low scale tourism development in the hinterlands of the State respectful not only with nature but also with the local culture, in line with the principles established in the Goa Regional Development Plan
• Provide a conceptual tourism planning model that considers all these principles at State, Taluka and local specific levels.
• Identify specific potential locations or locations’ profiles for redevelopment, enhancement and/or new
development.











• Nature sanctuaries in the hinterlands and the coast,
• Pristine beaches in certain talukas to be protected from high pressure in terms of possible development through high quality offerings

• Coastal areas: applies to parts of the coast, mainly in the upper North and mid/ extreme South, where no/ limited development is present.
• Hinterland areas (Ghats and Midlands): Applicable for developments in designated areas to create “clusters” of nature/ culture-based attractions/ activities
• Low density should also be paired with low rise buildings (Ground floor only or GF+1)

• Present on the Goan coast in stretches, as well as in some urban areas
• “Mass” development could be authorised in specific new designated places such as next to airport or development for specific programs

Density models – Built up units (such as apartment/ room) per hectare, thus shaping the landscape and scenery

Applicable to Hinterlands And Coastal Areas

In some Coastal/ Urban Areas/ near Airport High density (60+ units
/ha)














Revised Regional Plan density targets seem to be in line with tourism needs

Maximum permissible Built Up Area statements



Plot areas below 350 sqm
FAR (ratio) = 80



Plot areas below 4,000 sqm
FAR (ratio) = 80


Plot areas 4,000 sqm and above
FAR (ratio) = 60

Plot areas below 4,000 sqm
FAR (ratio) = 60


Plot areas 4,000 sqm and above
FAR (ratio) = 50


Source: Regional Plan for Goa 2021


Specific development guidelines for the Coast



Low- Medium density resorts developed and or operated by international brands to better position the destination with sustainable projects

“Marine nature and life parks” - Partially preserved beaches to offer an adapted environment for flora
and fauna (terrestrial and marine).



Ultra luxury
Eco-Beach


Nightlife/ Party



Pernem
Pernem


Bardez

Mapusa

Spatial Planning focus area


Bicholim

Bicholim Sattari


Territorial vision
Mass tourism development
Low- Medium tourism

• “Big club” resorts
• New generation campsites
• Beach Clubs
• Quality programmes to manage pollution levels, cleanliness and sanitation and definition of swim

North Goa
Panjim
Tiswadi
EntertainmentPonda
Vasco da Gama
MormuCguaolinary Ponda

Sattari






Dharbandora
Dharbandora

development
Very Low density development & Protected Areas

zones



Festivals/ beach events


Low density resorts

Culture &
Entertainment


Luxury accommodation & High end retail




Margaon
Salcette









Quepem








Sanguem
Sanguem



Integrated leisure destinations –
Beach access/ security/ cleaning/ quality of sea water/ toilets/ parking/ creation of jetties/ square with F&B facilities/ small markets/ watersports facilities including schools (sailing, surf, board) in some cases as part of an integrated project to welcome tourists



Beach Clubs Medium density
tourism

Eco-beach low
density

South Goa

Quepem

Chaudi
Canacona




Low density tourism development & protected areas:
• Hinterland areas - special interest and preserved / protected from mass tourism flows and developments.
• Attractions - local flora / fauna, a proper botanic garden, new protected
areas and special interest zones, marked trekking trails




Pernem
Pernem

Territorial vision
Karnataka



Bicholim

• Low density tourism eco-lodges with an orientation towards environmental and social promotion.




Panjim

Bicholim

North Goa




Sattari

• Agri tourism can also be promoted central areas of the state.
• Homestays meshing culture with tourism
Adventure & Sports tourism:
• Tourism activities and experiences which might cause greater territorial impact, proposaed in areas with lower environmental value.

Tiswadi

Vasco da Gama
Mormugao




Ponda

Ponda



Margaon
Salcette





Dharbandora
Dharbandora




Sanguem

• Improve existing experiences by upgrading products, facilities and
infrastructure.
Nature and Waterways Tourism
• In the vicinity of the Mopa airport, and along the River Chapora waterways can be developed to promote nature based tourism through promenades, jetties and river cruises.







Adventure & Sports tourism
Low density tourism Wildlife Sanctuaries/


Quepem


South Goa

Quepem

Chaudi
Canacona

Sanguem

National Park





Character images to illustate density development

• Low density tourism development & Protected areas
• Adventure & Sports tourism
• High end nature tourism






Specific development guidelines for the Hinterlands: Culture-Based Tourism



• Key heritage / cultural and pilgrimage tourism assets appear to be concentrated around the central region of Goa, particularly in Bardez, Tiswadi, Ponda, Mormugao and Salcette talukas.
• Different routes / circuits need to be created showcasing tourism assets across these talukas.
— Route / circuit discovering the Goan legacy/ heritage: houses, forts, churches, monuments, blgs.







Immersion in local culture





Pernem
Pernem


Ba










Bicholim

Exploring heritage structures and traditions




Sattari

Sattari

— Route / circuit of the temples
— Village walks – Chandor, Siolim, Pernem and Divar
— City/ Town tours – Panaji, Margao, Mapusa, Old Goa and other

Exploring
Goan churches and temples

Panjim
Tiswadi Mormugao




Ponda






Dharbandora
Dharbandora

major cities/ towns
• Museums, theatres, interpretation centres and event venues located at key tourist spots in the talukas.
• A different strategy is proposed for talukas with presence of isolated assets (Bicholim, Sattari, Dharbandora,Sanguem,

Exploring
Goan villages (Portuguese influence)

Exploring Goan villages (Goan way




Margaon

Salcette
5







Sanguem


Sanguem

Quepem and Canacona). Day excursions / visits can be organized from nearby towns / villages. Or these assets to other themed and/or multi-product routes/ circuits.
• Alternately immersion in the local culture can be facilitated through the medium of community tourism, primarily homestays and visits

of life) & ancient
rock cut caves


Visits, Sight- seeing, Multi- product routes & Community tourism

Quepem



Chaudi

6


Canacona


Hotel strategy – Standards and classifications

High service disparities in accommodation infrastructure
• Serviceability levels among accommodation options within the same star/ DoT hotel categories
• Traveler expectations and actual services offered, especially in bookings made though online media
• Basic traveler requirements not serviced at lower category establishments
Key solutions proposed
• Re-establishing standards for each classification (e.g. A, B, C, D and Heritage) in order to make them relatable to globally recognized classification standards (e.g. European Hotelstars Union, World Hotel Rating, AAA Diamond Ratings or Forbes Travel Guide ratings)
• Ensuring an enforcement mechanism for adherence to required service standards
• Voluntary special labels
Benefits of re-establishing standards and monitoring
• Higher customer satisfaction, promoting repeat visits and positive word of mouth
dissemination in the industry
• Higher value realization for travelers at accommodation establishments
e.g. At Santa Susana- key destination of Costa de Barcelona, especially for European families, the accommodation offer is mainly comprised by quality hotels of 3/ 4 stars (built before 2000). However the opening of two 5-star type hotels in the last three years encouraged surrounding establishments to upgrade and renew their offer.


Accommodation Strategy: Diversification of the tourism experience


















Examples of land requirements according to the zoning in the Regional Plan applied to accommodation




Luxury Eco-Resort (30 Suites
+ 20 Branded Villas)
PROPOSED PROJECT/ PROGRAM
 Total rooms: 50
 Area/ Room Ratio: 180 sqm
 Total Built Up Area: 9,000 sqm

LAND REQUIRED ACCORDING TO ZONING
 VP 1: 15,000 sqm (FAR 60%)
 VP 2: 18,000 sqm (FAR 50%)

4-Star Eco-Lodge (40 Rooms +
20 Cabañas)

PROPOSED PROJECT/ PROGRAM
 Total rooms: 60
 Area/ Room Ratio: 120 sqm
 Total Built Up Area: 7,200 sqm

LAND REQUIRED ACCORDING TO ZONING
 VP 1: 12,000 sqm (FAR 60%)
 VP 2: 14,400 sqm (FAR 50%)

Eco-Cottage & Camps ( 20
Cottages + 40 Tented Camps)

PROPOSED PROJECT/ PROGRAM
 Total rooms: 60
 Area/ Room Ratio: 90 sqm
 Total Built Up Area: 5,400 sqm

LAND REQUIRED ACCORDING TO ZONING
 VP 1: 9,000 sqm (FAR 60%)
 VP 2: 10,800 sqm (FAR 50%)






























2.

Core tourism Infrastructure Tourism programs
Investment and funding analysis
Phasing
Tourism circuits


27 programs have been defined to develop the Master plan

































Understanding the programs’ structure








Draft for discussion

Coastal Tourism Programs


Flagship programs Quick Wins





Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches
Across Goan beaches. Pilot Projects – N. Goa: Calangute, Candolim, Baga, Arambol.
S. Goa: Colva, Palolem
Fishermen Market and F&B Court
Brittona, Chapora Bay, Siridao and Mobor


High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort
At a suitable location in Arambol, Vagator or Anjuna; and Cavelossim or Palolem


Eco-beach (Resort)
Pure Eco-beach: Galgibag, Morjim turtle stretch/ bird watching and Talpona. Resort: Agonda, Patnem, Palolem (part), Morjim, Mandrem and Querim


Marinas
Nauxi, Chicalim and Britonna; Further south e.g.: Assolna



Regeneration/ Upgrading of beaches


Product: Coastal tourism Commercial • Beaches along the coast of Goa will
Flagship program Quick wins strategy provide its resident population, the tourism
industry and tourists with basic services that cater for their needs and requirements.
Implementation • Launch either Calangute Beach to the north strategy or Colva beach in the south as pilot phase to showcase results and create awareness.
The program will implement good practice in these processes and replicate the experience in other beaches.


Key issues to be addressed
• Infrastructure improvements envisaged – beach access, cleaning, maintenance, water, electricity, sewerage, parking
• Regulation, relocation from the beach and upgrade of shacks/ and retail shops.
• Quality labels should be implemented to guarantee a best in class experience to visitors, encouraging repeat visits.
• Misbehaviour from tourists and retail owners: lack of cleanliness at all beaches, and also, high levels of alcohol and drug abuse on certain beaches
 
Timeframe: Short term
Concept and objectives • Coastal tourism is “THE” tourism product Goa is famed for; however, efforts need to be taken to upgrade/ organize the existing product and enhance the tourist experience in an increasingly competitive global coastal tourism scenario. Goa needs to improve its basic infrastructures, particularly in the most developed coastal areas to support the sustainable development of tourism growth.
• It is envisaged that the overall quality of the existing infrastructure is improved to bring it on par with best in class products, with special emphasis laid on innovation, quality, safety and security.
Accommodation needs • The inclusion of high-end music venues or high-end lifestyle beach clubs combined with luxury lifestyle resorts (Ushuaia and Nikki Beach concepts respectively) can raise the quality level in the area and bring other synergies
Market strategy • Tourists (domestic and foreign) and residents
• Day and overnight visitors (including day cruise visitors)



Raising the quality, safety and sanitation level of the most popular beaches







































Summary of strategy
Regeneration/ Up gradation of beaches
Pedestrian and non-motorized access Vehicular access & parking areas Shacks Beach facilities & equipment
 Promenade along the beach front
 Comfortable, safe and efficient pedestrian network with wide sidewalks to access the beach promenade
 Encourage biking by providing bike paths
 Proper access to the beach
 Provision of large open public spaces along the promenade. These will work as “Gathering Places” facilitating social contact and communication, including cultural and commercial activities
 Barrier free access for specially abled persons  The road running parallel to the promenade (sea front) is blocked off from all traffic
 Parking closest to the beach should be the most expensive
 More parking options are available in the surroundings
 Free shuttle bus services available connecting parking to the beach  Shacks set up on the edge of the beach under specific standards and granted as a special license as per the shack policy
 Shacks set up at intervals from each other as specified in the shack policy
 Main concentration of eateries should not be directly on the beach, but behind the road running parallel to the promenade and along the streets converging on the beach subject to land availability
 Give quality labels to best shacks and special Goan cuisine label for those who would like to apply and meet standards  Sitting areas
 Showers
 Changing rooms
 Playgrounds for kids
 Parking for bicycles
 Signage illustrating advanced quality and environmental beach management
 Demarcation of swimming, water sports and no swim zones along the beach
 First aid facilities
Transversal strategies
 Safety: increasing the number of local policemen and building a network video surveillance system with network cameras
 Solid waste management: developing a proper network of collection and disposal of solid waste
 The ultimate goal of the Regeneration/ Up gradation of beaches program is to impact on human behaviour through the built environment. It is expected that the improvement on the overall state of beaches will help reducing misbehaviour from tourists and retail owners, lack of cleanliness, noise, and the high levels of alcohol and drug abuse.


Regeneration/ Up gradation of beaches – example of the different sections could be found on beaches depending on their degree of urbanization

Draft for discuss1ion
Regeneration/ Up gradation of beaches – conceptual example of zones













C
A
B



Shacks





Beach facilities & equipment



Urbanized beaches – assumptions applied in estimating the construction costs for the Program


Non-urbanized (natural) beaches – assumptions applied in estimating the construction costs for the Program


Cost concept 1 kilometre of Promenade along non-urbanized (natural) beaches
Total cost INR 2.78 cr
Facilities • Promenade (light and eco- friendly structure equipped with sitting areas, waste-paper bins and walking paths to access the beach)
• In order to protect marine life and biodiversity, some natural beaches should not be equipped with lighting systems and illumination during the night
• Parking (100 parking lots)
• Beach facilities (solid waste management, showers, toilets, information panels and signage illustrating advanced quality and environmental beach management)



Benchmark and character images








“Best Practices”

• Playa de Palma
• Blue Flag voluntary label (www.blueflag.org)
• Nautical Stations in Spain (www.estacionesnauticas.info)
• Bali: Focus on cleanliness, access and public utilities. To control tourist flow, wall has been developed parallel to main beaches with convenient entry points. Roads are lined with pedestrian walkways which offer a view of the beach. To decongest the traffic near beaches, many roads have a one way access.
• Salou and Cambrils Municipalities, Spain- Since the 19th century, Salou has been a leading tourist destination in Europe, its slogan is “Salou Europe’s beach”. Quality, excellence and respect for the environment are the standards used when working on the Salou coast. All of the municipality’s beaches have been awarded ISO I400I Environmental Certification. Salou and Cambrils are working together with two more neighbouring municipalities in order to achieve its main goal today: reduction in seasonality. With a large leisure offering (which includes Port Aventura World) they have become a reference of family and sports tourist destinations.









Fishermen market and F&B court

Key issues to be addressed
• Identification of at least 2 fishermen ports / markets where the product could be developed: at least one in the South and one in the North of Goa
• Ensure participation of local stakeholders: fishermen, fish market sales shops and food & beverage entrepreneurs, which could be already established ones, willing to replicate their experience in a new location.
• Ensure that Goan cuisine is featured in the product and that good quality is provided in terms of food products, food stands and culinary preparation, cleanliness and maintenance

Draft for discuss2ion
Goa’s number one source of premium fresh seafood and local cuisine

Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Britona, Chapora Bay, Siridao and Mobor/ Assolna Fishermen port and market (adjacent or nearby); Food & beverage court space (at least 1,000 sq.m.)
Description and tasks
• Identification of the fishing port/ village for carrying out of the pilot test
• Location: The final location has to be well thought out after a thorough study of the terrain, avoiding any damage to existing local and fishing activities.
• Identification and selection of gastronomic offering, which needs to be aligned with the programme to promote the traditional cuisine of Goa throughout the state.
• Make agreements with all interested stakeholders and agree on space & program
• Implementation e.g. Turisme Pesquer activity is a more relaxing alternative to an active fishing tour. It involves departing from the port of Cambrils in a pleasure boat, and sailing to where the fishermen work and cast their trawl nets. From there, they explain the different kinds of fishing tackle and the treasures of the Mediterranean Sea. Then the traveler is taken to a seaside restaurant to enjoy the delights of Cambrils' seafood restaurants, and dishes such as the "ranxo mariner" (sailor's fare)
• Ensure that minimum space is available and design the concept with 2 main options:
• Popular and informal Food Court: one shared public dining room with F&B stands around
• Cluster of specialised fish and shellfish restaurants and/ or shacks with different
sizes and culinary levels
• Certification and quality labels



Benchmark and character images








High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort


Market strategy • Aimed at domestic and international tourists and visitors
Implementation strategy • The programme will be put into practice in one of the most developed and popular beaches in Goa's northern area, currently dominated by mass tourism. Once the beach is selected, the most appropriate location must be found.
• It is a single project, not to be duplicated
in different locations/ beaches.

Key issues to be addressed
• Selection of the most suitable beach to locate the project. It is expected that this kind of products will increase quality levels in adjacent areas. Other resorts/ events locations, either existing or future, will try to improve their standards to provide the same quality level.
• Once the beach is selected, the precise location must be studied in detail as well as the size of the site needed
• Take into account conditions of access (both pedestrian and vehicular) and the parking supply
• Take into account the conditions of cleanliness, lighting and
security in the vicinity of the club
• Selection of operator / brand

Envisioned to be one of the most exclusive and biggest clubs in India

Draft for discuss3ion







Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
At a suitable location in Baga,
Calangute or Candolim 3 to 4 Ha



Benchmark and character images










High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort



• Selection of the most suitable beach to locate the project. It is expected that this kind of product will help to increase the competitiveness of the destination. Other existing or future resorts/ beach clubs will try to improve their standards to provide the same quality level.
• Most suitable location and site necessary for the development.
• Improve access conditions (both pedestrian and vehicular) and the
parking supply.
• Improve the conditions of cleanliness, lighting and security in the vicinity of the beach club.
• Selection of operator / brand

Draft for discuss4ion
Featuring a blend of music, art and fashion with day and night atmosphere






Benchmark and character images









Eco-beach resort


Market strategy • Domestic and foreign tourists
Implementation strategy • Launch either Galgibag beach or Talpona beach to the south as a pilot project to showcase results and create awareness. The program will implement good practices in this process and stakeholders will be able to replicate the experience in other beaches.

Key issues to be addressed
• There are some beaches that need to be protected from any kind of construction. These zones should be given the status and format of “Marine Nature & Life Parks”
• Eco-beach resorts should include an environmental and social programme in their development
• Low density branded resorts for the high-end market should be promoted (brands such as Banyan Tree, Six Senses, The Oberoi, Como Hotels, etc.)
• Develop eco-tourism standards, which could be totally or mainly inspired in already existing green eco-label
• Green certifications and quality labels for activities/ experiences

Draft for discuss5ion
Built in harmony with nature and hence with minor impact on environment


Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Pure Eco-beach: Galgibag, Morjim turtle stretch and Talpona. Eco-beach resort: Agonda, Patnem, Palolem (part), Morjim, Mandrem and Querim
1.5 to 3 Ha



Benchmark and character images







Eco-beach Resort
What is an Eco-Resort exactly? Some examples of activities offered
 Low density developments (small sized tourist accommodation structure)
 Often located in special interest and preserved / protected areas (they contribute to the protection of the fragile neighbouring zones)
 Built in harmony with nature and hence with minor impact on environment
 Involves the local communities and allows them to generate benefits
 Financially sustainable
 Offers tourists the opportunity for an interactive experience and proves to be suitable for a spiritual communion between nature and culture
 Eco-Resorts are planned, designed, built and exploited in accordance with responsible environmental and social principles  Nature-based activities
 Walking, cycling, horseback and camel rides
 Exploring the local fauna, flora, bird and insect life around
 Agro-tourism
 Some establishments include organic gardens to supply their restaurants and tourists can even participate in cooking sessions
 Protection and Interpretation Centres
 Learning-by-doing activities (Edutainment) with local communities
 Rural and community activities based on traditional and local products
 Relaxation and recovery activities such as Spa treatments & massages, meditation, yoga
 Incentives, team-building activities
 Water and energy consumption: steps to reduce its carbon footprint must be taken to avoid impacts on the surroundings
 Solid waste management: developing a proper network of collection and disposal of solid waste.



Illustrative conceptual example

As mentioned before, Eco-beach resorts will be located in special interest and/or preserved/ protected areas as they contribute to the protection of the fragile neighbouring zones. The use and management of the surrounding areas might be done under the ‘Eco Nature Park’ approach.

Eco Nature Park


The Eco Nature Park is open to the guests and offers the possibility to discover the local fauna and flora. The park has a scientific and educational purpose, offering to biologists and volunteers an area of study of this eco-system and offering to the public an entertaining way to discover the fauna and flora of the eco-system.
Visitors are able to walk through the park on wood board trails and marked trails. These trails are punctuated by information board that describe the ecosystem of the park.
Trekking, bird watching, diving and other nature activities can be organized.






















BRANDED VILLAS HOTEL



Marinas


Implementati on strategy • At least one marina needs to be developed so as to raise the quality and the standards
• The first marina development is envisioned for the Chapora bay as it is strategically the destination promoted for the yachters’ market. Further marina development along the coast is envisioned to be connected through a network of services and standards
Key issues to be addressed

• Location: Final location has to be well thought out after a thorough study of the terrain and avoid trampling on existing local and fishing activities.
• Development Program: determine the optimum size and the list of components to be included as part of the development
• The development of the marina should be best left to the private industry and stakeholders (Government to be the licensing authority and a catalyst).
• Include an assessment of the general opinion of the initiative and its impact in the media.

Understood as an anchor of a mixed-use development which includes accommodation, retail, F&B and entertainment premises




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Nauxi Bay, Chicalim and Britona -



Benchmark and character images





















Coastal Programs – Initial investment concepts

Estimations refer to the costs of building one unit/ facility

Programs cost concept Unit of Cost per Number of Total Cost measure unit (INR) units (INR Cr.) Financial Model
Public Private
1.- Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches Urbanized beaches Linear metre 55,667.3 1,000 5.57 100%
Non-urbanized (natural) beaches Linear metre 27,833.7 1,000 2.78 100%
2.- Fishermen Market and F&B Court Fishermen Market Use existing fishermen market
F&B court (core and shell) sq. m. 17,200 1,000 sq. m. 1.72 100%
3.- High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort
Resort + Venue keys 4,128,600 300 keys 123.86 100%
4.- High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort
Resort + Beach Club keys 3,440,500 250 keys 86 100%
5.- Eco-beach (Resort) Resort keys 2,752,400 55 keys 15.14 100%
Discovery Eco Centre Units 4,816,700 1 unit 0.5 100%

6.- Marina* Berths (including site
Berths 2,408,350 50 12.04
preparation)
100%
Mixed-use development sq. m. 47,135 15,000 Sq. m. 70.7



These costs do not include the cost of land
(*) Investment is subject to specific project conditions and may vary largely depending on location, site preparation, marina construction works and development program

Coastal Programs – Estimated initial investment (phased over the next 10 years)


Coastal Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027

1.- Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches 8 km of urbanized beaches + 22 km of natural beaches
105.8
35.3
35.3
35.3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2.- Fishermen Market and F&B Court
3 F&B Courts
5.2
1.7
1.7
1.7
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3.- High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
123.9
0.0
-
61.9
61.9
-
-
-
-
-
-
4.- High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
86.0
0.0
-
43.0
43.0
-
-
-
-
-
-
5.- Eco-beach (Resort) 3 Resorts 46.9 0.0 - 15.6 15.6 15.6 - - - - -
6.- Marina 1 Marina 82.7 0.0 - 27.6 27.6 27.6 - -
-
-
-
Total Coastal Programs Budget
450.4
37.0
37.0
185.1
148.1
43.2
-
-
-
-
-
(%) 100% 8.21% 8.21% 41.10% 32.89% 9.59% - - - - -

Coastal Programs – Reinvestment (1.5% of estimated initial investment)


Coastal Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027

1.- Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches 8 km of urbanized beaches + 22 km of natural beaches
12.7
-
0.5
1.1
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
2.- Fishermen Market and F&B Court
3 F&B Courts
0.6 -
0.0
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
3.- High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
11.1
-
-
-
-
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
4.- High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
7.7
-
-
-
-
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
5.- Eco-beach (Resort) 3 Resorts 4.2 - - - 0.2 0.5 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7
6.- Marina 1 Marina 6.2 - - - - - 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2
Total Coastal Programs Budget
42.6
0.0
0.6
1.1
1.9
5.3
6.8
6.8
6.8
6.8
6.8
(%) 100% - 1.30% 2.60% 4.45% 12.39% 15.85% 15.85% 15.85% 15.85% 15.85%

Coastal Programs – Total estimated initial investment + Reinvestment


Coastal Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027

1.- Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches 8 km of urbanized beaches + 22 km of natural beaches
118.5
35.3
35.8
36.3
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
1.6
2.- Fishermen Market and F&B Court
3 F&B Courts
5.8
1.7
1.7
1.8
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
3.- High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
135.0
-
-
61.9
61.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.9
4.- High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
93.8
-
-
43.0
43.0
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
5.- Eco-beach (Resort) 3 Resorts 51.1 - - 15.6 15.9 16.1 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7
6.- Marina 1 Marina 88.9 - - 27.6 27.6 27.6 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2 1.2
Total Coastal Programs Budget
493.0
37.0
37.5
186.2
150.0
48.5
6.8
6.8
6.8
6.8
6.8
(%) 100% 7.50% 7.61% 37.77% 30.43% 9.83% 1.37% 1.37% 1.37% 1.37% 1.37%

Coastal Programs – Distribution of total estimated initial investment + Reinvestment


Coastal Budget
Total Distribution by Program

Coastal Budget Public Vs. Private




Marina, 18.0%




Eco-beach (Resort), 10.4%


High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort, 19.0%

Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches, 24.0%


Fishermen Market and F&B Court, 1.2%


High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort, 27.4%

















Private, 74.8%



Public, 25.2%




Total expected cost
(over the next 10 years)
INR 493 Cr.

Coastal Programs – Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures (2% of estimated initial investment)



Coastal Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027

1.- Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches 8 km of urbanized beaches + 22 km of natural beaches
16.9 -
0.7
1.4
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.- Fishermen Market and F&B Court
3 F&B Courts
0.8
-
0.0
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
3.- High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
Not Estimated
4.- High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort
1 Resort
Not Estimated
5.- Eco-beach (Resort) 3 Resorts 0.2 - - - 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
6.- Marina 1 Marina Not Estimated
Total Coastal Programs Budget
17.9
0.0
0.7
1.5
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
2.2
(%) - 4.13% 8.25% 12.43% 12.49% 12.54% 12.54% 12.54% 12.54% 12.54%
100%


Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures refers to maintenance, cleanliness and security of the facility Private annual recurrent expenses related with Facility Management are not estimated
(*) Refers to the Discovery Eco Centres only



Coastal Programs – Financing Options

Coastal Program Initiatives
Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches Fishermen Market and F&B Court High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort Eco-beach (Resort) Marina
 The State government predominantly would fund this initiative with limited help from private players which could include shack owners and hotels

 The financing could also be done through a BOT model with private hotels, with infrastructure costs borne by the State government  Financing options would include PPP with major F&B player entering into contract with the State government  Financing through private participation with major global hotel chains funding the initiative under complete ownership or with partnerships with major international lifestyle brands  Financing through private participation with major global hotel chains funding the initiative under complete ownership or with partnerships with major international lifestyle brands  Central or state government/ Multilateral agency funding with eco- conservation for development of area

 An alternative financing scheme would be partnerships with CSR department of multinational firms and the State government to foster eco-tourism

 Private participation in financing of individual projects  Predominantly financing through private participation with major tourism players

Coastal Tourism Programs – Summary


Program Flagship program ‘Quick win’ Short term Medium term Long term Public Private Public Private
1- Regeneration/ Up gradation of Beaches



Lead
Support
Lead Service contract
2- Fishermen Market and F&B Court    PPP Support Lead
3- High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort


Support
Lead
Support
Lead
4- High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort

Support
Lead
Support
Lead
5- Eco-beach (Resort)  Support Lead Support Lead
6- Marinas  Support Lead Support Lead








Short term: within 3 years Medium term: 3 - 5 years Long term: 5 years/ above









Monuments
Key Pilot projects: Old Goa Churches, Mary Immaculate Church, Mangueshi &
Shantadurga Temples, Tambdi Surla, Pansaimol rock carvings, Kurdi templ
Villages (arrive and walk)
Siolim, Sangolda, Divar, Chorao, Pomburpa, Aldona, Chandor, Gaondongri, Rivona,
Naroa


The Goa Multimedia Experience
Old Goa Church Complex/ environs or Kala Academy
Handicrafts
Sale of products via GHRSSIDC (Aparant) in dense tourist locations & online channels



Forts



Key issues to be addressed

• Potential conflicts due to the incompatibility of uses in heritage buildings
• Carrying capacity
• Possible sources of financing
• Stakeholder’s enrolment (tours operators, travel agencies, tour guides, press, local tourism development units, rural exploitations, etc.) in order to create the tourism product


Providing nice visitor journey experience and enhance with complementary such as F&B, retail and events

Potential locations
Forts Reis Magos, Tiracol, Chapora, Aguada and Cabo de Rama

Facilities and land requirements

N/A

Tiracol




Chapora


Pernem
Pernem


Bardez

Mapusa







Bicholim

Bicholim Sattari


Karnataka

Description and tasks
• Aspects to be addressed to improve facilities: transport and infrastructure to access the premises, including specially abled access facilitation, signage, safety, surveillance cameras, first aid kits, public amenities like toilets and cloak rooms, interpretation tools such as panels and information in the premises, use of new


Aguada

Reis Magos






Vasco da Gama



Panaji
Tiswadi

North Goa


Ponda

Sattari

technologies, access to Internet, tourist mobile apps
• Aspects to be addressed to add new facilities: museum/ visitor centre / interpretation centre, restaurant or cafeteria, souvenir shop, toilets, parking area, boutique hotel accommodation, sufficient illumination

Mormugao






Arabian Sea

Ponda


Margao
Salcette









Quepem

Dharbandora
Dharbandora



Sanguem
Sanguem

• Funding can be procured through national/ regional funds programmes, along with innovative financing methods like corporate CSR
• Aspects related with operational guidelines: develop code of conduct for visitors, tourists, employees and residents, providing guidelines, develop maintenance plans and schedules for cleanliness and safety in order to enhance preservation, tour guide regulations, collaborate with respective Govt. depts, among others



Cabo de Rama

South Goa
Quepem

Chaudi
Canacona

• Actions linked to the holding of events: programming a schedule of cultural events (weekly / monthly) on the fort premises, scheduling of talks or conferences with academics or historians
• Actions associated to the enhancement of the forts network (if applicable): recovery and development of old communication routes between forts for tourism purposes, improve accessibility, improve basic tourist infrastructures associated to the route, provide bus services, develop points of interest



Benchmark and character images




Draft for discuss2ion
Monuments (Temples, Churches, Museums & other Archaeological sites)


Commercial
strategy • Beaches along the coast of Goa will provide its resident population, the tourism industry and tourists with basic services that cater for their needs and requirements.
Implementati on strategy • Launch Old Goa Church Complex as pilot project to showcase results and create awareness.
• The program will implement good practices in these processes and replicate the experience in other assets.

Key issues to be addressed

• Potential conflicts due to the incompatibility of uses in heritage buildings
• Carrying capacity
• Possible sources of financing
• Stakeholder’s enrolment (tours operators, travel agencies, tour guides, press, local tourism development units, rural exploitations, etc.) in order to create the tourism product

Key area for improvement: Maintenance and development of assets and supporting infrastructure




Benchmark and character images





Spain – as many other countries in Europe and America – has several examples of mining sites that have been converted into tourist attractions where tourists and visitors are able to see and experience the present or historic heritage extraction processes

• The Mining and Industry Museum of Asturias (MUMI), founded by the Principado de Asturias and Caja de Asturias, pays tribute to coal mining, an activity that has determined the social and industrial situation of Asturias for two centuries.
• Throughout the different sections of the Mining and Industry Museum of Asturias, visitors can explore various old machines that were used in European mining before the steam and industrial revolution occurred, as well as the explosives used to extract the minerals
• Visitors can also experience what it’s like to be in a mine and learn about the different systems used to obtain coal by using the ‘cage’ (the miners lift) which will take them down to the mine
• A walk around the museum lets tourists understand various scientific instruments used in the scientific and industrial development of the society, mining hospitals, electrical work, minerals and fossils

• 2 hours 30 minutes

Source: http://www.mumi.es/media/Default%20Files/MUMI/MUMIEN/index.html




• The permanent exhibition is divided into 2 spaces: coal, its mining, the importance of coal infrastructures, transport and its previous screening before use, both as home and industrial fuel and as primary source to produce electricity.
• The new exhibition, “The Spectacle of the Mine”, foster the understanding of the two types of mining developments in use nowadays: underground and opencast mining.
• The museography as it is planned aims at taking the visitor into a history narrated from the future. From here visitors will rediscover the world of mines through projections, holograms and innovative image and sound effects.
• At the end the workers' housing can be seen. The visit is completed by the viewing of an audio-visual based on the Alt Berguedà mining area and the guided visit into the inside of the mine where working conditions through time are to be analysed.

• 1 hour 30 minutes

Source: http://www.mmcercs.cat/en/museum



Villages (arrive and walk around)


Key issues to be addressed

• Draft legislation to architecturally regulate façades &
finishing of buildings
• Specific architectural and colour identity (as in every famous tourist destination) – there is need to control and restrict the design and colours of existing and new buildings and houses.
• Possible sources of financing
• Goa has already had a successful experience (the Fontainhas case) in the restoration of heritage buildings and this could be studied and included as a ‘best practice’.
• Quality labels should be implemented to guarantee a best in class experience to visitors, thus encouraging repeat visits.



Highlighting authentic features while providing multi-experience

Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Siolim, Sangolda, Divar, Chorao, Pomburpa, Aldona, Chandor, Gaondongrim, Rivona
N/A



Benchmark and character images








Old Goan houses


Implementati on strategy • Launch of a pilot test with a relatively small number of properties, preferably those which are in best condition at present. Provide assistance plans for restoration and maintenance and carry out promotion by the inclusion of the structures in an itinerary (providing GPS location mapping).

Key issues to be addressed

• Potential conflicts due to the incompatibility of uses in heritage buildings
• Possible sources of financing
• Goa has already had a successful experience (the Fontainhas case) in the restoration of heritage buildings and this could be studied and included as a ‘best practice’
• Draft legislation for the protection of this type of asset
• Quality labels should be implemented to guarantee a best in class experience to visitors, thus encouraging repeat visits.
• Public Private Partnerships


Designed to stir the imagination and allow history lovers to stay in some of the most historic buildings




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Panaji-Fontainhas, Aldona, Siolim, Colvale, Chandor, Curtorim, Raia, Sanguem
N/A

Description and tasks
• Establish a list including both Portuguese and Hindu influence
• Identify those well kept and list for initial promotion providing GPS location and mapping
• Provide restoration and maintenance schemes
• Encourage innovative financing methods, e.g. The Vallès Oriental county comprises 39 municipalities and work on three main lines: communication and promotion, quality and training, and support to the municipalities and the tourism enterprises. Little villages received funds for tourism projects from the European Commission through the counties.
• Encourage heritage walks
• Include them in themed circuits and encourage complementary use for shops, arts, Food & Beverage; accommodation (homestays and Bed & Breakfast)



Benchmark and character images





Culinary


Implementati on strategy • Launch of a pilot project that includes the creation of a training centre for the teaching and learning of the cooking methods and techniques for typical dishes of Goa cuisine.
• Additionally, it should include the creation of a space where visitors can get to know and can try local products and dishes. This initiative could be associated with the “Fisherman Market and F&B Court” program (see Coastal programs)
Key issues to be addressed
• Preparation of a list, agreed on by a panel of experts, of the dishes – as well as their preparation – that make up the cuisine of Goa
• Showcasing of these Goan dishes and F&B products throughout the Goa State.
• Effective promotion and recognition of this cuisine to and by tourists, visitors and local residents

Draft for discuss5ion
Goan food and drinks: reviving traditional receipts paired with modern creation






Beach Shacks

Riverside Promenade
Pernem
Pernem


Bardez










Bicholim

Culinary tourism in homestays, house visits and spice villages/ farms


Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Across Goa N/A
Description and tasks
• Identify, define and revive authentic Goan food and drinks – experts panel –

Restaurants

Mapusa

Bicholim Sattari

popular and gastronomic cuisine

e.g. Spice Goa Riverside Promenade
Agro farms
e.g. Yogi Farms

Spice Farms e.g. Sahakari spice farm


Panjim
Tiswadi

Vasco da Gama
Mormugao

North Goa


Ponda

Ponda



Margaon
Salcette

Sattari





Dharbandora
Dharbandora




Sanguem

• Identify and promote shacks and restaurants that offer authentic Goan cuisine
through special label
• Culinary approach should not be focused only on traditional food but also on creativity process for modern Goan cuisine, using local food & beverage products and different influences
• Goan cuisine could be a blend of popular food paired with gastronomic approach
• Enhance special culinary events on a weekly, monthly and yearly basis
• Goa Food and Cultural Festival should focus more on Goan products and cuisine,


Farmers markets

Quepem

South Goa

Quepem

Chaudi
Canacona

Sanguem

though not necessarily exclusively
• Spice farms could also paly a role and provide culinary experiences with a taste of Goan food using different kind of spices.
• Marketing and distribution of local produce like Feni and Wine needs scaling up
• Development of cashew trails, wine circuits and cooking lessons to promote
culinary tastes of goa
• Enhance food markets paired with specialized/ themed food courts



Benchmark and character images






Cultural events



Key issues to be addressed

• Reinforce existing events
• Create a variety of events appealing for different types of public
• Ensure that some events take place in the hinterlands
• Ensure funding for their preparation and celebration
• Ensure long term sustainability of successful events

Draft for discuss6ion
Featuring a blend of music, art and fashion with day and night atmosphere




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Old Goa, Panaji-Fontainhas, Adil Shah Palace, Church square and different locations on the coast and more importantly in the hinterlands

N/A



Benchmark and character images




The Goa Multimedia Experience


Implementati on strategy • A place among the potential options is selected and the first version of the show is launched. It is then updated as the new product and experience offering is developed.
• It is a single project, not to be duplicated in different locations/ beaches.


Key issues to be addressed

• Selection of the most suitable place to locate the project
• Take into account conditions of access (both pedestrian and vehicles) and the parking supply

Accommodati on needs • Not linked to a specific accommodation offering

Market
strategy • Tourists (domestic and foreign) and resident population
• Day and overnight visitors (including day cruise visitors)
Commercial strategy • The Goa Multimedia Experience show will allow visitors to appreciate the idiosyncrasy of the places and the peoples of the state. It will be possible to learn the history behind many of Goa's towns, monuments and traditions.



A showcase of all the experiences available to tourists visiting Goa




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Old Goa Church Complex/ environs
or Kala Academy 0.5 to 1 Ha in case of building a new
facility



Benchmark and character images
















Handicrafts



Key issues to be addressed

• Promotion of authentic Goa handcrafts, as well as their traditional production techniques and methods
• Involvement of the local communities in the programme
• Goa has its Goa Chitra Ethnographic Museum, which
could be a reference for “best practices”



Creation of a real showcase of Goan hand-made items






Benchmark and character images
















Culture & Heritage Programs – Initial investment concepts

Estimations refer to the costs of building one unit/ facility

Programs cost concept Unit of Cost per Number of Total Cost measure unit (INR) units (INR Cr.) Financial Model
Public Private
1.- Forts Adaptation for tourism use + 20,643,000 2.4 100% basic facilities: Welcome centre,
ticketing, souvenir shop, F&B Lump sum N/A
outlet, toilets, parking, 34,400,000 3.44 100% signposting within premises, etc.

2.- Monuments
3.- Villages (arrive and walk) Adaptation for tourism use Lump sum 55,048,000 N/A 5.5 100%
4.- Old Goan Houses Restoration and maintenance Lump sum 1,032,150 N/A 0.1 50% 50%
5.- Culinary Goan Culinary World Centre* sq. m. 47,135 2,000 sq. m. 9.43 100%
6.- Cultural Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
7.- The Goa Multimedia Experience Theatre facility + Production of
Lump sum 206,430,000 N/A 20.6 100%
multimedia film
8.- Handicrafts Goan Handicraft World Centre sq. m. 47,135 2,000 sq. m. 9.43
100%
Network of specialized shops** shop 1,720,250 5 0.86





These costs do not include the cost of land
(*) Similar to the Fishermen Market and F&B Court, this is a place for showcasing, learning, tasting and selling of Food & Beverage products (**) At least 5 shops located in busy places such as the airport, city centre, main train stations, shopping streets, etc.

Culture & Heritage Programs – Estimated initial investment (phased over the next 10 years)



C&H Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Forts 6 Forts 14.5 4.8 4.8 4.8 - - - - - - -
2.- Monuments 7 Sites/
Monuments 24.1 8.0 8.0 8.0 - - - - - - -
3.- Villages (arrive and
walk)
7 Villages
38.5
12.8
12.8
12.8
-
-
-
-
-
4.- Old Goan Houses 50 Heritage houses 5.2 1.7 1.7 1.7 - - - - - - -
5.- Culinary 2 Goan Culinary
World Centres 18.9 - 9.4 9.4 - - - - - - -
6.- Cultural Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
7.- The Goa Multimedia Experience
1 Facility
20.6
-
-
10.3
10.3
-
-
-
-
-
-
8.- Handicrafts 1 Goan Handicraft
World 9.4 - - 4.7 4.7 - - - - - -
Total C&H Programs Budget
131
15
24
52
28
13
-
-
-
-
-
(%) 100% 11.11% 18.29% 39.55% 21.26% 9.79% - - - - -

Culture & Heritage Programs – Reinvestment (1.5% of estimated initial investment)


C&H Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Forts 6 Forts 1.7 - 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
2.- Monuments 7 Sites/
Monuments 2.9 - 0.1 0.2 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4
3.- Villages (arrive and walk)
7 Villages
3.5
-
-
-
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
4.- Old Goan Houses 50 Heritage houses 0.6 - 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
5.- Culinary 2 Goan Culinary
World Centres 2.0 - - - 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
6.- Cultural Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
7.- The Goa Multimedia Experience
1 Facility
1.9
-
-
-
-
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
8.- Handicrafts 1 Goan Handicraft
World 0.8 - - - - 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
Total C&H Programs Budget
13.4
-
0.2
0.4
1.1
1.8
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
(%) 100% - 1.63% 3.26% 8.44% 13.25% 14.68% 14.68% 14.68% 14.68% 14.68%



C&H Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Forts 6 Forts
16.2
4.8
4.9
5.0
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
2.- Monuments 7 Sites/
Monuments
27.0
8.0
8.1
8.3
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
3.- Villages (arrive and walk)
7 Villages
42.0
-
-
12.8
13.0
13.2
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
4.- Old Goan Houses 50 Heritage houses
5.8
1.7
1.7
1.8
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
5.- Culinary 2 Goan Culinary
World Centres
20.8
-
9.4
9.4
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
6.- Cultural Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
7.- The Goa Multimedia Experience
1 Facility

22.5

-

-

10.3

10.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.3
8.- Handicrafts 1 Goan Handicraft
World
10.3
-
-
4.7
4.7
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
Total C&H Programs Budget
144.5
14.6
24.2
52.3
29.0
14.6
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
(%) 100% 10.08% 16.75% 36.19% 20.07% 10.11% 1.36% 1.36% 1.36% 1.36% 1.36%



Culture & Heritage Budget Total Distribution by Program
Handicrafts,

Culture & Heritage Budget Public Vs. Private

Private, 2.0%

The Goa Multimedia Experience, 15.4%

7.0%

Forts, 11.2%


Monuments, 18.7%



Culinary, 14.5%




Old Goan Houses, 4.0%


Villages, 29.1%



Public, 98.0%




Total expected cost
(over the next 10 years)
INR 144.5 Cr.

Culture & Heritage Programs – Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures (2% of estimated initial investment)


C&H Programs Yearly Number of Total (INR 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027
Budget projects Cr.)
1.- Forts 6 Forts 2.3 - 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
2.- Monuments 7 Sites/
Monuments 3.9 - 0.2 0.3 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5
3.- Villages (arrive and walk)
7 Villages
4.6
-
-
-
0.3
0.5
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
4.- Old Goan Houses N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A


5.- Culinary 2 Goan Culinary World Centres + 1 Big Annual
Culinary Event

6.1

0.3

0.3

0.3

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7

0.7
6.- Cultural Events Lump Sum 3.4 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
7.- The Goa Multimedia Experience
1 Facility
2.5
-
-
-
-
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
8.- Handicrafts 1 Goan Handicraft
World + 5 shops 6.3 - - - - 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0
Total C&H Programs Budget
29.1
0.7
0.9
1.2
2.1
3.8
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
(%) 100% 2.37% 3.25% 4.13% 7.20% 13.11% 13.99% 13.99% 13.99% 13.99% 13.99%

Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures refers to maintenance, cleanliness and security of the facility Private annual recurrent expenses related with Facility Management are not estimated

Culture & Heritage Programs – Financing Options
Culture & Heritage Program Initiatives

Forts and monuments Villages (arrive and walk) and old Goan houses Culinary Cultural Events Goa Multimedia Experience
Handicrafts
 The proposed financing method would be through Central government and state government schemes

 Funding opportunities can also be explored through promotion support and joint ventures with private brands  Private participation in financing

 Financing could be explored through support from CSR initiatives of multinational corporations along with government schemes for development of area

 Funding support can also be explored through hotel chains and multilateral organisations for developing model tourist experience villages  Private participation in financing

 Funding would be potentially obtained through investments from restaurants and global / national food chains

 State government joint venture with local food chains to develop the unique Goan food destination  Government funding with support from private parties depending on nature of event  Investments through private parties with support from State government


 Funding through experience lifestyle chains to develop the Goan cultural multimedia experience in the selected locations  State and Central government funding support through SME funding schemes


 State joint ventures with leading e- commerce ventures to provide funds and provide online commerce infrastructure support

Culture & Heritage Programs – Summary



Program Flagship program ‘Quick win’ Short term Medium term Long term Public Private Public Private

1.- Forts



Lead
-
Lead Service contract

2.- Monuments



Lead
-
Lead Service contract
3.- Villages (arrive and walk)   PPP Support Lead
4.- Old Goan Houses   PPP Support Lead
5.- Culinary   Support Lead Support Lead
6.- Cultural Events   PPP PPP

7.- The Goa Multimedia Experience


Lead
-
- Service
contract
8.- Handicrafts  PPP Support Lead



Short term: within 3 years Medium term: 3 - 5 years Long term: 5 years/ above








Discovery River Cruises (EF)
Rivers Mandovi, Zuari, Sal and Chapora; Cumbarjua Canal



Agro tourism (spice farms/ homestays and agro farms)
In the areas of Molem, Ponda outskirts, Netravali and Quepem



Nature Sanctuaries (EF)
Bondla, Bhagvan Mahaveer, Netravali, Cotigao, Molem National Park and Dr. Salim Ali
Bird Sanctuary
‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres
Divar; Also mainly around the hinterland under certified eco-friendly accommodation


Nature Clusters (EF)
4 main clusters: one in each of the hinterland talukas: Satari, Dharbandora,
Sanguem and Canacon

Adventure & Sports Tourism
Bogmalo – Grande Island and its environs; Majorda for water based sports; Dudhsagar Base Camp and Vagueri hills Base Camp



Discovery river cruises

• River cruises are as the most attractive way of discovering the different places, landscapes and peoples of the interior of Goa. There are various alternatives to visit the tourist attractions, from short journeys of a couple of hours to journeys lasting one to two days, with the possibility of staying overnight on the boat.
• Launch the rivers Mandovi, Zuari and Chapora – and the Cumbarjua Canal – as pilot phase to showcase results and raise awareness. The programme will implement good practices in the process and will replicate the experience along other major navigable rivers in Goa.

Key issues to be addressed
• Review of the CRZ Regulations to facilitate growth of tourism on
the banks of rivers.
• Review of the ‘No Development Zones’ to facilitate development of existing jetties with minimum infrastructure for tourism activities (extending up to 100m from the river banks or the width of the river.
• Unparalleled growth of Mangroves in private paddy fields beyond the banks of the rivers is another issue that needs to be attended.
• Address the potential environmental impacts associated with the
development of the programme
• Public-Private Partnerships

Discovering the destination in a relaxed manner on a vessel taking in the lush greens, calm waters and varied fauna








Benchmark and character images







Agro tourism (spice farms/ homestays and agro farms)


Commercial strategy • For those seeking for truly authentic touristic experiences, those who want to be integrated in the local community, going to villages, seeing how people live, share meals with them, better understand their culture
Implementat ion strategy • Progressive implementation across the territory starting with the adaptation and improvement of those tourism products that are currently being exploited in Goa. In a next phase, the programme will continue with the development and adaptation of assets that are lesser known or whose potential is to be realised.
Key issues to be addressed
• There is no an adequate policy for farm land tourism. Current laws are restrictive with regard to development of tourism activities in farm or orchard lands.
• The present regulation and Act should be replaced by a more proactive and practical one.
• Licenses for the touristic exploitation of the attractions
• Quality standards and certifications
• Tourist guide training programmes
• Support in the promotion


Offering the real life of the Goans to those tourists who are eager to discover their culture




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
In the areas of Molem, Ponda
outskirts, Netravali and Quepem -



Benchmark and character images





Nature Sanctuaries


Key issues to be addressed
• Consultation and agreement with the entity in charge of sanctuaries
• Identify best international and national best practices
• Integrated approach to include benefits for local stakeholders
• Ensure funding for these initiatives

Draft for discuss3ion
Based around local fauna/ flora with an orientation towards environmental promotion






Benchmark and character images














Key issues to be addressed

• Differentiate Goa from other tourism destinations in India and other international competitors.

Market strategy • Mainly domestic and foreign tourists
• Day and overnight visitors (including day cruise visitors)



The “Slow Movement “Culture concept applied to Wellness in Goa

The slow movement advocates a cultural shift toward slowing down life's pace. It began in 1986. Over time, this developed into a subculture in other areas, like the Cittaslow organisation for "slow cities". The "slow“ epithet has subsequently been applied to a variety of activities and aspects of culture.
Geir Berthelsen and his creation of The World Institute of Slowness presented a vision in 1999 for an entire "slow planet" and a need to teach the world the way of slowness. Carl Honoré's 2004 book, In Praise of Slowness, first explored how the Slow philosophy might be applied in every field of human endeavour and coined the phrase "slow movement". The Financial Times said the book is "to the Slow Movement
what Das Kapital is to communism Honoré describes the Slow Movement thus:
"It is a cultural revolution against the notion that faster is always better. The Slow philosophy is not about doing everything at a snail's pace. It's about seeking to do everything at the right speed. Savoring the hours and minutes rather than just counting them. Doing everything as well as possible, instead of as fast as possible. It’s about quality over quantity in everything from work to food to parenting.“
Professor Guttorm Fløistad summarises the philosophy, stating:
"The only thing for certain is that everything changes. The rate of change increases. If you want to hang on you better speed up. That is the message of today. It could however be useful to remind everyone that our basic needs never change. The need to be seen and appreciated! It is the need to belong. The need for nearness and care, and for a little love! This is given only through slowness in human relations. In order to master changes, we have to recover slowness, reflection and togetherness. There we will find real renewal."[
The slow movement is not organised and controlled by a single organisation. A fundamental characteristic of the slow movement is that it is propounded, and its momentum maintained, by individuals who constitute the expanding global community of Slow. Its popularity has grown considerably since the rise of slow food and Cittaslow in Europe, with slowness initiatives spreading as far as Australia and Japan.

Goa’s lifestyle – “susegad” – paired with existing wellness centres that offer treatments which philosophy matches the Slow Movement” culture, creates a framework under which a Goa’s Wellness concept could be included.
The concept is broad enough to include many of the traditional Indian therapies such as Ayurveda, Yoga and others; as well as any other treatments. And it would help position Goa.

Draft for discuss4ion
Wellness destination centers: Focus on new development in the hinterlands





Benchmark and character images




Nature clusters

Product: Nature-based tourism
Flagship programme Quick wins

Timeframe: Medium term
Concept and objectives • It is a concept that arises from combining one or various key assets with other natural or cultural attractions located nearby. The clustering of assets contributes to increasing its attractiveness, generating more visits and delaying the time of the visits.
• The accommodation offering gives visitors the opportunity to stay overnight in the area
• The cluster will be characterised by maintaining a set of shared services.



Market strategy • Tourists (domestic and foreign) and resident population
• Day and overnight visitors (including day cruise visitors)
Commercial strategy • Programme that helps improve the tourist experience at the destination through the offering (as a complement to coastal tourism) of a 2 or 3 day break to discover the biodiversity of an inner area that remains unspoiled







Implementation strategy • Launch pilot cluster with base in Molem village (Satari) and the combination of: Bhagwan Mahaveer Sanctuary, Dudhsagar waterfalls, Tambdi Surla Temple, Atreya Vedic Spice Farm – and add one man- made attraction (i.e. Forest Adventure Park for families).
• After the pilot phase the programme will implement good practices in the processes and will replicate the experience in other talukas.
Key issues to be addressed
• Alignment with the regional plan. Present laws which restrict construction of hotels in orchard and agricultural land should be revised and adapted for specific high interest projects. Though it is necessary to protect the hinterland from over exploitation, any limited exploitation that is permitted should allow the investor, under specific standards, to create a world class facility and not a ramshackle hut or a tent, where tourists feel unwelcome.
• Improvement of the key assets, as well as of other natural or cultural assets that are part of the cluster
• Labels and quality certifications
• Ecotourism goes one step further and contributes to reduce the
negative impacts of tourism by developing products, activities and facilities that safeguard and enhance local environments, biodiversity and culture.


Nature-based hubs located in the hinterland comprising nature and culture assets, man-made attractions and accommodation


Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
4 main clusters: one in each of the hinterland talukas: Sattari, Dharbandora, Sanguem and Canacona
Specified in subsequent slides



Nature Cluster – Pilot project zoom in




Pilot project description


The Pilot project will have its base in Molem Village since it has an accommodation offer today (e.g.
Dudhsagar Spa Resort) and includes a mix of nature, culture and entertainment based activities and attractions.
Visits to this cluster could still be made on a Day Trip basic, however the concept is to generate enough activities for 2 – 3 days visits which at the same time gives the opportunity for accommodation.


The cluster will be characterised by maintaining a set of shared services.



Benchmark and character images



Product: Nature-based tourism
Flagship programme Quick wins

Timeframe: short term











Key issues to be addressed

• Review of the Tourist Trade Act 1982, which was deemed inadequate to deal with various situations that have arisen
– consider the need to amend or replace in consultation with the tourism stakeholders.
• Address the potential environmental impacts associated with the development of the program - since these types of tourism activities and experiences might cause greater territorial impacts, the proposal is that these activities would have to be developed in areas of lower
environmental value.





Pernem Karnataka
Pernem

Bardez Bicholim
Mapusa Bicholim Sattari
North Goa Sattari
Panaji
Tiswadi
Dudhsagar
Vasco da Gama Ponda Base Camp
Mormugao Dharbandora
Ponda Dharbandora
malo –
de Island Margao
Salcette
Majorda beach Sanguem
Quepem Sanguem
Arabian Sea
South Goa
Quepem

Chaudi
Canacona Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Pilot projects: Bogmalo – Grande Island and its environs for scuba diving; Majorda for water based sports; Dudhsagar Base Camp and Vagueri hills Base Camp; Selaulim, Amthane and Anjunem dams

N/A
Description and tasks
• Determine the list of adventure and sports tourism that are present or could be developed in Goa. Prepare and activity calendar specifying key annual events.
• Establish minimum safety and general operations standards for each type of practice
• Provide certification labels for both companies and individuals (guides and monitors)
• Creation of signposted and secured trekking routes in the mountains like ‘Hiking Trails’ in Europe. Developing of a network of hiking and biking trails in each main hinterland taluka using picturesque landscapes and interesting nature sports.
• Creation of cycle trails near selected rivers (Mandovi, Zuari, Chapora) to discover natural and cultural aspects of the hinterland. Cycle trails can also be developed within nature parks and sanctuaries (optional).
• Development of nature sport trails for mountain bikes, quads, motorbikes, etc. in order to develop the practice and contain environmental impacts. Identify the most degraded areas in order to develop bike & enduro parks (optional).
• Promotion of scuba diving in Goa emphasizing safety standards
• Creation of standards and training of guides emphasizing safety issues




Benchmark and character images















Draft for discussion
Nature Based Programs – Initial investment concepts

Estimations refer to the costs of building one unit/ facility

Programs cost concept Unit of Cost per Number of Total Cost measure unit (INR) units (INR Cr.) Financial Model
Public Private
1.- Discovery River Cruises (EF) Network of stops (jetties and
Jetties/ Port 68,810,000 1 6.88 100%
small ports for cruise ships
2.- Agrotourism (Spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms) Improvement of Farms Lump sum 1,720,250 N/A 0.17 50% 50%

Improvement of Homestays Lump sum 1,032,150 N/A 0.1 50% 50%


3.- Nature Sanctuaries (EF) Adaptation for tourism use + basic facilities: Welcome centre,
ticketing, souvenir shop, F&B Lump sum 4,128,600 N/A 0.4 100%
outlet, toilets, parking,
signposting within premises, etc.
4.- ‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres
Resort/ Centre Keys 2,752,400 50 13,76 100%

5.- Nature Cluster (EF) Adaptation for tourism use and
improvement of key assets that Lump sum 55,048,000 N/A 5.5 100% form part of the cluster
6.- Adventure & Sports Tourism Man-made multisport
Unit 206,430,000 1 20.64 100%
destination/ Adventure Park*
These costs do not include the cost of land
(*) Investment is subject to specific project conditions and may vary largely depending on location, site preparation, park construction works and development program

Nature Based Programs – Estimated initial investment (phased over the next 10
years)


N-B Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Discovery River Cruises (EF) 5 Jetties/ Small ports
34.4
17.2
17.2
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2.- Agrotourism (Spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms)
10 Farms + 1,000 homestays

104.9

35.0

35.0

35.0

-

-

-

-

-

-

-
3.- Nature Sanctuaries (EF) 6 Nature Sanctuaries
2.5
0.8
0.8
0.8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4.- ‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres
5 Resorts/ Centres
68.8
22.9
22.9
22.9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5.- Nature Cluster (EF) 4 Clusters
22.0
-
-
7.3
7.3
7.3
-
-
-
-
-
6.- Adventure & Sports Tourism
1 Man-made park
20.6
10.3
10.3
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Total N-B Programs Budget
253.3
86.3
86.3
66.1
7.3
7.3
-
-
-
-
-

(%) 100% 34.06% 34.06% 26.09% 2.90% 2.90% - - - - -


Nature Based Programs – Reinvestment (1.5% of estimated initial investment)


N-B Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Discovery River Cruises (EF) 5 Jetties/ Small ports
4.1
-
-
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
2.- Agrotourism (Spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms)
10 Farms + 1,000 homestays

12.6

-

0.5

1.0

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6
3.- Nature Sanctuaries (EF) 6 Nature Sanctuaries
0.3
-
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.- ‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres
5 Resorts/ Centres
8.3
-
0.3
0.7
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
5.- Nature Cluster (EF) 4 Clusters 2.0 - - - 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
6.- Adventure & Sports Tourism
1 Man-made park
2.5
-
-
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
Total N-B Programs Budget
29.7
-
0.9
2.6
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.8
3.8
3.8
3.8
(%) 100% 100% - 2.96% 8.70% 12.04% 12.41% 12.78% 12.78% 12.78% 12.78%



N-B Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Discovery River Cruises (EF) 5 Jetties/ Small ports
38.5
17.2
17.2
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
2.- Agrotourism (Spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms)
10 Farms + 1,000 homestays

117.5

35.0

35.5

36.0

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6

1.6
3.- Nature Sanctuaries (EF) 6 Nature Sanctuaries
2.8
0.8
0.8
0.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.- ‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres
5 Resorts/ Centres
77.1
22.9
23.3
23.6
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
5.- Nature Cluster (EF) 4 Clusters 24.0 - - 7.3 7.4 7.6 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
6.- Adventure & Sports Tourism
1 Man-made park
23.1
10.3
10.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
Total N-B Programs Budget

283.0

86.3

87.1

68.7

10.9

11.0

3.8

3.8

3.8

3.8

3.8
(%) 100% 30.48% 30.79% 24.26% 3.86% 3.90% 1.34% 1.34% 1.34% 1.34% 1.34%



Nature-based Budget Total Distribution by Program

Adventure & Sports




Discovery

Nature-based Budget Public Vs. Private

Tourism, 8.2%

Nature Cluster (EF), 8.5%

River Cruises
(EF), 13.6%


Public, 43.8%



‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres, 27.2%








Nature Sanctuaries (EF), 1.0%



Agrotourism (Spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms), 41.5%


Private, 56.2%




Total expected cost
(over the next 10 years)
INR 283 Cr.

Nature Based Programs – Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures (2% of estimated initial investment)



N-B Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Discovery River Cruises (EF) 5 Jetties/ Small ports
5.5
- -
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
2.- Agrotourism (Spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms)

10 Farms
Not Estimated
3.- Nature Sanctuaries (EF) 6 Nature Sanctuaries
0.4
-
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
4.- ‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres
5 Resorts/ Centres Not
Estimated
5.- Nature Cluster (EF) 4 Clusters 2.6 - - - 0.1 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4
6.- Adventure & Sports Tourism
1 Man-made park Not Estimated
Total N-B Programs Budget
8.5
-
-
0.7
0.9
1.0
1.2
1.2
1.2
1.2
1.2
(%) 100% - 0.19% 8.44% 10.35% 12.07% 13.79% 13.79% 13.79% 13.79% 13.79%

Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures refers to maintenance, cleanliness and security of the facility Private annual recurrent expenses related with Facility Management are not estimated

Nature Based Programs – Financing Options

Nature Based Program Initiatives
Discovery River Cruises (EF) Agro tourism (spice farms/ homestays and agro farms) Nature Sanctuaries (EF) Slow Movement’ Wellness Centers Nature Clusters (EF) Adventure & Sports Tourism
 State and Central government support for development of rivers


 Private participation in financing of individual projects  State and Central government support for development of area

 Private participation in financing of individual projects  Central government support for funding

 Private participation in financing of individual projects  State government funding for development of the hinterland

 Private participation in financing of individual projects  State government support for funding


 Central government support  PPP funding through the BOOT model

 Private participation in financing of individual projects
 Funding support can also be attained through hotel chains and multilateral organizations for developing model tourist experience destinations

Nature Based Programs – Summary


Program Flagship program ‘Quick win’ Short term Medium term Long term Public Private Public Private
1.- Discovery River Cruises (EF)    PPP Support Lead
2.- Agrotourism (Spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms)



Support
Lead
Support
Lead

3.- Nature Sanctuaries (EF)


Lead
-
Lead Service contract
4.- ‘Slow Movement’ Wellness Centres   Support Lead Support Lead
5.- Nature Cluster (EF)  PPP PPP
6.- Adventure & Sports Tourism  Support Lead Support Lead









Short term: within 3 years Medium term: 3 - 5 years Long term: 5 years/ above

Leisure & Entertainment Programs
Waterfront Promenades
Panaji, Colva, Chapora, Old Goa and Mayem Lake


Flagship programs Quick Wins









Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park)
In the vicinity of the proposed Mopa airport



Gaming Cluster
Organised gaming clusters along with shifting of the offshore casinos to the Chapora or Chicalim Bay


Golf Courses
1 in the hinterland/ 1 in vicinity of Mopa airport subject to space availability and Govt. norms



Waterfront promenades




Commercial strategy • Waterfront cities with unique urban structure and programs that draw international attention
Implementati
on strategy • Launch a pilot project in Panaji, using as a framework the recently-approved city masterplan.
• After the pilot project, the programme will implement good practices in the processes and will replicate the experience in other major cities along the coast and some river

Key issues to be addressed

• There is a masterplan approved for the development of Panaji city which already proposes a promenade along the coastline between Miramar and Dona Paula.
• Organise and regularise all the uses and activities along the length of the route. This could generate controversy and negative reactions against the plan



Enhancing tourism use and attraction for both locals and tourists




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Panaji, Colva, Chapora, Old Goa and
Mayem Lake N/A



Benchmark and character images






Family entertainment district


Key issues to be addressed

• Selection of the most suitable place to locate the project
• Infrastructure improvements envisaged – road access and transportation. Straight connection from/ to the airport will be needed
• Address the potential environmental impacts associated with the development of the program - since these types of tourism activities and experiences might cause greater territorial impacts, the proposal is that these activities would have to be developed in areas of lower environmental value.

A leisure & entertainment hub for the family offering a themed park, F&B, shopping an accommodation





Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
In the vicinity of the proposed Mopa airport N/A



Benchmark and character images







Gaming cluster


Commercial strategy • Goa will offer a lively and properly- organized cluster on/off shore cluster located outside of Panaji city
Implementati on strategy • The relocation proposal, either further inland or on floating casinos in the bays of Chapora or Chicalim should be carried out in a planned and progressive way. The first step should be to stop the approval of new licences and subsequently provide a margin (2 to 5 years) for casinos to relocate.


Key issues to be addressed

• Keeping the gaming activity as a major source of income and an attraction for this tourism, while controlling and mitigating its negative image?
• Not to be mixed with any other types of entertainment and leisure activities
• Casinos are seen as a negative influence on society in general and youth in particular.
• There is also opposition to the so called offshore casinos, which refuse to go onshore.

A proper organized on/ off shore cluster located outside of Panaji city

Draft for discuss3ion






Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Organized gaming clusters along with shifting of the offshore casinos to the Chapora or Chicalim Bay
N/A



Benchmark and character images








Golf courses


Key issues to be addressed

• In addition to the 9—hole golf course at the Lalit hotel in South Goa, another 9-hole golf course is already planned with the Four Seasons hotel next to Tiracol Fort
• Construction of a golf course with due regard to the Goan landscape and environs.
• Possible incompatibility with the land use scheme proposed in the Regional Plan.
• Address the potential environmental impacts associated with the development of the programme

Draft for discuss4ion
An eco-friendly 9-hole golf course paired with a renown international hotel brand




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
1 in the hinterland/ 1 in vicinity of Mopa Airport subject to space availability and Govt. norms
30 ha / 9-hole golf course



Benchmark and character images








Leisure & Entertainment Programs – Initial investment concepts

Estimations refer to the costs of building one unit/ facility

Programs cost concept Unit of Cost per Number of Total Cost measure unit (INR) units (INR Cr.) Financial Model
Public Private

1.- Waterfront Promenades Construction of 1 Km of
Linear metre 13,762 1,000 1.37 100%
Promenade
2.- Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park) Themed Park + 3 Themed Hotels
(950 keys) + 700 Serviced
District 2,752.4 Cr. 1 2752.4 100%
Apartments + 30,000 sq. m. of
retail

3.- Gaming Cluster Relocation of existing casinos
either inland (Cluster) or to District 55,048,000 1 5.5 100% another Bay + Parking
4.- Golf Course Eco-friendly Executive Golf
Hole 220,192,000 9 22.01 100%
course











These costs do not include the cost of land
(*) Investment is subject to specific project conditions and may vary largely depending on location, site preparation, golf course construction works and development program

Leisure & Entertainment Programs – Estimated initial investment (phased over the next 10 years)



L&E Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Waterfront Promenades 14 km of Promenade
19.3
9.6
9.6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2.- Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park)

1 District

2752.4

-

-

-

-

-

550.5

550.5

550.5

550.5

550.5
3.- Gaming Cluster 1 Cluster 5.5 1.8 1.8 1.8 - - - - - - -
4.- Golf Course 1 Golf Course 22.0 - - - - - - - 7.3 7.3 7.3
Total L&E Programs Budget
2799.2
11.5
11.5
1.8
-
-
550.5
550.5
557.8
557.8
557.8
(%) 100% 0.41% 0.41% 0.07% - - 19.67% 19.67% 19.93% 19.93% 19.93%

Leisure & Entertainment Programs – Reinvestment (1.5% of estimated initial

Draft for discussion

investment)



L&E Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Waterfront Promenades 14 km of Promenade
2.3
-
-
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
2.- Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park)

1 District

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-
3.- Gaming Cluster 1 Cluster 0.6 - - - 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
4.- Golf Course 1 Golf Course - - - - - - - - - - -
Total L&E Programs Budget
2.9
-
-
0.3
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
(%) 100% - - 10.00% 12.86% 12.86% 12.86% 12.86% 12.86% 12.86% 12.86%



L&E Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Waterfront Promenades 14 km of Promenade
21.6
9.6
9.6
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
2.- Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park)

1 District

2,752.4

-

-

-

-

-

550.5

550.5

550.5

550.5

550.5
3.- Gaming Cluster 1 Cluster 6.1 1.8 1.8 1.8 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
4.- Golf Course 1 Golf Course 22.0 - - - - - - - 7.3 7.3 7.3
Total L&E Programs Budget

2,802.1

11.5

11.5

2.1

0.4

0.4

550.9

550.9

558.2

558.2

558.2
(%) 100% 0.41% 0.41% 0.08% 0.01% 0.01% 19.66% 19.66% 19.92% 19.92% 19.92%



Leisure & Entertainment Budget Total Distribution by Program

Leisure & Entertainment Budget Public Vs. Private

Gaming

Waterfront

Golf Course, 0.8%

Cluster, 0.2% Promenades,
0.8%











Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park), 98.2%

Public, 0.8%


Private, 99.2%





Total expected cost
(over the next 10 years)
INR 2802.1 Cr.

Leisure & Entertainment Programs – Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures (2% of estimated initial investment)



L&E Programs Yearly Budget Number of projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Waterfront Promenades 14 km of Promenade
3.1
-
-
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
2.- Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park)

1 District
Not estimated

3.- Gaming Cluster
1 Cluster Not estimated
4.- Golf Course 1 Golf Course Not estimated
Total L&E Programs Budget
3.1
-
-
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
(%) 100% - - 12.50% 12.50% 12.50% 12,50% 12.50% 12.50% 12.50% 12.50%







Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures refers to maintenance, cleanliness and security of the facility Private annual recurrent expenses related with Facility Management are not estimated

Leisure & Entertainment Programs– Financing Options


Leisure & Entertainment Program Initiatives
Waterfront Promenades Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park) Gaming Cluster Golf Course
 State and Central government support for development of sea face and river fronts  PPP model of financing for key projects

 Private funding for individual projects  Private funding for individual projects  Financing through global private firms

 Funding by top star hotel chains to give exclusivity to tourists

Leisure & Entertainment Programs – summary




Program Flagship program ‘Quick win’ Short term Medium term Long term Public Private Public Private

1.- Waterfront Promenades



Lead
Support
Lead Service
contract
2.- Family Entertainment District (inclusive of Themed Park)


Support
Lead
-
Lead
3.- Gaming Cluster   Support Lead - Lead
4.- Golf Course  - Lead - Lead









Short term: within 3 years Medium term: 3 - 5 years Long term: 5 years/ above

MICE (Meetings, incentives, conferences & exhibitions) & Weddings Programs




Convention Centre + Ancillary facilities (including Hotels)
Vicinity of proposed Mopa airport (Pernem) or Panaji in Dona Paula area – subject to
availability of land






Mass Events
Shyama Prasad Indoor Stadium, Vagator and Candolim







Weddings and Incentive Trips
All across Goan Hotels and ancillary facilities at the Convention Centre




Flagship programs Quick Wins



Convention Centre + ancillary facilities (including hotels)


Product: MICE & Weddings tourism
Flagship program Quick wins

Timeframe: Long term


• MICE tourism is a good way to attract tourists out of the high season and weekends and fill up hotels during the low season. It is also a good way to take tourist away from the most concentrated tourism areas.
• Though meetings are well develop in Goa, large conventions are not, as there is no Convention and Exhibition centre in the capital. In order to adapt to the market and offer this tourism product, Goa needs a proper Convention Centre with capacity for up to 10,000 people as well as improve the value chain and complementary







Key issues to be addressed

• It must be in close proximity to transportation and airport access routes

products serviced with these facilities. The Convention Centre
should be part of a mixed-use complex also offering retail, F&B
and accommodation options.

• Friendliness and attractiveness of the destination is as important as the development of the complex
• Other attractions besides the meeting facilities are also necessary to create interest in the city as a destination – people coming to the Conference Centre may be attracted commercial/ leisure/ entertainment attractions. Maybe there is an interesting link of this program to the Family Entertainment District (see Leisure & Entertainment programs)
• Also, existing hotel facilities must adapt to MICE products (addition of new units should be also contemplated) so that enough rooms and conference space is available

A world-class Convention Centre in the vicinity of the proposed Mopa airport to launch Goa as a competitive destination for MICE tourism



Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Vicinity of proposed Mopa airport (Pernem) or Panaji in Dona Paula area
– subject to availability of land
-



Benchmark and character images










Mass events


Key issues to be addressed

• Ideally in close proximity to transportation and airport access or facilitation must be provided
• Keep current events and also generate new ones
• Ensure maximum professionalism in the organization of the event and mitigate potential nuisance to local residents and to the overall tourism image of Goa
• Involve multiple local stakeholders: public, private, and civil society













Market
strategy • To promote Goa’s uniqueness and make “noise” about Goa
as a lively and entertaining place


Mass events should focus on the low season and be supportive to Goa’s tourism positioning




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
Shyama Prasad Indoor Stadium, Vagator and Candolim N/A



Benchmark and character images









Weddings and incentive trips


Commercial strategy • Goa is a unique and vibrant place to celebrate a wedding or an incentive trip
Implementati on strategy • Establish a marketing club of a number of high quality properties, starting with those already working on the development and promotion of weddings and incentive trips.

Key issues to be addressed

• Activities related to skills, local culture, sports, adventure tourism, nature, food and drinks should be also developed to offer an attractive weddings and incentive trips product.
• Better policies and promotions for developing the destination wedding market
• Dissemination of information on key modalities and procedures including public performance license, sound restrictions, Visa formalities and wedding registration would facilitate development of this product
• Development of complementary tourism products like wellness, adventure tourism and others to improve on the average length of stay of tourists during MICE visits.


Goa by virtue of its lush green forests and fields, as well as its picturesque beaches is a key venue for destination weddings




Potential locations Facilities and land requirements
All across Goan Hotels and ancillary facilities at the Convention Centre -



Benchmark and character images








MICE & Weddings Programs – Initial investment concepts

Estimations refer to the costs of building one unit/ facility

Programs cost concept Unit of Cost per Number of Total Cost measure unit (INR) units (INR Cr.) Financial Model
Public Private

1.- Convention Centre + ancillary facilities (including Hotels)* Convention Centre to cater for
Sq. m. 47,135 10,000 47.1 100%
up to 10,000 people
Ancillary facilities of the
Convention Centre including Keys 68,810 60,000 412.8 100% several 4-star Hotels (1,000 keys)
2.- Mass Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
3.- Weddings and Incentive Trips
N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A














These costs do not include the cost of land
(*) Investment is subject to specific project conditions and may vary largely depending on location, site preparation, marina construction works and development program

MICE & Weddings Programs – Estimated initial investment (phased over the next 10 years)



M&W Programs Number of
Yearly Budget projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Convention Centre + 1 Convention ancillary facilities Centre + ancillary
(including Hotels) facilities
460.0
-
-
-
-
-
153.3
153.3
153.3
-
-
2.- Mass Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
3.- Weddings and
N/A
Incentive Trips
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Total M&W Programs Budget
460.0
-
-
-
-
-
153.3
153.3
153.3
-
-
(%) 100% - - - - - 33.33% 33.33% 33.33% - -

MICE & Weddings Programs – Reinvestment (1.5% of estimated initial investment)


M&W Programs Number of
Yearly Budget projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Convention Centre + 1 Convention ancillary facilities Centre + ancillary
(including Hotels) facilities
13.8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6.9
6.9
2.- Mass Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
3.- Weddings and
N/A
Incentive Trips
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Total M&W Programs Budget
13.8
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
6.9
6.9
(%) 100% - - - - - - - - 50.00% 50.00%



M&W Programs Number of
Yearly Budget projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Convention Centre + 1 Convention ancillary facilities Centre + ancillary
(including Hotels) facilities
473.8
-
-
-
-
-
153.3
153.3
153.3
6.9
6.9
2.- Mass Events N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
3.- Weddings and
N/A
Incentive Trips
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Total M&W Programs Budget
473.8
-
-
-
-
-
153.3
153.3
153.3
6.9
6.9
(%) 100% - - - - - 32.36% 32.36% 32.36% 1.46% 1.46%



MICE & Weddings Budget Total Distribution by Program

MICE & Weddings Budget Public Vs. Private


Public, 0.0%





Total expected cost
(over the next 10 years)
INR 473.8 Cr.

MICE & Weddings Programs – Operating expenditures (2% of estimated initialDraft for discussion
investment)



M&W Programs Number of
Yearly Budget projects Total (INR Cr.)
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
1.- Convention Centre + 1 Convention ancillary facilities Centre + ancillary
(including Hotels) facilities
18.4
9.2
9.2
2.- Mass Events 6 Events/ Year 20.6 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1
3.- Weddings and Incentive Trips
Not estimated
Total M&W Programs Budget
39.0
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
2.1
11.3
11.3
(%) 100% 5.29% 5.29% 5.29% 5.29% 5.29% 5.29% 5.29% 5.29% 28.85% 28.85%











Facility Management Recurrent Expenditures refers to maintenance, cleanliness and security of the facility Private annual recurrent expenses related with Facility Management are not estimated

MICE & Weddings Programs – Financing Options


MICE & Weddings Program Initiatives
Convention Centre + ancillary facilities (including Hotels) Mass Events Weddings and Incentive Trips
 Financing options would include PPP with major F&B brands and hotel chains entering into BOT contract with the State government

 Private funding for individual projects  Funding support can be attained through theme parks and tourism firms

 Private funding for individual projects  Funding through global tourism companies with support from State government

 Private funding for individual projects

MICE & Weddings Programs – summary






Program Flagship program ‘Quick win’ Short term Medium term Long term Public Private Public Private
1.- Convention Centre + Ancillary facilities (including Hotels)


PPP
PPP
2.- Mass Events   PPP PPP
3.- Weddings and Incentive Trips   Support Lead - Lead












Short term: within 3 years Medium term: 3 - 5 years Long term: 5 years/ above

Tourism Programs - Estimated costing overview
Consolidated Yearly Budget Total (INR Cr.) Private investment (INR cr.) (%) Public Investment (INR cr.) (%)
Coastal 493.0 368.8 74.8% 124.2 25.2%
Culture & Heritage 144.6 2.9 2.0% 141.7 98.0%
Nature Based 283.0 159 56.2% 124 43.8%
Leisure & Entertainment 2,802 2,778.6 99.2% 23.4 0.8%
MICE & Weddings 473.8 473.8 100.0% - -
Total 4196.6 3,785.3 90.2% 411.3 9.8%





MICE &

Budget
Total Distribution by Program

Coastal, 11.7%

Budget
Public Vs. Private



Public, 9.8%

Weddings,
11.3%

Leisure & Entertain ment,

Culture & Heritage, 3.4%
Nature Based, 6.7%





Total expected cost (over the next 10 years) INR 4196.6 Cr.





Private, 90.2%




Consolidated Number of beds Number of rooms
Total investment (in INR Cr.)

2021 2026 2031
84,991 119,204 167,189
42,497 59,603 83,595
4,142 7,041.4 9,845.2




Current Classification Number of beds Star-rating Number of INR/ Incremental
rooms Unit Investment in INR Cr.
Category A 17,177 5-star 8,589 82,57,200 1,434
Category B 21,198 4-star 10,599 55,04,800 1,479
Category C 18,923 3-star 9,462 27,52,400 718
Category D 27,636 2-star and below 13,318
13,76,200 505
Homestay 500
Category Heritage 57 Heritage 29 20,64,300 5.9
Total by 2021 84,991 - 42,497 - 4,142

* At 2016 prices


Current Classification No. of beds Star-rating Number of rooms INR/ Incremental Investment
Unit in INR Cr.
Category A 24,092 5-star 12,046 82,57,200 2,854.5
Category B 29,731 4-star 14,866 55,04,800 2,370.9
Category C 26,540 3-star 13,270 27,52,400 1,048.1

Category D 38,761 2-star and below 18,631 731.2
13,76,200
34.4
Homestay 750
Category Heritage 80 Heritage 40 20,64,300 2.3
Total by 2026 119,204 - 59,603 - 7,041.4

Current Classification No. of beds Star-rating Number of rooms INR/ Incremental Investment
Unit in INR Cr.
Category A 33,790 5-star 16,895 82,57,200 4,003.9
Category B 41,699 4-star 20,850 55,04,800 3,294.1
Category C 37,224 3-star 18,612 27,52,400 1,470.3

Category D 54,364 2-star and below 26,182 1,039.2
13,76,200
34.4
Homestay 1,000
Category Heritage 112 Heritage 56 20,64,300 3.3
Total by 2031 167,189 - 83,595 - 9.845.2




Key initiative is the Coastal Tourism Circuit which are being carried out through procurement of Govt. of


Regeneration/ Upgradation of Popular Beaches India funds under The Swadesh Darshan scheme. Some key projects of this include the following:
• Provision of public amenities at Baga, Candolim, Vagator, Anjuna and Morjim beaches
• Toilets
• Cloak room
• Drinking water
• Changing/ shower rooms
• Development of parking lot at Calangute
• Dust Bins, Solar powered street lighting, tourism signage's, installation of CCTV cameras and Wi-Fi
facilities at various beaches in Goa
• Procurement of 200 mobile bio toilets









Tourism circuits – 26 types



• Military: Forts
• Religious : Churches/ Temples/ Mosques
• Portuguese heritage/ legacy:
Churches/ Houses
• Goa Old Town (City tour to places of historical/ cultural importance)
• Charming villages
• Handicrafts route in villages (‘Azulejos’ Tiles, Coconut, Woodcraft, Terracotta, Pottery)
• Prehistoric sites
(Petroglyphs, Caves)
• Culinary Tourism route
(including Feni & Wine)
• Best of Culture

• Scenic Routes
• Wildlife Sanctuaries and National Parks
• Farms: Spice/ Cashew/ Areca nut/ Coconut/ Rubber
• Animal sighting
• Birding
• Protected marine life (turtle nesting, dolphin experiences and corals)
• Backwaters exploration
• Reptile/ Amphibian/ Insect viewing
• Best of Nature

• River Cruise
• Train route from N to S and W to E
• Bicycle tracks near rivers/ in Natural Parks
• Trekking routes
• Coastal circuits:
• Forts
• Old Town
• Turtle nesting
• View Point
• Hinterland circuits:
• Spice Farms
• Wildlife
• Waterfalls
• River Cruise
• Wellness in nature
• Panaji Circuit
• Fontainhas
• Mandovi River Cruise
• Bird Sanctuary
• Old Goa
• Best of Goa

Connectivity Strategy – Tourism circuits infrastructure needs – culture & heritage


Connectivity Strategy – tourism circuits infrastructure needs – nature/eco


Connectivity/ Infrastructure Strategy for tourism circuits to spread tourism across the state

Key facilitating Infrastructure:
• Interpretation/ Information centres
• Information kiosks and marketing material
• Circuit itineraries, including travel options (possibly posted on the website)
• Signage along circuits with asset descriptions on site
• Local guides, interpreters and translators
• Barrier free access and facilitating infrastructure for specially abled persons including paraphernalia
• Transportation Hubs
• Multiple accommodation types for various target travellers
• Food and drinking water facilities
• Town/ City/ Village walking routes with maps, along with standardised walkways and footpaths
• Quality, safety and hygiene programs
• Garbage management
• Foreign exchange kiosks at key tourism hotspots
• Kiosks providing subscriber identity module (SIM) cards at key tourism hotspots
• Information provision through websites and mobile applications, besides social media platforms
• Development of modes of mass transport between key tourism assets/ hotspots
• Provision of cycles and alternative modes of transport including electrically powered vehicles





























3.



Support tourism infrastructure Buy side infrastructure
Public amenities and services in Goa
Core infrastructure
Transport and connectivity
Human resource and training


Infrastructure Strategy – Support Infrastructure

Source: Public Works Department ; T E R I. 2012, Directions, Innovation and Strategies for Sustainable Development in Goa, National Health Mission


Air

• The Concession Agreement for setting up the Mopa airport has been signed in November 2016, and is expected to have a passenger handling capacity of 13.1 million per annum by 2036
• The airport is expected to be set up by 2019-20, and will boost air connectivity of Goa along with easing the capacity constraint at Dabolim
• Goa is well connected to major states across the country. Better connectivity to major cities besides Mumbai and Delhi is the need of the hour
• Goa currently has direct flight connectivity to destinations in the Middle East which forms a hub for international arrivals.
• Charters are an important mode of transport for international travelers, and promotion efforts should be made on attracting higher spend packages
• However, greater emphasis needs to be laid on attracting
Free Independent Travelers (FITs)
• The recently released National Civil Aviation Policy is expected to promote air connectivity across the nation, including the Regional connectivity programme

Source: RFQ Document for the Mopa Greenfield airport project



Connectivity Strategy – Tourism signage system

• The state has limited general signage and indeed a tourism signage system.
• A good and consistent sign posting system is extremely relevant in any tourist destination but even more for those like Goa, which is and can be visited mostly by road, thanks to short distances between attractions.
• Many of the new products that have been proposed for the Master Plan invite tourists to enjoy them best through circuits, mostly by road, though some also using river transportation.







Awareness programs Training programs

Support programs (Companies Incubator)


• HR Service Centres provide skills and support to local people to:
• create new businesses
• improve existing ones
• increase awareness
• carry out training and support programs


• Service Centers link the demand from local population to create Micro and Small Enterprises and the supply which take into consideration the gaps that exist in the rural tourism sector and the employment in Goa, especially in the hinterlands.
• The awareness centers provide a platform to interact with local stakeholders and design implementation strategies based on local strengths and opportunities, besides providing a platform for grass root engagement







Awareness programs Training programs

Support programs (Companies Incubator)



A website, on-line courses and an employment database, should also link all the centers and further facilitate human resource development
The implementation of Services centers for Human Resources Development will:
• Increase awareness of the importance of the development and at the same time competitiveness of tourism in Goa as a whole destination, as well as in the different coastal and hinterland tourism destinations.
• Increase the professionalism and know-how of the local stakeholders and public administrations for the development of a marketable higher-end and sustainable tourism in Goa. Increase the quality of services by providing skilled and educated human resources
• Increase the opportunities for local residents to take advantage of the development of tourism in Goa, especially those located in the Hinterlands.
• Provide support to entrepreneurs, professional improvement and creation of employment









• Provision for dedicated tourist police at tourist hotspots
• Specialized training for tourist police for interacting with tourists in Goa, including application of technology on ground
• Ensure collaboration between tourist police and other Department police personnel
• Personnel to ensure maintenance of law and order at tourist places, and assist the DoT in implementation
of its responsibilities under law.
• Collaboration between DoT and the Goa Institute of Public Administration Department (GIPARD) to impart requisite training to tourist police, along with relevant refresher courses
• Security awareness planning
• Training of tourist police to deal with emergency situations
• Monitoring of tourism hotspots and places real time, through a CCTV network
• Security awareness programs among tourist trade and other stakeholders
• Tourist information centers to convey information on safety and security
• Real time monitoring of deployment of tourist security force, and spread across the state
• Consistent and highly visible signage across the state, including at tourism assets





























4.

Commercialization & Promotion Tourism statistics collection framework
Destination C&P
Products C&P


Tourism intelligence unit




UNWTO’s (United Nations World Tourism Organization) TSA framework is a set of summary tables, with underlying data:
♦ inbound, domestic tourism and outbound tourism expenditure;
♦ internal tourism expenditure;
♦ production accounts of tourism industries;
♦ the Gross Value Added (GVA) and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) attributable to tourism;
♦ employment;
♦ investment;
♦ government consumption, and
♦ non-monetary indicators.


Tourism intelligence unit - Tourism Satellite Account (TSA)









Compile data from tax authorities,
and other public directories.

Set up specific Directory for main tourism activities to define a proper inference framework and obtain estimates for main economic supply variables.

Design applied inference method on
procurement of the Directory. The specification of a survey has to be derived to get estimates for each one of the Directory activities
DoT and GTDC to define the statistical scope of such estimates according to budget constraints and policy maker needs.

Forms, field survey organization
and training for field personnel are a key process for a successful survey.
DoT and GTDC to prepare a systematic and permanent yearly survey to producers.


Tourism intelligence unit - Tourism demand statistics collection framework

Program aim






Detailed expenditure form in surveys
applied to visitors leaving the country

Survey for residents who come back to the country
A field statistical process is required to apply the emissive tourism survey at the airport and main land frontier controls.

Accurate statistics for arriving and departing passengers is important to identify properly tourists, excursionists and workers who are involved in daily flows over the frontiers throughout the country.
Official accounting of people that arrive and leave the country every day should be defined. The estimate of tourism demand is based on these records

Specific surveys to households for domestic tourism estimates.
The inference framework and the field organization, as well as the questionnaires have to be worked out with international assistance.

Various physical and emotional elements experienced by tourists while visiting Goa
Physical elements Emotional elements



Unique Selling Proposition of Goa’s tourism offering
Unique Selling Proposition (USP):
• Tangible: Colonial past blended with idyllic inland landscapes
• Intangible: Goan “Susegad” lifestyle, reflecting in the citizens way of life (relaxed attitude and enjoyment of life to the fullest)
“Susegad” is a sense that prevails across the Goan countryside, in its culture and traditions. It is professed as a way of life in Goa, and presents a feeling of general contentment and well being.
This way of life encompasses Goa tourism resulting in repeat visits to the state, many a times across generations.
Differentiating factors:

• “Beach relax & party”: Goa is mainly known for its trance and beach parties that
is very restrictive in terms of market segments’ attractions.

However it is a strong differentiating factor, especially for the domestic market and should not be abandoned but up scaled and transformed into more and better experiences.
• Mix of cultures: Unique juxtaposition of Indian, Portuguese and Arabic heritage
• Nature and culture components along the coast and hinterlands are varied, widespread and easy to reach (short distances)


Getting tourists to associate certain keywords with Goa is a key aim of the Tourism Master Plan

Shared vision for Goa
‘Susegad’ lifestyle (relaxed attitude and enjoyment of life to the fullest)

World class experience Distinctive hospitality Local flavours Portuguese heritage Nature preserved
Entertainment/ lively destination Active / passive adventure Wellness destination Sustainable
Nightlife


Enhancing the Goa brand: Adding a Baseline and Story telling

Context & objective




• Recently a new brand was designed for Goa, development of which included a new logo and application manual
• As per international practice of many world destinations, there is an opportunity to further enhance the brand by adding a tag or baseline to the logo
• Moreover, a “story” or short text of Goa as a tourist destination could be written in order to describe the aspirational Goa tourism
• Finally, the brand could be still enhanced by adapting Goa’s defined colors to promotion materials, physical assets, merchandising, handicraft, etc. to be used as “symbols” that people will remember and associate with Goa’s destination personality.
Base line • A baseline, aims to highlight and summarize under a single word, group of words or sentence, the essence of what Goa can offer to tourists.
• While it is advisable to keep the same logo for a long term (10 years or more), baseline can be changed and adapted
every 5 years, if needed, to reflect what Goa wants to enhance as a destination.




Storytelling • A short text written by a Goan journalist or writer to synthetize the essence of Goa’s experience, could take Goa’s history as a guideline and introduce other concepts. This story /text, should be used as in introduction to all online and offline materials used to describe and differentiate the whole tourism destination
• Though visuals are important, if a story is character and narrative driven it has a better chance at striking an emotional chord with an audience. If a destination can tell a story that resonates emotionally with an audience, they can overcome just about anything.
• The strategic importance of storytelling for a tourism destination:
• Stories are hard for others to copy
• Good stories can result in lots of word-of-mouth
• Myths can be created
• Fascinating stories create curiosity
• Stories as catalyst of destination development


Your views on enhancing the new Goa brand: Baseline and Story telling










Base line

• A baseline, aims to highlight and summarize under a single word, group of words or sentence, the essence of what Goa can offer to tourists. While it is advisable to keep the same logo for a long term (10 years or more), baseline can be changed and adapted every 5 years, if needed, to reflect what Goa wants to enhance as a destination.
• Some examples of relevant domestic and international tourism destinations have been shown below
• Implementation guidelines:
• The baseline should serve to highlight the desired evolution of Goa from a pure beach destination towards an integrated coastal, cultural and nature-based destination, likely to attract higher spending tourists from both India and abroad. The tag or baseline should put forward the unique “blend” of natural and historic features, all present and enjoyable within short distances.
• Creative part to be developed by a specialized creative agency, under the guidance of and validation by Goa tourism stakeholders, from the public and private sectors.







Promotion strategy – Goa’s expenditure in marketing & promotion




Detailed Marketing Budget FY 15/16

* Amount in ‘000,000 (INR)

Tourism Marketing budgets Goa



Miscellaneous Advertisements, souveniers etc.
Printing of brochers, pamplets, banners and other such items State events - (e.g. Grape escapade, coconut and cashew festival) State events - (e.g. GITM, heritage and tripurari)
Infrastructure for State events State events - (e.g. Carnival and Shigmo) Media campaign spreads - Domestic Media campaign spreads - International
TA - DA Domestic TA - DA International
Domestic exhibitions - space booking
Domestic Road Shows International exhibitions - space booking Road show/ Exhibition - International

0.51
0.51







0.31



1.03




1.54


1.23
1.03
1.54
1.03









3.08






4.10




5.13


5.13





6.15


• The overall budget has been increased by 21% from 2014 to 2015, in line with total arrivals growth
• Marketing budget is today oriented to promotion of domestic tourism (61% of total expenditures), as this market is represents 90% of total arrivals.
8.71


Promotion strategy – Benchmark on marketing expenditure

























5 Goa





+ 50 M




+20 M





+2 M




1 or less M



0.5 M





50 M




40 M





15 M




5 M



0.57 M





1 USD or less




3-4 USD





5-6 USD




7-8 USD



0.4 USD

Key takeaways
• Countries with large amounts of international tourists arrivals spend around 1 dollar per arrival though they have the highest budgets
• In second-tier volume tourist destinations, the less tourist arrivals, the more average spending per arrival reaching around 8 USD
• Goa needs to invest a larger amount in international budget in order to get closer to the average spending. Nowadays it seems to be far away from the standards:
0.4 US$ versus 5 to 8 US$ per arrival in
comparable sample of destinations

• On the other hand, it is true that this highest spending needs to be mitigated because India’s marketing budget would to a certain extent cover this need, as it

promotes the country as a whole


SWOT on Goa’s Marketing Promotion & Communication

Strengths Weaknesses
• Brand positioning not clear; some of the brand attributes are not conducive to attracting high-end tourists.
• Low marketing budget

• Active promotions and focus on emerging tourism centers such as China by Bali tourism have helped in achieving a large growth in tourists.
• Catalan Tourist Board has redefined its mission and vision in order to lead Catalonia’s tourism development and marketing and achieve the goals of increasing tourist revenues



• Availability of Multiple Tourist Products & Resources to Develop Goa into a Top Destination
• Promote tourist arrivals from markets with high number of arrivals in India but low for Goa (USA, Canada)
• Attract tourists by launching a segmented communication by travel motivation and nationality
• Develop a strategy for marketing and communication by product
• Take profit of social media marketing to increase awareness and personalization without relevant additional spending
Opportunities




• Several Indian states are running aggressive international marketing campaigns and have potential to compete with Goa (Kerala is today the strongest competitor using aggressive and focused marketing & promotion techniques)
• Visibility in trade shows is increasing significantly for several Indian states
• e.g. “Barcelona is Much More” campaign gives reasons a tourist should visit the region of Barcelona and not only the city
Threats


Marketing Plan







Marketing Destination Goa as a whole: Proposed approach




Customer intelligence & Campaigns
Storage visitors information to launch

Smart Tourism Destination
Integration of all technologies into an Omni–channel Platform for a seamless digital experience for the end user throughout the whole

segmented campaigns and increase repeat
tourists’ rate

B2B, Events & Congress
It is important to share with

customer journey 8
7
1

Website
Good information platform but there’s a long path to deal with according to relational service, real time information and transactional agreements

intermediaries the new strategy, which 6
could be channeled through a newly established Convention Bureau for all MICE products
Social Media
Today Goa already has a good presence 5
on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram
4




Mobile APP
Explore the possibilities that bring new
2 mobile apps such as, geolocation, beacons or customized contents. It is a good mean to extract valuable information about the customer
3



Press, Publicity & Programmatic Marketing
A step forward needs to be done to develop a segmented and efficient communication through traditional channels and modern one

Key physical Contact Points
Implement ake advantage of key contact points in order to understand, relation and
inform our visitors


Marketing G0A Destination - Website



Frequent actions to be done Website of the future

Update the website periodically to maintain the quality of the information and use the latest technologies

Propose a page with recent news of the tourism industry
and of the country on the website

Create a restricted area for professionals and press

The website should be adapted to the different key
customer segments (language and design preferences)


The website should be available from all main searching engines optimization (SEO) (Google, Bing, etc)
Visitor reports and statistics should be extracted each month of the website in order to verify the frequency of
visits and the visitor characteristics






Digital Travel Planner






Photo sharing, interactive maps, wikis, widgets…






Forum where customers share its experience






Real stories of real customers (Malaysia web)


Marketing G0A Destination – Website evaluation



Detail Mark


Marketing G0A Destination - App



App technology solutions

Real time information such as social media, tourist information (traffic, events), advertising or reminders


Vehicle tracking (bus , metro, taxi, shared cars)

NFC tags and QR codes to access information about nearby points of interest

Tourist Complaints Management System


Proximity marketing Use of beacons



Multi-languages travel guide app which also offers available packages
Proximity marketing with beacons (special discounts, upgrades or cross selling)

Customized digital contents (self segmentation)



Customized digital contents



Interactive Audio guides


Marketing G0A Destination– Key contact points


Strategic methodology
• By knowing the locations of your signs, you will also be able to consider in the environment of the sign
• Identify your main audience and understanding exactly who you are creating content for. Measure how long will be your audience in front of the sign
• Do they need information to guide them? To educate them (tech them about products / services)? To entertain them?

• What do we want our visitors to do? (follow our social media, buy a product, visit a sight). Call- to-actions should be include in our content


• Content change frequency, who creates the content, brand voice / message guidelines…


Press & Publicity: Activities should be developed to communicate the tourism offer, the products and the brands to targeted audiences. In the case of Goa, it seems important to focus on the accessibility of information to journalist and also to create advertisements available to the corporate sector. Moreover, it is increasingly important and cost-efficient to use more online materials and campaigns rather than offline and physical promotion materials and campaigns. Though, offline promotion cannot be eluded.
Specific actions
Press trips

Media database (gathering information on international travel writers and journalists)


Resource library including photos, brand imagery, video clips of local attractions, photo CD
Press clipping

Targeting on specialized press and journals to place effective advertising
Newsletter to international travel writers and journalists

Strategy for celebrities, key opinion leaders or travel
bloggers (strong influencers)




Travel bloggers










Target and segmented publicity




Effective online press room





Strategic methodology
• The path to programmatic begins with the choice of your demand-side-platform (DSP). good DSP must be transparent in their capabilities and data sources
• A data partner should be able to clearly articulate the value of their data and how it will assist you in targeting your campaign to achieve your KPIs
• Upon setting the KPIs for any individual campaign, you should then work backwards from your goals to see which measurements align
• Programmatic is all about delivering the right message to the right audience at the right time. Creativity is capital
• The programmatic opportunity can only be fully exploited if there is a strong post-campaign reporting and analytics system

Example






Goa’s Marketing superstructure – Press, Publicity & Programmatic Marketing



Types of collaterals
• Sales brochures and other printed product information

• Visual aids used in sales presentations

• Web content (photos, 360º views, video)

• Sales scripts

• Demonstration scripts

• Product data sheets

• Product white papers

• promotional pictures




Kerala’s collaterals in website and social media




How to measure success in social media Some inspiration facts

Number of visitors viewing user-generated content (UGC) on the website
Number of visitors viewing UGC on third party sites Number of identified blogs that support the destination Blog activity
Tags / Hashtags
Volume of tags that include optimization engines keywords with presence in websites from priority markets

Specific statistics, such as “Trending topic” or number of “retweet”

Kerala is the destination that spends more effort on social media means. However Goa is already performing well in this field


Sri Lanka

Bali

Ibiza

Kerala

Maldives

Mauritius

Thailand

Goa





6.033

903

23.420

NA

38.235

39.146

615.468







1.149

11.200

14.700

70.300

12.600

15.400

70.400

30.200







59.300

4.000

13.900

57.900

42.400

NA 52.700

20.300





529 NA





52 18.440 NA





NA 2.045





618


Marketing G0A Destination – B2B, Events & Congresses



Objectives B2B stakeholders

• Definition of office/representation model: according to budget and market priorities, the first step is to define the kind of office model among the following options: BTB satellite offices, Tourism Trade Representative, Destination Marketing or PR Company
• Selection of source markets for offices: identification of priority markets and specific locations (cities), where to settle the defined marketing office
• Assessment and revision of network map every 4 years, in order to optimize efforts and resources, redefine the priorities and office models, according to trends, market’s changes and competitiveness situation


Marketing G0A Destination– Customer Intelligence (CI) & Campaigns



Objectives Customer journey map

Develop a customer relationship management in order
to save financial resources and enhance the loyal
visitors’ profitability rather than constantly targeting new visitors and new target markets

Manage the CRM via an IT system which would collect and organize the different data collected about loyal
customers

Manage the platform to distribute personalized information to customers such as newsletter, special
offers to instate a link with them and stimulate repeat business
The CRM system should monitor the use and enjoyment of the new products

Marketing G0A Destination –
integrating it all into a “Smart Tourism” Destination



Integration of different technologies into an omni – channel tourism destination

Smart Tourism Destination beneficiaries










Smart Tourism destination



Types of destination marketing and customization level - Key take-away




All means of mass commercialization and promotion not addressed to any specific public. No specific focus and broad market targeting. No limited timeframe


Specific positioning /selling messages containing a unique differentiation message related to one destination’s feature but addressed to a general public: for instance Kerala's campaign on backwaters tourism. Campaign with limited time frame until another campaign is launched


Specific positioning /selling messages focused on one type of product /main travel motivation and addressed to visitors responding to this interest profile. No limited timeframe


Omni-channel and personalized communication focused on target profile with specific contents catering for his/her preferences. Limited timeframe for each message, as communication is on-going and responsive to personal feedback

Building awareness among local stakeholders: A key success factor


Objectives Types of campaigns

• Definition of different campaigns per year: identification of awareness needs and key audiences to tap; definition of goals and strategies; definition of messages per target and communication tools for each one; definition of seasons and days for domestic tourism campaigns.
• Define the strategic partners per campaigns, such as public- private partnership with local tourism companies
• Define implementation schedule of each campaign

• Define the financial schemes and alternatives for funding

• Monitoring system for campaigns


Promotion & Communication - Key take-aways




Website

Use the web with the aim to build the brand, obtain awareness, attract new customers, transmit experiences and gather useful visitor information. Focused efforts are needed on new and updated content to align with new positioning and products




Mobile App

Key physical Contact Points
Press, Publicity
and Prog.
Mark Social media
B2B, events & Congress
Customer Intelligence & Campaigns
Smart Tourism Destination

Utilise advantages offered by Mobile App technologies like proximity marketing (partnerships), use of beacons, customized digital content or real time information. 85% of visitors use their smartphone when travelling
Place key physical contact points in strategic areas (airport, port, famous attractions…) in order to guide, inform, educate and improve visitor experience

Change advertising / publicity strategy into a cost – effective, targeted and experiential advertising plan

Goa’s social media performance needs to be continued. Focus on quality of materials (video sharing, photos), interaction with visitors and gathering information about them

Define and establish a consistent plan for all intermediaries, from OTAs to specialized agencies.

Goa needs to know more about its visitors and launch campaigns in order to increase revenue (repetition, upgrade, cross selling), improve experience and increase loyalty including visitors’ proactive recommendation
to other potential tourists All the above tools should be integrated with each other and share valuable information and bring the visitor a modern omni – channel destination marketing that give quality experiences





Best practices in marketing & promotion for international tourism






Best practices combine traditional approach and new ways





To generate direct business (tour operators, VIP travel agents, meetings organizers, other intermediaries) and also to indirectly promote the destination through tourism influencers (Indian and foreign celebrities, travel bloggers, etc.) know our destination so that it can then advertise and
market












Social Media

The goal is to use social media as a meeting point between Goans, to share their knowledge and become prescribers of destination, and at the same time, it is the platform for travelers to explain their experiences lived during their trip to and stay in Goa




Partnership

Agreements with local and/or foreign enterprises to promote and commercialize Goa’s product offer together. The selection of those partners need to follow an accurate process and need to share basic principles and values in line Goa’s tourism vison and mission

Goa should selectively attend the most important fairs & exhibitions in the main target markets with the lowest possible investment

Description Target

Most important Exhibitions & Fairs by target country Fairs specialized in particular products


UK: World Travel Market (London)


Germany: ITB (Berlin)


France: IFTM – TOP RESA (Paris)


Russia: MITT (Moscow)


Middle East: Arabian Travel Market (Dubai)

Making a good choice of influencer individuals can be decisive in Goa promotion and communication strategy

Description Target



It is capital to propose continuous training to Goan tourism professionals in order to build a strong offering and individual businesses’ promotion skills

Description Target

Types of workshops


Presentations include all merchandising materials to promote the destination and share useful information

Description Target


In a future stage, GTDC could consider the opportunity of strengthening its presence and actions through a network of “offices” in key markets abroad

Description Target


Future: GTDC Network Offices

 Objective: The mission of the GTDC offices abroad is to publicize the range of tourism options available in Goa and to position the brand by lobbying in the markets they cover. Their other core function is to give direct support to Goan tourism enterprises in their promotion efforts. In addition, they identify and analyze the trends in demand in each market to ensure that the GTDC marketing strategies for the international markets are based on full and accurate information
 Services offered:
o Maintain fluid dialogue with agents in each market: tour
operators, companies, media, etc
o Conduct in-depth studies of each market in their particular sphere and to identify new products and offers
o Benefit from the technical assistance to the Goan tourism industry and support on marketing, promotion and information
o Access to market data

Types of offices




Social media is the most powerful tool to promote, communicate and obtain awareness for a destination

Description Target

Channels tips Best Practice: Kerala

Find up-to-date information, weekly recommendations, competitions, activities, discounts and promotional offers


People can take representative photos of Goa and post and share them with millions of users who have this app. It is the first social network for mobile photography

View and share a large volume of inspiring material on the various destinations in Goa, and also encourages interaction through the comments made by users

Cooperation and even “co-opetition” are powerful tools to promote and communicate Goa abroad

Description Target

Types of partnership Possible Partners


Air companies
Local and foreign companies with direct flights or charters

Celebrities Depending on the market, make a selection of celebrities that share our values to promote our destination
Other Indian States Cooperate with other states to promote circuits in India
and potentially share promotion costs abroad – “co- opetition means collaborating with competitors

Film making Many Bollywood films are being filmed in Goa. Good opportunity to promote the destination
Tourism Intermediaries Agencies, TTOO, OTAs, collaborative tourism (Airbnb for small individual tourism accommodation)
International Quality labels Certification companies focused on the specific products that Goa wants to enhance and promote





Marketing by products / markets: A new way forward




Target
1. Individual end user
2. Specialized Tour Operators (offering segmented experiences)
3. Associations & Clubs of members for a specific activity

Promotion tools
1. Sample itineraries
2. Social media
3. Influencers blogs & fam trips
4. Advertising in specialized websites for each activity
5. Attend specialized trade fairs and congress









Horse riding Trips Cuisine Holidays Golfing Holidays








Rail Holidays Cultural & Art Holidays Painting Holidays


Photography trip Bird watching trip Cycling holidays


Marketing by products / markets: Creating Marketing Clubs










Tourism Product Club Development & Promotion
The following process proposed is adapted to obtain dynamic and attractive clubs to customers and companies. This project aims to create marketable and successful product clubs following the process below:
• Coordination of the initiative by a designated product manager
• Use of market studies to define adapted clubs to the industry and identification of club concepts with specific market needs
• Identification of company prerequisites to join a club – The club must welcome tourism companies and organizations with a minimum of quality requirement
• Identification of the activities and benefits of the club to members
• Selection of the different promotion channels for the club (brochure, roadshow, website, etc.)
• Management of the schemes and definition of roles
• Identification of the type of business to be represented and integrated to the clubs




Tourism product club development
The following process proposed is adapted to obtain dynamic and attractive clubs to customers and companies. This project aims to create marketable and successful product clubs following the process below:
• Coordination of the initiative by the product manager of GTDC
• Use of market studies to define adapted clubs to the industry and identification of club concepts with specific market needs
• Identification of company prerequisites to join a club – The club must welcome tourism companies and organizations with a minimum of quality requirement
• Identification of the activities and benefits of the club to members
• Selection of the different promotion channels for the club (brochure, roadshow, website, etc.)
• Management of the schemes and definition of roles
• Identification of the type of business to be represented and integrated to the clubs


Benefits of joining a Cluster Examples



• Receive tailored marketing tools, reserved exclusively for members of each Cluster
• Have access to specific analysis and technical studies
concerning the different products
• Be referenced as a member of the Club in GTDC site and dedicated pages (certification)
• Share financial resources for a greater impact on markets. Each cluster has a promotion fund constructed with members and other stakeholders contributions
• Adapt and evolve the different products taking into account the different trends and consumption patterns
• Share experiences and expertise with other professionals
• Participate in promotional actions proposed for specific Clusters
• Benefit from working with new market approach












Logos and certification International Cluster
operations












Action Plans




Action Plan example: Promotion of Cultural Tourism in Germany

Actions
• Specific site for German visitors
• Partnership with German companies related to Cultural Activities
• Newsletter with cultural content
• SEO campaigns with google adwords
• Social media support (tweets, posts and links referencing Goan Culture)
• Design a 6 pages advertorial in the supplement Simskultur to insert in
different German magazines and journals: Der Spiegel, Focus, Arte Mag, Woman, Air Berlin, Der Standard







Who participates and how is it organized How is it financed


Example: France Cluster Action Plan






Marketing by products / clusters

Product club development manual


Budget – Benchmark


Benchmark (*)

Country / Region International Budget aprox.
($) Foreign Tourist arrivals Expenditure per arrival
India 26,250,000 7,600,000 3.45 $ / arrival
Mauritius 11,600,000 1,050,000 11.04 $ / arrival
Sri Lanka 5,600,000 1,800,000 3.1 $ / arrival
Dominican Rep. 62,000,000 4,000,000 15.5 $ / arrival
Ecuador 11,000,000 850,000 12.9 $ / arrival
Goa (current) 260,000 500,000 0.52 $ / arrival

(*) Marketing budget data currently unavailable for Kerala


Budget – Proposal - rational


Phases




Budget – Proposal – resulting investment patterns






Budget – Proposal – resulting total promotion spending












































Determination of policies & support schemes needed to implement the Master Plan


Master Plan Policies Application to:













Voluntary



Policies & support schemes for MP programs

Coastal








Regeneration/ Up gradation of beaches





Eco Beach resort







Fishermen Market and F&B Court

• Infrastructure development and enhancement policies for beaches: access, parking, urban design and equipment; beach promenade and access ; beach facilities
• Shacks location and relicensing. Special standards for beachfront shacks


• Designation / confirmation of protected areas and special development areas for tourism use
• Determination of potential tourism uses and density levels
• Similar but more stringent policy as for upgradation of beaches program

• None

• Blue flag standards and label (or similar)
• Shacks’ quality label – specialization label (Goan food)
• Beach management contracts: for access, parking , services, maintenance, cleanliness and security

• Sustainability standards vis a vis use of beaches and tourism development
• Blue Flag standards for beaches and sustainability certification for whole eco-beach development

• Fishermen Market & Food Court
standards
• Goan Culinary label



Policies and support schemes for MP programs


Coastal






High-end music venue paired with luxury lifestyle resort
High-end lifestyle beach club paired with luxury lifestyle resort



• None


• Minimum development guidelines
• Investment promotion and facilitation scheme to attract top international/ national investors and brands






Marinas

• Designation and definition of Marinas, as tourism attractions.


• Sustainability standards vis a vis location and development guidelines

Draft for discussion


Policies and support schemes for MP programs

Culture & Heritage







Fort & monuments






Villages and Old Goan Houses


• None specific beside cultural heritage
laws and regulations




• Designation and definition of Tourism Villages in tourism act, as tourism attractions.

• Minimum and complementary standards for facilities and services to be provided for tourism use
• Information technology tools for visit facilitation: wifi connection, self guiding mobile app (in addition to potential guided visits by professional)
• Minimum standards to apply for “Tourism Village” designation
• Special labels for some facilities within the designated Tourism Villages, such as Old Goan Houses, Handicraft or Goan Cuisine
• Determination of Goan food & drink products, as

• Designation and definition of
Culinary “Culinary Tourism” as part of
tourism attraction.

well as dishes
• Certification scheme / label for products, dishes and F&B outlets





Goa multimedia
Experience

• None • Identify and assign location and building, preferably in Panaji







Nature Clusters


• Designation and definition of “Nature Clusters” in tourism act, as tourism attractions.

• Ensure and develop minimum public infrastructure in the main attractions’ facilities forming part of the Nature Cluster: sign posting for circuit; road access, parking, toilets, permanent electricity, power, water, sewage and mobile and wifi connections
• Minimum and complementary standards for facilities

and services to be provided for tourism use, etc.
• Develop or improve public facilities in main entrance

Nature Sanctuaries • None


• Determination of suitable

point: sign posting and road access, parking, information center, toilets, permanent electricity, power, water, sewage and mobile and wifi connection
• Provide small ports/jetties for boats in strategic locations along the river circuits to facilitate access to and

Discovery River Cruises

rivers and circuits
• Designation and definition of “Discovery River Cruises” as part of tourism attraction

discovery of hinterland
• Provide certification label for boats / companies
dedicated to this product, based on minimum standards related to the boat characteristics and serviced provided



Master Plan Programs

Policies Support schemes

• Minimum standards for facilities and services to be

Adventure & sports tourism

• Designation and definition in Tourism Act of which activities form part of the “Adventure & Sports” Tourism category

provided for these activities in general and specific
requirements for each activity type
• Certification schemes for companies
• Training certification scheme for specialized guides / trainers






Agro tourism (spice farms and homestays and walks in agro farms)

• Designation and definition in Tourism Act of “Agro-tourism farms” and Agro-tourism Stays”

• Certification scheme and quality label for companies belonging to each type of agro-tourism - specialized label or spice farms.






Wellness destination
center

• Designation and definition in Tourism Act of “Slow Movement” Wellness and what is a “Wellness Destination Center”


• Certification scheme and quality label for companies
– defining standards that clearly differentiate a Destination Center” from the provision of wellness services only.






Family Entertainment District




Golf courses


• Designation and definition of “Large Mixed use entertainment District” in tourism act, as tourism attraction.

• Designation and definition of “Eco- friendly Golf Course Development” tourism act, as tourism facility.
• Give priority to development in the hinterland or, at least, not on the coast

• Minimum development guidelines
• Investment promotion and facilitation scheme to attract top international/national investors and brands


• Define development and golf course management guidelines with special emphasis on environmental sustainability




Waterfront promenade • Align policy with Taluka and local
municipality policies

• Provide guidelines to ensure tourism attractiveness of promenades to cater for both residents and tourists (especially domestic)







• Gaming cluster

• Relocation of offshore and nearby onshore gaming in more appropriate location, taking the opportunity to create an international standards gaming cluster

• Identification and allocation of adequate area
• Provide guidelines for the development of a state- of-the art gaming cluster, either offshore (with some services onshore); or onshore; or mixed (offshore and onshore)



Policies and support schemes for MP programs

MICE &
Weddings




Master Plan Programs Policies Support schemes



Mass events







Convention Centre

• Provide support to mass events that are sustaining and showcasing Goas’ new tourism positioning strategy, especially during the low and mid season



• Support the offer of large MICE events in the Sate of Goa by providing a state-of-the –art facility and the set up of
Convention Bureau

• Identify existing mass events that meet this criteria
• Support the creation of new events meeting this criteria
and that would take place during the low and mid season
• Provide guidelines for these events and facilitation services for their celebration (authorities’ approval, support public services, location)
• Public sector to be the main investors in this large facility
• Establishment of a Convention Bureau in partnership with the private sector, in order to promote and manage events in this facility and collaborate with the whole

tourism sector as providers
• Create special club/cluster
• Establish minimum quality standards for establishments

Weddings & Incentive
trips

• Align policy with Taluka and local municipality policies

to qualify for membership
• Promotion support scheme within products/ cluster marketing


Policies & support schemes for TRANSVERSAL programs

Master Plan Programs Policies Support schemes



Licensing / relicensing of specific sectors of activities and quality labels

• Minimum compulsory standards need to be applied to some key activities in Goa: sports & adventure tourism; tourism guides, taxis
• Voluntary application to quality labels to recognize businesses / attractions offering international standards

• Grace period for existing companies
• Soft loans or similar schemes for re- investment to upgrade / adapt buildings/ facilities/ services to new standards

• Awareness and training programs
• Grace period for existing companies

Reclassification and special labels for tourism accommodation

• Reclassification of tourism accommodation: changing A to D model to star-rating system (international standards)
• Voluntary application to special labels to recognize specialization of some properties


• Soft loans or similar schemes for re- investment to upgrade / adapt buildings/ facilities/ services to new standards

• Awareness and training programs



Tourism Intelligence System (TIS)


• Regulations to establish a comprehensive tourism statistics and Tourism Satellite Account System, able to measure tourism performance in a holistic, efficient and reliable way.

• Creation of TIS dedicated section within one existing
• Awareness campaign among tourism
enterprises for providing continuous

and reliable data

Scope of Work / Status

Planning Phase (Phase I) Modules Update
Module 1: Current and projected tourism scenario in Goa and
understanding key gaps Submitted and approved
Module 2: Tourism concepts to attract tourists to Goa Submitted and approved
Module 3: Development of Master Plan Interim Submission for Mod. 3
submitted and approved

Final report submitted for discussion
Module 4: Development of Tourism Policy


To be submitted
Module 5: Review and recommendations on strengthening
institutional and economic linkages
Module 6: Action plan






Draft for discussion






Thank you



This draft report has been submitted solely for discussion purposes with the Govt./ Committee constituted vide Order no. 7/5/WC-TMP/2014-DT/1745


© 2016 KPMG Advisory Services Pvt. Ltd. legal member firm name, a jurisdiction legal structure and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative, a Swiss entity. All rights reserved.



The KPMG name and logo are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International.

Uttarpradesh Tourism Policy

UP nahi dekha to India nahi dekha,..
Title Uttar Pradesh Tourism Policy 2018
Client Department of Tourism, Government of Uttar Pradesh
Knowledge
Partner Ernst & Young LLP 匪
Bulking Bbtttor woricfeigworid


Copyright •
No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form by photo, photoprint,
microfilm or any other means without the written permission of Government of Uttar Pradesh.


TABLE OF CONTENT
1. INTRODUCTION 6
2. UTTAR PRADESH TOURISM 10
3. VISION a MISSION 14
4. TARGETS 16
5. VALIDITY PERIOD 18
6. STRATEGY 20
7. TOURISM INITIATIVE 32
8. DIGITAL STRATEGY 36
9. DEFINITIONS 38
10. FISCAL INCENTIVES AND BENEFITS 42
11. INCENTIVES FOR HERITAGE PROPERTIES 52
12. GRANT/SANCTION OF INCENTIVES AND CONCESSIONS 56
13. LAND BANK 58
14. PROPOSED PROJECTS 59
15. BED & BREAKFAST SCHEME 60
16. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE TOURISM POLICY 65
17. INVESTOR FACILITATION 65
18. ANNEXURES 68


















































1. India's travel and tourism sector ranks 7th in the world, in terms of its total contribution to the country's Gross Domestic Product (GDP), generating INR 14.1 Trillion (Approximately USD 208.9 Billion), equivalent to 9.6% of India's GDP in 2016. It is forecasted to rise by 6.7% per annum to INR 28.5Trillion (Approximately USD 424.5 Billion), 10,0%of GDPin2027.
2. Additionally, the sector created 40.3 Million jobs in 2016, which ranks India 2nd in the world, in terms of total employment generated. The sector accounts for 9.3% of the country's total jobs. Ministry of Tourism, Government of India's Annual Report 2015-16 highlights the multiplier effect of investment in tourism, by stating that an investment of INR 10 Lakh creates 90 jobs in the tourism sector.
3. India’s travel and tourism sector was also the fastest growing amongst the G20 countries,growing by 8.5% in 2016, heralding faster upcoming growth in the sector and the country.
4. Money spent by foreign travellers in India only represents 12% of the total tourism revenues and totalled INR 1.5 Trillion (Approximately USD 22.8 Billion) in 2016. Statistics from the UN World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) shows that India received only 9 Million international arrivals in 2016, placing it at the 40th place in the world; a tenth of those received by top-ranking France.
5. Uttar Pradesh is the fourth largest state in India, with an approximate area of 2,40,928 Sq. Km. It is also the most populous state in the country, with a population of 199.5 Million (2011). Uttar Pradesh is one of the most favoured state for tourists in India, with a consistent ranking amongst the top states in terms of tourist arrivals.
6. In 2016, Uttar Pradesh was ranked the 2nd state in terms of the total tourist arrivals, 2nd in terms of the domestic tourist arrivals and 3rd in terms of the foreign tourist arrivals. The tourism industry in Uttar Pradesh has a significant contribution to the state's economic growth. The contribution of tourism to employment generation, both direct and indirect, is of immense importance to the state. 
7. The Government of Uttar Pradesh understands the importance of the tourism sector and has already identified tourism as a priority sector. In order to tap the infinite possibilities offered by the sector, strategic and organized Initiatives are needed to make the state a major tourist attraction. A tourism policy lays down a strategy to implement the vision of the Department of Tourism, Government of Uttar Pradesh, for a targeted growth of the sector. The state government envisions a new tourism policy, with a sharp focus on establishing Brand Uttar Pradesh as the most preferred tourist destination not only in the country, but also on the global map.
8. This policy will help Uttar Pradesh in creating a sustainable, pro-growth, and pro-poor ecosystem. The policy envisages a dynamic and long term approach to achieve the true growth potential of the tourism sector in the state. The policy proposes aggressive initiatives, attractive incentives and requisite regulatory reforms, that will help ensure large scale investment support, through efficient management and private participation. This policy will help Uttar Pradesh to establish a perfect synergy and a supporting strategy for establishing valuable partnerships between the public and the private sector and among various sectors for an improved environment necessary for achieving viable and tangible growth in the tourism sector.
9. The State Government grants the status of 'Industry' to all the activities of the tourism sector. With exception to the benefits for providing land, facilities applicable to the industries will also be available to the tourism sector.





UTTAR PRADESH TOURISM
A. About: Established in the year 1972, the Directorate of Tourism, is the developmental, promotional and regulatory arm of the Government of Uttar Pradesh.
B. Objectives: The role includes overall planning and execution of the central/state schemes for the development, up-gradation and improvement of the tourism infrastaicture in different parts of the state. To support the private sector, in the form of incentives for setting up various tourist facilities and promotion of various tourist destinations and products of the state.
2. Uttar Pradesh State Tourism Development Corporation (UPSTDC)
A. About: Uttar Pradesh State Tourism Development Corporation Ltd. (UPSTDC) was established in the year 1974, under the company's act 1956.
B. Objectives: The main objective of establishing UPSTDC is to provide tourist accommodation, restaurants, and wayside amenities to the tourists and to open recreational centres and organize package tours, ensuring promotion of tourism in the state, through vigorous publicity. It is currently operating 45 tourist bungalow/hotels and 13 UPTOURS divisions. PPP of UPSTDC properties for lease, sale or revenue sharing model, based on a transparent selection process.
3. World Bank Pro-Poor Project
A. About: The Uttar Pradesh Pro-Poor Tourism Development Project (the Project), funded by the World Bank, alms to unlock the potential of the unique heritage of Uttar Pradesh through pro¬poor tourism development for inclusive growth and poverty reduction in asset-rich but particularly low-income areas of the state.
B. Objectives: The Project aims at:
I. Increasing the benefits to the state's residents and its poor through the provision of jobs and public services to some of the poorest communities in the state living in heritage rich but poor areas; 
ii. Enhancing the management of the state's unique natural and cultural assets as endogenous sources of inclusive growth;
iii. Enabling the productive private investments and associated job creation opportunities, especially to the youth and women; and
iv. Use of skill development institutions, hotel management institutes for the training and placement of support services utilized for hospitality, hotels Btrestaurants like carpenters, electricians, plumbers, gardeners, painters, drivers, guides, etc., with the help of existing hospitality industry.
4. Brai Teerth Vikas Parishad
A. About: The Braj Teerth Vikas Parishad, earlier known as the Braj Planning and Development Board, was constituted under the Uttar Pradesh Braj Planning and Development Board Act 2015.
B. Objectives: The objective of the board is coordinating and monitoring the implementation of plans for evolving harmonious policies for integrated tourism development, heritage conservation and management in the region. It also gives advice and guidance to any department/local body/authority in the district of Mathura, with respect to any plan, project or development proposal, which effects or is likely to affect the heritage resources of the Braj region.




VISION a MISSION






3 VISION & MISSION
VISION
To establish Uttar Pradesh as a preferred tourism destination in India, and achieve country's highest tourist arrival and tourism receipts, driving employment generation and ensuring best visitor experience.
MISSION
To drive a sense of inclusive tourism development in the local community of Uttar Pradesh, and make optimum use of the tourism experiences across vibrant cities, attractions, nature, wildlife, adventure, food, handicraft (including the promotion of One District One Product Scheme), heritage, religion and culture of Uttar Pradesh.








































The Department of Tourism, through implementation of this tourism policy, aims to achieve the
following targets:
1. To become the most preferred tourist destination in the country by 2023.
2. To achieve an annual increase of 15% domestic tourist arrival and 10% foreign tourist arrival, consistently over the next five years.
3. To attract investments with a target of I NR 5,000 Crore per year.
4. To provide employment to approximately 5,00,000 people per year.
5. To impart training to 10,000 tourism service providers, over the next five years.
6. To convert 10 heritage buildings (Buildingswith heritage value) to heritage hotels peryear.
7. To attract 1,00,000 tourists to national parks and wildlife sanctuaries in Uttar Pradesh per year.
8. To improve regional connectivity of all religious and cultural attractions within the state, through road, rail and air.
9. To promote the state as a leading MICE destination in the country.
10. To elevate the standards of public service facilities across the state and provide high quality visitor experience.
11. To improve local entrepreneurship avenues, through execution of tourism events and festivals like Deepotsav, International Literature Festival, International Ramayana Conclave, Geeta Mahotsav,Ganga Mahotsav,Gorakhpur Mahotsav, Lucknow Mahotsav, Rangotsav Barsana,Taj Mahotsav, Shipotsav Noida, UP Divas and other city based mahotsavs.
To promote city-wise events and festivals with a predefined calendar, and promoting the same ndtionBlly 3nd i 门 tem3tion3lly 





This policy will remain in force for five (5) years, from the date of its issuance. Tourism units started/established/expanded operationally during such period will qualify for subsidy/benefits/exemption/waiver/concession under the provision of this policy.




K

STRATEGY
Uttar Pradesh has immense tourism attractions, experiences and services. This tourism policy is framed around the core theme of brand Uttar Pradesh Tourism, to augment the brand value and brand recall in the mind of visitors.
This policy will work on six guiding pillars, which have been identified to successfully achieve the policy mission and lay a comprehensive development framework for the long term development. These pillars include:
1. Strengthening tourism infrastructure.
2. Promoting investments and employment generation.
3. Augmenting brand Uttar Pradesh.
4. Focus on religious/spiritual tourism.
5. Promoting theme based tourism (Eco Tourism, Heritage Tourism, Cultural Tourism, Vedic Mini City Tourism, Agri Tourism, Crafts Handloom & Textile Tourism, Weekend Tourism, Adventure Tourism, Caravan Tourism, MICE Tourism, Wellness Tourism, Water & Cruise Tourism, Rural Tourism and Sports Tourism).
6. Sustainable tourism through community growth and up-gradation of local skills.


Tourism Infrastructure
Investments & Employment
Brand Uttar Pradesh
_ __ Theme Based Tourism
Sustainable
Tourism & Community Growth
These pillars form the basic composition of the policy framework to promote Brand Uttar Pradesh for tourism in India and overseas. The strategy to translate the vision statement and guiding pillars in reality will be derived from the following actions:
1. Strengthening Tourism Infrastructure
A. In order to overcome the shortage of tourism infrastructure like hotels, resorts, public utilities at tourist places, connectivity, parking, etc., the Department will encourage private sector participation through PPP mode to develop infrastructure and facilities at identified tourist places.
B. The Department will undertake the'IntegratedTourism & Infrastructure Development Roadmap’foi":
i. Garhmukteshwar, Ayodhya(lncluding 84-Kosi Parikrama);
ii. The Buddhist Circuit;
iii. Mathura District(lncluding 84-Kosi Parikrama, Vrindavan, Goverdhan, Barsana, Gokul, Nandgaon); and
iv. Bundelkhand, Naimisharanya(lncluding 84-Kosi Parikrama StMisrikh) Chltrakoot. 
C. The Department will establish a 40 room hotel in Badrinath and a 100 room hotel in Haridwar.
D. The Department will also undertake a feasibility study of mythologically significant sites like Hastinapur, Barnava & others In Uttar Pradesh, to construct permanent structures/ installations, as mark of identity to the era, the city is known for.
E. The Department will plan for integrated tourism development of the cities by Inviting planning and architecture colleges of the country, such as the National Institute of Design - Ahmedabad, CEPT University, School of Planning & Architecture, etc.
F. The tourism infrastructure will be upgraded in a planned manner at identified areas, coining under 5-10 KM radius of major tourist spots. Standard facilities for drinking water, toilets, parking, paved roads, rides, parks and street lighting will be provided, to enable quality visitor experience.
G. Using the World Bank's project of pro-poor tourism initiative as a pilot, the Department will develop and promote tourism, which will contributetowards the economic upliftment of the lesser privileged, through Inclusive development, planning of tourism assets and infrastructure, through execution of projects seeking Central Government, multilateral and bilateral funding.
H. Remote tourism destinations will be connected through the state of the art infrastructure.
I. Cooperation from the Central Government for strengthening of tourism infrastructure and addressing impediments in tourism sector (State will apply and benefit from the tourism centric schemes of the Central Government like Swadesh Darshan, PRASHAD, Hunar Se Rojgar, etc.).
J. The Department will coordinate with other departments to ensure effective maintenance of water supply, sewage system, approach roads and parking facilities at tourist destinations.
K. Connecting highways to airports withstreet lights and public convenience facilities.
2. Promoting Investments and Employment Generation
A. In consultation with relevant authorities, the Department will create land bank to facilitate creation of tourist spots and up-gradation of infrastructure.
B. The Department will facilitate creation of hotels, Bed and Breakfast establishments at various cities of religious/cultural importance.
C. CSR initiatives shall be promoted in the tourism sector.
3. Augmenting Brand Uttar Pradesh
A. The Department will link its marketing initiatives to the action items listed in the policy, in collaboration with both the public and the private sector.
B. The Department will adopt a top down approach to create Brand Uttar Pradesh as a leading tourist destination. A brand tagline and theme will be designed and marketed across all traditional & digital advertising platforms and at all tourist locations.
C. The Department, with the assistance of branding agency, will develop ad films on the local folk dance and other cultural offerings of the State. With the objective of spreading awareness about Uttar Pradesh's culture & heritage and also to revive the dying art of the state, the Department will disseminate these ad films across all advertising and media platforms. 
E. The Department will prioritize and pre-plan its content calendar for each of the social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, etc., to share information about the destination and its tourism attractions.
F. The Department will engage with the industry partners such as TAFI, IATO, TAAI, FHRAI, HRANI, UPHRA, online travel agents like Expedia, Make My Trip, Yatra, etc., and other non-travel partners to develop tailored packages and offer special tourism discounts.
4. Focus on Religious/Spiritual Tourism
A. Strengthening and up-gradation of civic amenities and facilities at religious tourist destinations across the state.
B. Establishment of shrine boards to effectively regulate and monitor pilgrimage facilitation and management.
C. The private sector will be encouraged to participate on PPP mode towards creation of accommodation facilities at religious destinations.
D. Creation of tourist facilitation centres to enhance the visitor experience at religious destinations. These centres will be set up in the next two years at Gorakhpur,Mathura, Vrindavan, Vindhyachal, Ayodhya, Naimisharanya, Varanasi, etc.
E. Integration of available Ashrams at various religious locations with the Department for providing alternate boarding/lodging options.
5. Promoting Theme Based Tourism
A. Eco Tourism
I. In coordination with the Uttar Pradesh Forest Corporation (UPFC), the Department will provide civic and tourist amenities in national parks and wildlife sanctuaries, to ensure visitor satisfaction.
ii. Nature Interpretation Centres, Nature Camps, Boating and Nature Tour Programs will be organized and managed at centralized level in Lucknow.
iii. Engagement of local communities to ensure equitable distribution of benefits and socio¬economic upliftment of the locals.
iv. Bird Sanctuaries at Nawabganj, Hastinapur, Sur Sarovar, Ranipur Sanctuary (Banda), Kaimoor Sanctuary (Mirzapur), Samaspur Sanctuary (Rae Bareli), Surha Taal Sanctuary (Ballia) and Patna Sanctuary (Etah) to be promoted.
v. Moll has been signed between UPFC and UPSTDC, to promote eco-tourism in the state.
B. Heritage Tourism
i. Recently recognized by UNESCO as the 'Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity', 'Kumbh' will be promoted extensively in the national and the international markets.
ii. All UNESCO world heritage sites will be promoted through dedicated marketing channels, including participation in summits, fairs, and roadshows in select countries. 
iii. The Department will work with architects and Archaeological Survey of India (ASI), to undertake restoration projects of sites at Kushinagar, Kapilvastu, Sarnath, Shravasti, Agra, Fatehpur Sikri, Barsana, Gokul, Nandgaon, Vrindavan, Goverdhan, Ayodhya, Kashi, Naimisharanya, Chitrakoot, Vindyachal, Devipatthan, Tulsi’pur and other underdeveloped potential tourist sites in the state.
C. Cultural Tourism
i. To promote culture exchanges, the Department will release annual calendar for all religious/cultural events and organize events with the objective to promote tourism and establish Uttar Pradesh as a brand.
ii. The Department will form a special task force with experts/consultants to organize cultural events, food festivals and other art based festivals.
D. Vedic Mini City Tourism
i. The Department will promote Vedic science practices within the tourist area as a theme.
E. Agri Tourism
i. The Department will setup a government interface to cater to the need of the agri-tour operators. This interface will coordinate and provide linkages with regional/local/concerned government bodies.
ii. The Department, with the help of local players of agri market and tour operators, will develop special tour packages for promoting agri tourism.
F. Craft, Handloom & Textile Tourism
i. To promote regional crafts industry of various districts, like Moradabad's craft, Bhadohi's carpet, Agra's inlay work and Zardoji, Varanasi's silk, Gorakhpur's terracotta, Nijamabad & Khurja's pottery and Lucknow's Chikan.
ii. Shilpgram and Shi Ip Bazaar will be established across the state to promote Uttar Pradesh's rich handicraft legacy.
iii. The Department will develop textile tourism circuits including Khadi to promote the indigenous art by linking it to major tourist destinations.
iv. The Department will organise thematic fairs and exhibitions to publicize the broad variety of handicrafts. Special visits to the handloom units will be integrated in the itineraries created by travel agents/tour operators.
G. Weekend Tourism
I. To encourage weekend tourism, the Department will upgrade tourist facilities for visitors to consider visiting nearby destinations from key locations. Proposed destinations include:
City ► Pilgrimage Historical Eco Tourism
Lucknow 1. Ayodhya
2. Kichocha Sharif
3. Dewa Sharif
4. Naimisharanya
5. Bithoor 1. Lucknow
2. Bithoor,
3. Gorakhpur
4. Faizabad 1. Kishanpur Wildlife Sanctuary
2. Dudhwa National Park
3. Nawabganj Wildlife Sanctuary
4. Katarnlaghat Wildlife Sanctuary
5. Suhelwa Wildlife Sanctuary
6. Samaspur Wildlife Sanctuary
7. Kukrail
Noida and Ghaziabad 1 • Mathura
2. Vrindavan
3. Garhmukteshwar
4. Barsana
5. Nandgaon
6. Govardhan
7. Shukratal
8. Shakumbhari Devi
9. Bateshwar 1 • Agra
2. Fatehpur Sikri
3. Sikandra
4. Bateshwar
5. Bah 1. Chambal National Park
2. Sur Sarovar Wildlife Sanctuary (Keetham)
3. Okhla Wildlife Sanctuary
4. Patna Wildlife Sanctuary
5. Hastinapur Wildlife Sanctuary
6. Amangarh Tiger Reserve
1. Sarnath
2. Jwala Devi Shaktipeeth
3. Vindyachal Vindyavasni 1. Ramnagar Fort
2. Mirzapur
3. Chadauli District (Vijaygarh Fort, Agori Fort, Singrauli Dura)
4. Bhitari 1. Chandraprabha Wildlife Sanctuary
2. Surha Taal Wildlife Sanctuary
3. Kaimur Wildlife Sanctuary
4. Hathinala Eco Point
5. Rajdari, Deodari
7. Chunadari, Mukhadari
8. Windom Lakhaniya Dari
9. Sirsi Fall
10. Rihand Dam
11 • Son View Point
12. Salkhan Fossil Park
Allahabad 1 • Sangam
2. Kadavasini
3. Shringverpur,
4. Goshitaram Math
5. Prabhas Giri
6. Kaushambi
7. Chitrakoot 1. Allahabad
2. Kada
3. Mirzapur 1. Samaspur Wildlife Sanctuary
2. Alwara Lake,
3. Ranipur Wildlife Sanctuary
4. Sabri Fall
Gorakhpur 1. Kushinagar
2. Ayodhya
3. Varanasi
4. Chapia
5. Devipatan
6. Goraksha Peeth 1. Faizabad
2. Balrampur 1. Bakhira Sanctuary
(Sant Kabir Nagar District)
2. Sohagi Barwa Sanctuary
3. Suhelwa Wildlife Sanctuary
4. Parvati Aranga Wildlife Sanctuary
5. Wetlands in Balrampur
Jhansi 1. Lalitpur (Buddhistcave)
2. Jain temple complex, Lalitpur 1. Dashawatar Temple
2. Forts in Bundelkhand
3. Nahar Ghati 1. Bhagwan Mahavir
Wildlife Sanctuary
2. Rajghat Dam
3. Mata TUa Dam
4. Vijay Sagar Wildlife Sanctuary
5. Baruah Sagar
6. Pahunj and Tal Behat


ii. Marketing support will be provided by the Department for industry partners promoting weekend destination.

H. Adventure Tourism
i. The Department will leverage multiple opportunities arising from the varied topography that Bundelkhand, Sonbhadra, Chitrakoot, Ramgarh Tal, etc. offers to tourists and create a unique proposition for various adventure sports like paragliding, zip-lining, etc.
ii. The Department will provide assistance in administering all adventure sports and related activities, such as registration, regulation, planning, promoting, training, monitoring and providing infrastructure.
iii. The Department will facilitate creation of training institutes and adventure sports academy.
I. Caravan Tourism
i. Owing to the immense natural beauty and historical significance of the Bundelkhand and Vindhya region, the Department and UPSTDC, in collaboration with private players, will identify sites and undertake projects to promote caravan parks.
J. MICE Tourism
i. Special mention of MICE hotels (More than 5,000 Sq. Ft. area) in social media and websites to promote the hotels.
ii. Initiatives to be jointly undertaken by the Department and industry players to promote Uttar Pradesh's business event offerings, conducting of market feasibility studies and bidding activities.
iii. The Department will engage and build corporate tie ups with the companies which organize such meetings that will further increase the earnings.
K. Wellness Tourism
i. The Department will identify specialized centres for AYUSH: Ayurveda, Yoga and Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy, and will collaborate with them for setting up their units in Uttar Pradesh.
ii. The Department will organize International Yoga Conclave and promote wellness centres to draw more traffic and position Uttar Pradesh as a wellness tourist destination.
L. Water & Cruise Tourism
i. The Department will have the authority to undertake tourism activities in the water bodies under the jurisdiction of the Development Authority, Jal Nigam and the state government.
ii. The Government of India has sanctioned a scheme allowing cruise boats to ply between Assi Ghat and Raj Ghat in Varanasi.
iii. The Department will plan special tour packages for cruise tourism, including house boats, motor boats and water sports activities on River Ganges, post the feasibility study. The probable cruise route would be Kanpur, Shringverpur, Kaushambi, Allahabad, Mirzapur to Varanasi.
M. Rural Tourism
i. Villages known for special form of handicrafts, music, dance or art will be identified and introduced to the urban and foreign tourists to encourage their stay in the state. This will enable tourists to experience special village cuisine, culture, art and lifestyle.
ii. Development of local infrastructure, market linkages (Both backward and forward integration) and academic centres, with the help of local community.
iii. Establishment of facilitation office to ease the single window clearances for rural tourism.
iv. Development of projects facilitating the promotion of local art, handicraft, cuisine, lifestyle, etc., of upto INR 50 Lakh.
N. Sports Tourism
i. Promotion of important sports facilities in the state such as the Budh International Circuit (BIC) in Greater Noida, Golf Course in Noida and Lucknow, Badminton Academy in Lucknow, International Cricket Stadium in Kanpur and International Cricket Stadium in Lucknow.
ii. Ravine Motor Sports will be established in different regions for further attracting sports tourism
iii. Department will promote traditional sports in Uttar Pradesh like Kushti, Kabaddi etc.
iv. Probable sites for sports tourism would beBundelkhand and Vindhya region.
6. Sustainable Tourism through Community Growth and Up-gradation of Local Skills
A. The government envisions development plans for the sector, which would ensure benefits
to the local community on economic, social and environmental fronts.
I. The development and management of tourism destinations will be done in such a manner that effective conservation of environment, natural resources, local traditions, culture and products is taken care of.
ii. To ensure community participation, effective strategy of IEC (Information, Education and Communication) will be used at the local level. State Level Tourism Development Councilwill play a crucial role in ensuring joint participation of all the departments and stakeholders.
iii. The planned initiatives will focus on generating employment opportunity, besides enabling households and Individuals to produce and supply products that are demanded by industry, for the local people to get maximum economic benefit out of tourism.
iv. Ensuring cleanliness drives under the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan.
v. Regular training courses will be planned to promote enrolment of new people to the tourism sector and skill up-gradation programmes for the tourism service providers will be undertaken at regular intervals.
2. Supporting Pillars
A. Premium Tourist Transport
i. The Department will establish 10 helipads, each with a value of upto INR 2 Crore in the state, to further improve the regional connectivity. All regulatory authority approvals will be taken prior to such establishment.
ii. Hop-on and Hop-off bus service will be introduced at Lucknow, Agra, Allahabad, Varanasi and Mathura.
iii. In consultation withthe Department of Civil Aviation, new air sectors will be identified to St from Agra, Lucknow and Varanasi, to new destinations within India and overseas, to facilitate the movement of inbound tourists. In addition, air transport will be developed from major air heads to major corners of tourist interest, via PPP development and up-gradation of air-strips, helipads, air taxis and leveraging Central and State schemes on regional connectivity
iv. All major tourist destinations will be connected through quality four lane highways and where needed, the existing 4 lanes will be upgraded to 6 lanes highway. The Department will actively pursue this with the Public Works Department (PWD), Uttar Pradesh Expressways Industrial Development Authority (UPEIDA) and Uttar Pradesh State Highways Authority (UPSHA).
v. The Department will create travel packages, aligned with the need of consumers, to major tourism destinations with the help of UPSTDC & the private sector. Hop-on and Hop-off bus services with value added services like exclusive photography tours will also be introduced at major tourist destinations. The Department will also facilitate deployment of luxury buses and other variations of buses on busy tourism routes.
vi. At present, only a few major tourist destinations are connected to the National Capital Region by superfast express trains. In co-ordination with the Indian Railways, efforts will be made to connect all major tourist destinations with the National Capital Region with high-speed rail services.
vii. Brand Uttar Pradesh Tourism will be promoted through strategic tie-ups with the Indian Railways and Airports (Government and Private), to instil the positioning of Uttar Pradesh as a progressive tourism destination through dissemination of tourism communication.
viii. State capital Lucknow will be connected to all the state capitals of India by road, rail and air.
B. Disinvestment of Tourism Properties
i. Land bank will be created by pooling of unutilized land of various departments including Revenue, Irrigation StNazul land. The Department will disinvest INR 100 Crore in 3 years. Such land parcels shall be given on long term lease through e-bidding process for 30 years. 15% of the accrued revenue shall be retained by the Uttar PradeshTourism Department/UPSTDC for making the scheme a success.
optimum utilization of its resources towards development of better commercial services for tourists, the Department will continue to disinvest its loss-making/closed or not-in-use tourism assets.
iii. Properties will be offered for disinvestment, through the e-tendering process. Potential Uttar Pradesh Tourism Department/UPSTDC properties available for disinvestment are listed in Annexure I.
iv. Properties to be operated on Lease and Development Agreement or Development and Management Contract through PPP after formulation of SPV.
C. I.T. Enabled Infrastructure
i. Free Wi-Fi connectivity will be made available at major tourist spots of the state. The Department will identify 10 tourist spots every year to be Wi-Fi enabled.
D. Development of Way Side Amenities
I. Modern wayside amenities will be developed, catering to tourists/travellers of all socio-economic categories on strategic/major highways, leading to tourist destinations.
ii. The Department will also plan to set handicrafts emporiums along the wayside amenities.






1 • Kumbh
The Department, to elevate the visitor experience during Kumbh, will:
A. Invite artists from across the country and organise a day-long festival, street-side performances, carnivals and other engagement activities.
B. Have the street-side infrastructure painted in graffiti to give the city of Allahabad a colourful look and feel.
C. Invite the High Commissioners/Ambassadors of all countries to experience the Kumbh first hand to further strengthen ties with all countries.
D. Organise presentations for the global communityto educate them about the scientific, socials: religious significance of Kumbh.
2. Tourism Police
A. The number of tourism police will be increased and will be deployed at all significant tourism spots in the first phase, which will include Allahabad, Varanasi, Mathura, Ayodhya and prominent tourism spots. Specialised police stations will be established at Varanasi,Ayodhya,Mathura and Allahabad on the lines of the tounsm police station at Agra. Such police stations shall provide specialised services for international and out of state tourists in conjunction with the Department.
B. Special emphasis will be given to the security of female tourists. To ensure the same, female staff will be added to the task force.
C. The local bodies and local population will also be consulted while expanding this task force. An induction and training programme for tourism police force will be designed and conducted by the Department.
D. The tourism police team will be provided with the necessary support to perform their duties.
3. Registration of Service Providers
A. The Department will prepare an 'Act' to provide a platform for ensuring regularization of hotels (Including all-star categorization), guest houses, resorts, tourist trade, travel agents, tour operators, adventure sports operator, guides and persons engaged in the business of tourism.
B. Registration of service providers/stakeholders under this 'Act' will be mandatory. The list of registered service providers will be displayed on Uttar Pradesh Tourism website and portals.
4. One Stop Trave丨 Portal Solution
A. The Department has launched a One Stop Travel Solution Portal for easy booking facility to tourists.
B. The portal will have provisions to book hotels, flights, train, cabs, buses, etc., all under one single umbrella. The portal will be available in eight languages i.e. German, French, Spanish, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, Hindi and English.
5. Tourism Festivals
A. Uttar Pradesh, with its strong and diverse culture is home to many events and festivals. To promote Uttar Pradesh as a preferred tourism destination, the Department will organize events and fairs at national and international level. The state organizes special festivals, listed below:
i • Ayodhya Deepotsav
ii. Rangotsav Barsana
iii. Dev Deepawall
iv. Lucknow Mahotsav
v. Gorakhpur Mahotsav
vi. Bundela Mahotsav
vii. Buddha Mahotsav
viii. Ayurveda Mahotsav
ix. Ganga Fair
x. Deva Mela
xi. KarthikPurnima
xii. Ramayana Mela
33 y
B. A wide marketing campaign will generate publicity and will help Uttar Pradesh draw much awaited media and consumer attention. Below is the list of events planned:
i. Balloon Festival
ii. Uttar Pradesh Travel Mart
iii. Travel Writers Conclave
iv. Taj Mahotsav
v. International Literature Festival
vi. International Ramayana Conclave
6. Excellence Awards
A. Best Cultural Destination in India Award for the year 2016-17 by Lonely Planet Magazine.
B. Best Mobile Application from theSkoch Group under Smart Governance Awards Category In 2015.
C. Awarded for 'Adapting to social media for the convenience and mobility of Tourist' by Digital Empowerment Foundation.
D. National Award the 'Most Film Friendly State' in the year 2015.

























1. Content Creation
A. The Department will engage a media agency to create new and unique content, which can appeal to the evolving travelling community i.e. millennial. The Department wilt develop new image bank and video assets of Uttar Pradesh Tourism, which can further be disseminated across various marketing channels.
B. The Department will develop creative content in form of ad films, videos, website content, textual literature, editorials, advertorials, etc., and will promote the creative assets through extensive media buy across all advertising channels.
2. Revival of Consumer Touch Points
A. The Department will revive the consumer touch points of Uttar Pradesh Tourism by sharing destination information about all lifestyle, cultural, religious, nature & wildlife and heritage elements.
Website - The Department will develop a consumer friendly, informational and visually appealing, engaging and transactional website for Uttar Pradesh Tourism, which will serve as one stop solution provider for visitors.
ii. Mobile Application - The Department will develop a user friendly mobile application, sharing necessary travel information and things to do in the state.
iii. Social Media - The Department will pre-plan a content calendar for each of the social media platform like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube etc., to share Uttar Pradesh' tourism attractions, hidden gems, local stories, etc. in an engaging manner.
Pradesh Tourism, for users to start contributing content about the state.
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1. Tourism Units : Tourism Unit means a legal entity under the relevant law, engaged or to be in providing any service related to travel and tourism. Following units would be considered as Tourism Units':
A. Hotel
B. Budget Hotel
C. Heritage Hotel
D. Resort
E. Sport Resort
F. Tented Accommodation
G. Tourism & Hospitality Training Institutes
H. Adventure Tourism Projects
I. Theme Parks
J. Convention Centres
K. River Cruise Tourism Unit
L. Wellness Tourism Unit
2. New Tourism Unit : A 'New Tourism Unit' means a Tourism Unit which is set up and which commences commercial operations during the operative period of this policy. 
Only one expansion project (Commencing commercial operations within the policy period) of an existing tourism unit will be eligible for assistance during the operative period of the policy.
4. Commercial Operations: Date of Commercial Operations of a Tourism Unit is the date on which the Tourism Unit is open to tourists on a commercial basis, after due testing, trial running and commissioning under the relevant government rules.
5. Eligible Tourism Unit: New Tourism Unit and Existing Tourism Unit Undergoing Expansion during the operative period of this policy would be considered as Eligible Tourism Units.
6. Tourism Service Provider : Any partnership firm or private limited company or public limited company or corporation, duly registered under the law and providing any service related to travel and tourism including Travel Agents, Transport Operators, Ticketing Agents, Tourist Guide, etc.
7. Hotel : A Hotel, including accommodation of minimum 50 lettable rooms and a minimum investment of INR10 Crore (Excluding the cost of land).
8. Budget Hotel: A Budget Hotel or a motel having accommodation of minimum 20 lettable rooms and a minimum investment of INR 2 Crore to a maximum investment of INR 10 Crore, which provides basic amenities at an affordable rate.
9. Heritage Hotel: A Heritage Hotel means a hotel run in a fort, a fortress, a palace, a haveli, a castle, hunting lodge or residences with heritage features, built prior to 1 January 1950 and approved by the Government of Uttar Pradesh, as per the guidelines of Ministry of Tourism, Government of India (Heritage Hotel/Heritage Grand/Heritage Classic).
10. Resort: A Resort will Include a minimum 30 rooms and a minimum investment of INR 10 Crore, with a minimum area of 2 Acre.The bathroom carpet area should admeasureatleast 3.5 Sq. Mt. It should have a restaurant/dining hall with a seating area of minimum 40 Sq. Mt. (Excluding the kitchen and storage). It should have, on its plot, a minimum open space (Unbuilt area) of 6000 Sq. Mt. It should have at least 4 of the following facilities:
A. Indoor games (Example: Table Tennis, Squash, Billiards, Bowling Alley, etc.) with a minimum built area of 25 Sq. Mt.
B. Conference Room (Minimum carpet area of 30 Sq. Mt.)
C. Swimming pool
D. Tennis or Badminton Court or Golf or other outdoor games area
E. A Health Club (Minimum built-up area of 20 Sq. Mt.)
F. A lounge (and measuring at least 35 Sq. Mt.)
11. Sports Resort : A Sports Resort with adventure related sports will be entitled for capital investment subsidy only on equipment.
12. Tented Accommodation : Tent facilities should have clear ground admeasuring at least 1000 Sq. Mt. It should have tented accommodation capacity for at least 20 persons. There should be a minimum of 10 tents. The gross carpet area of tents should admeasure at least 200 Sq. Mt. All the tents should have attached toilets. The tents should be put on a platform raised to a minimum of 2.5 feet above the ground. The tent site should have adequate security. The site should have eco¬friendly structures admeasuring at least 200 Sq. Mt. for such purposes as food, recrr relaxation and lockers. It should have adequate electricity, water supply, sewerage disposal and drainage facility. The tented accommodation should be permanent in nature.
13. Tourism & Hospitality Training Institute : The Institute must be offering tourism/hospitality courses that are recognized/certified by the regulatory authorities.
14. Theme Park : should be based on a single or series of themes having a plot measuring at least 10,000 Sq. Mt. (Approximately 2.5 Acres), with a minimum investment of INR2 Crore pertaining to the cost of equipment alone. It may have amusement rides, water slides, accommodation (At least 10 lettable rooms), restaurant, theatre, shopping area, activity area and theme areas. It is, however, not mandatory to have all these features.
15. Adventure Tourism Projects : Adventure Sports should have the requisite infrastructure, equipment and trained staff, along with appropriate safety-and-rescue set-up, that will provide tourists with an opportunity to undertake permissible adventure and such other activities like mountaineering, river rafting, etc. All requisite permissions from various competent authorities as also a comprehensive insurance cover will have to be obtained beforehand.
16. Convention Centre : A covered pillar-less, air conditioned hall, having minimum carpet area of 5000 Sq. Ft. space, that provides place for meetings, conventions/conferences and exhibitions, and can accommodate at least 500 persons at one point of time.
17. River Cruise Tourism Unit : Any Boat/Yacht with a minimum seating capacity for 4 persons, which is licensed by the Transport Department, Government of Uttar Pradesh and having capacity to operate in the lakes/rivers of the state for pay-and-use facilities. Boats/Yachts used by hotels to transport or entertain their guests and/or goods/raw materials will not be covered under this definition.
18. Wellness Tourism Unit: A unit engaged in developing (Ayurvedic, Yoga and Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy) wellness centres, with a minimum investment of INR 2 Crore.
19. Sound and Light Show/Laser Show: Minimum Investment in the equipment cost to the tune of INR 1 Crore.
Note:
• Hotels and other tourism units classified under the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India guidelines shall also be eligible for obtaining concessions and incentives under this policy.
• Other activities related to tourism, as notified by the Tourism Department of Central/State Government, from time to time, will also be eligible for obtaining concessions and incentives under this policy.










































\ 〇 FISCAL INCENTIVES & BENEFITS
To enhance the interest of private sector and boost the tourism sector at large from the notification of the policy, the State Government grants the status of 'Industry' to the tourism sector. With exception to the benefits for providing land, facilities applicable to the industnes will also be available to the tourism sector, as below:
1. Sanction of electricity load, on priority.
2. Taxes of local bodies including Nagar Nigam and Jal Sansthan as levied on the industries, to be applicable on the tourism units.
3. Hotel construction to be permitted in the industrial areas as per the policy decided by relevant industrial authority.
4. Rebate on the purchase of plants and machinery or equipment's coming under the tourism units/tourism industry.
Note : There is a ceiling of INR 1,000 Crore subsidy for 3 years by the Department of Tourism, Government of Uttar Pradesh. The sum of all incentives mentioned in this policy eligible to individual units will be capped at 30% of the Eligible Capital Investment made by the unit.
Tourism Circuits for Incentives
(Within 20 KM of all tourist sites, as per the notification from the
Department of Tourism, Government of Uttar Pradesh)
The total number of Tourism Units which would be entitled for Capital Investment Subsidy and Interest Subsidy each is also mentioned against all the locations.
Example: '10 units each' means that at a particular location, 10 units are eligible for Capital Investment Subsidy and 10 units are eligible for Interest Subsidy over the validity period of the policy i.e. 5years.
1. The Ramayana Circuit
A. Ayodhya -10 units each
B. Chitrakoot -10 units each
C. Shringverpur - 5 units each
2. The Krishna/Braj Circuit
A. Mathura -10 units each
B. Vrindavan -10 units each
C. Goverdhan -10 units each
D. Gokul - 5 units each
E. Barsana - 5 units each
F. Nandgaon - 5 units each
3. The Buddhist Circuit
A. Kapilvastu -10 units each
B. Sarnath -10 units each
C. Kushinagar -10 units each
D. Kaushambi -10 units each
E. Shravasti -10 units each
F. Sankisa - 5 units each
4. Wildlife 8t Eco Tourism Circuit (Within 20 KM of all Wildlife Sanctuaries and National Parks)
A. Dudhwa National Park -10 units each
B. Pillbhit Tiger Reserve -10 units each
C. Katarniaghat (Bahralch) -10 units each
D. Bakhira Sanctuary - 5 units each
E. Chandra Prabha Wildlife Sanctuary - 5 units each
F. Hastinapur Wildlife Sanctuary -10 units each 
H. Katarniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary -10 units each
I. Kishanpur Wildlife Sanctuary -10 units each
J. Lakh Bahosi Sanctuary -10 units each
K. Mahavlr Swami Sanctuary -10 units each
L. National Chambal Wildlife Sanctuary - 5 units each
M. Nawabganj Bird Sanctuary -10 units each
N. Parvati Arga Bird Sanctuary - 5 units each
O. Patna Bird Sanctuary - 5 units each
P. Ranipur Sanctuary-5 units each
Q. Saman Sanctuary - 5 units each
R. Samaspur Sanctuary - 5 units each
S. Sandi Bird Sanctuary - 5 units each
T. Sohagi Barwa Sanctuary - 5 units each
U. Suhelva Sanctuary - 5 units each
V. Suraha Tal Sanctuary - 5 units each
W. Vijai Sagar Sanctuary - 5 units each
Note : Construction of hotels shall be permitted only beyond the reserve area. All the laws pertaining to Forest and wildlife protection will be complied
5. The Bundelkhand Circuit
A. Charkhari (Mahoba) (Repeat) - 5 units each
B. Chitrakoot (Repeat) -10 units each
C. Kalinjar - 5 units each
D. Jhansi -10 units each
E. Deogarh -10 units each
F. Lalitpur (Repeat) -10 units each
6. The Mahabharata Circuit
A. Hastinapur - 5 units each
B. Kampllya (Farukkhabad) - 5 units each
C. Ahlchchhatra - 5 units each
D. Barnava (Baghpat) - 5 units each
E. Mathura (Repeat) -10 units each 
7. The ShaktiPeeth Circuit
A. Vindhyavasini Devi (Vindhyachal)-10 units each
B. Pateshwari Devi Devipatan (Balrampur) (Repeat) - 5 units each
C. Kadavaslni (Kaushambi) (Repeat) - 5 units each
D. Lalita Devi (Naimisharanya) -10 units each
E. Jwala Devi (Sonbhadra) (Repeat) -10 units each
F. Shakumbhari Devi (Saharanpur) - 5 units each
G. Shivani Devi (Chitrakoot) (Repeat) -10 units each
H. Katyayini Devi (Mathura) (Repeat) -10 units each
8. TheAadhyatmik Circuit
A. Gorakhpur -10 units each
B. Balrampur(Repeat) - 5 units each
C. Ghazipur (Hathiyaram, Bhudkura) - 5 units each
D. Goriya (Mathura) (Repeat) -10 units each
E. Sant Ravidas Sthal - 5 units each
9. The Sufi/Kabir Circuit
A. Jayas (Amethi) - 5 units each
B. Maghar (Sant Kabir Nagar) (R) - 5 units each
C. Salim Chishti Dargah (Fatehpur Si'kri) - 5 units each
D. Dewa Sharif (Barabanki) - 5 units each
10. The Jain Circuit
A. Deogarh (Repeat) - 5 units each
B. Hastinapur (Repeat) - 5 units each
C. Vahelna (Muzaffarnagar) (Repeat) - 5 units each
D. Baghpat (Repeat) - 5 units each
E. Bateshwar (Repeat) - 5 units each
F. Kampllya (Farrukhabad) (Repeat) - 5 units each
Note: A few locations fall under two or more tourism circuits. All such locations are marked as (Repeat) l'.e. repeated locations.Any tourism unit will be entitled to obtain subsidy only under one tourism circuit. 
Fiscal Incentives
1. Capital Investment Subsidy to Eligible Tourism Units
SI.
No. Eligible capital investment (excluding the cost of land) Minimum
project
expenditure
(capital
investment
inr, in
crore) Percentage of subsidy against fixed capital investment Maximum ceiling of subsidy (inr, in crore) Other conditions
1. Capital investment subsidy for establishing a new hotel 10-50 15% 7.5 ■
Above 50 15% 10
2. Capital investment subsidy for establishing a new budget hotel 2-10 15% 1.5 Locations where only
10 units are eligible.
2-10 20% 1.75 Locations where only 5 units are eligible.
3. Capital investment subsidy for establishing a new resort 10-50 15% 7.5 -
Above 50 15% 10
4. Capital investment subsidy for establishing a new sports resort 1 10% 1 Only on equipment cost.
5. Capital investment subsidy for establishing new tented accommodation 0.20 20% 0.50 Only on successful permanent installation (example: swiss cottage)
6. Capital investment subsidy for establishment of a new wellness centre 2-50 15% 7.5 ■
Above 50 15% 10
7. Capital investment subsidy for establishment of convention
Centre Up to 50 15% 7.5 ■
Above 50 15% 10
8. Capital investment subsidy for establishment of adventure tourism project, Cruise tourism unit, house boat 1 10% 1 Creation of infrastructure & installation of permanent
facility/acquisition of equipment.
9. Capital investment subsidy for the sound and light show/laser show (similar to kalakriti, agra) 1 25% 2.50 Investment in the equipment cost only.
10. Capital investment subsidy for establishing a theme park 2 10% 1 Creation of infrastructure along with installation of equipment.


A. Eligible Capital Investment : The term Eligible Capital Investment shall include expenditure components as per the guidelines of Ministry of Tourism, Government of India, for the relevant Tourism Unit. However, the following heads of investments with respect of the unit shall not be eligible for Incentives:
i. Working Capital;
ii. Pre-operative expenses and preliminary expenses;
iii. Second-hand plant and machinery purchased or shifted from within or outside country;
iv. Interest capitalized;
v. Consumable stores, inventories for maintenance or repairs;
vi. Investment on land required for setting up the Unit, inclusive of the cost of the land;
vii. Vehicles, furniture and fixtures, cutlery, crockery and utensils; and
viii. Any construction which is in the nature of real estate transactions, e.g., shops, flats, offices, etc. meant for sale/lease/rent.
2. Interest Subsidy to Eligible Tourism Units in the Tourism Circuits (Bank loan amount should not exceed INR 5 Crore)
@5% of the Loan Amount with maximum amount of INR 25 Lakh per annum for a period of five years for eligible tourism units.
Note:
• Tourism Units availing Interest Subsidy shall not be entitled to claim the Capital Investment Subsidy.
• Small hotels are encouraged to avail the Interest Subsidy.
3. Stamp Duty Exemption
Eligible Tourism Units will qualify for 100% exemption of Stamp Duty and Registration Fee on sale/lease/transfer of land for the first transaction only during the operative period of this Policy.
4. Conversion and Development Charges
Land use conversion and development charges shall be waived off for all new tourism units.
(Leasehold tourism units shall be allowed freehold as per the by-laws of the Development Authority)
5. Support for Sustainable Tourism for carrying out Energy Audit
A. Assistance will be extended to eligible tourism units up to 75% of the cost of carrying out Energy Audit by a recognized institution/consultant, Water Harvesting/Conservation and Environment-friendly practices like Green Buildings, Solar and other Renewable Energy measures, to a maximum token amount of INR 50,000 per unit. It shall be disbursed once during the operative period of the Policy. Subject to a maximum of two individual units per year post submission of certificate stating sustainability of the unit. Moreover such units 
B. Reimbursement of 20% of the capital cost of setting up effluent/sewerage treatment plant
subject to a maximum of INR 20 Lakh. Subject to a maximum of two projects in a year.
6. Incentive for Promotion of Innovation
The policy proposes promotion of technological innovation, by providing an incentive to:
A. Technology introduced for the first time in the state; or
B. Significant leveraging of Information technology; or
C. Technology products having negligible carbon footprint.
Project Cost Number of people directly employed Incentive Amount
Investment between INR 10-50 Crore 50 INR 10 Lakh
Investment between INR 1 -10 Crore 30 INR 5 Lakh


It will be a one-time Incentive, to be disbursed after the successful commissioning of the Project. Due recognition and publicity will be accorded by the State Government to innovative projects.
7. Support for Marketing and Promotion
All Tourism Service Providers operating in the state and registered with Department shall be eligible for this incentive. At the start of each financial year, the State Government will notify the name and number of such domestic and international events for which this incentive will be provided.
A. 50% of the space rent actually paid subject to a maximum of INR 30,000 per national event or INR 60,000 per international event.
B. The above incentive will be provided to two events in one financial year.
8. Skill Development
Short time skill development courses offered by various institutes shall be recognized by the Department of Tourism, along with the association of UPHRA, FHRAI,HRANI,TAAI,IATO and TAFI for employment generation.
A. Reimbursement of 100% of hospitality related course fees, for up to INR 10,000 per person per course, with the course duration of fortnight.
B. Training to tourist guides from local areas with a stipend of INR 5,000 registered with the Department. The reimbursement shall be limited to training for 100 service providers for three years.
C. Tourism courses would include courses for personnel working inhotels, resorts, restaurants, transportation booking, marketing, touristguide, ticketing and any other related course as notified by the StateGovernment from time to time. 
9. Incentives for ICT Enablement
A. The State Government will duly facilitate and support international and national level conferences, exhibitions and other events in Uttar Pradesh for the promotion of usage of ICT in the tourism sector. Financial assistance for conducting such conferences/events shall be provided to the maximum limit of INR 5 Lakh per event, as may be approved by the State Level Committee.
B. The Tourist Service Provider providing audio/video guide will be eligible for one-time assistance for up to the extent of 25% of the cost of procuring the equipment/content creation or INR 25 Lakh, whichever is less. Incentive can be availed only once by the operator during the operative period of the Policy. This incentive will be initially taken up for a few monuments only on a pilot basis.
10. Assistance for Research in the Tourism/Hospitality Industry
Financial assistance for up to the maximum limit of INR 10 Lakh will be provided to Recognized TravelAssociations/HotelAssociations/Chamber of Commerce/Other Travel & Hospitality Bodies to carry out market research studies on travel and tourism/hospitality sector in Uttar Pradesh. The subject matter would be finalized as per the relevance and requirements of the Industry. Not more than three such studies will be sanctioned each year. Preference to be given to direct hospitality association and institutes.
11. Employment Generation Subsidy
75% reimbursement (for male worker) & 100% reimbursement (for female workers) of EPF expenditure(Employer's contribution) for a period of 5 years for workers who are domicile of the State, to units employing more than 50 employees.
12. Special Incentive for Disabled
Payroll assistance of INR 500 per month per worker to units employing differently abled workers, subject to a maximum of five workers in a unit.
13. Support to Eco Tourism
100% reimbursement on achieving the certifications and standards from the Ecotourism Society of India, for up to an amount of INR 1 Lakh,subject to a maximum of two units per year.
14. Support for reviving the scarce Art, Music, Craft, Folk Dance and Cuisine of Uttar Pradesh
Subsidy of INR 5 Lakh will be granted to individual/group involved in reviving indigenous and scarce art, music, craft, folk dance and cuisine of Uttar Pradesh. For availing the incentive, the recommendation will be provided by the committee constituted under the chairmanship of the District Magistrate of the specific district.













































\ \ INCENTIVES FOR HERITAGE PROPERTIES
1. Definition : As per the definition of the Department of Tourism, Government of India, the heritage value old BuiLdings/Forts/Havelies/Kothis/Castles constructed prior to 1950, on being operated as hotels will be included in the category of heritage hotels. Heritage hotels can be of any size and dimension.
2. Criteria for the establishment of heritage hotel:
A. The conversion of buildings of heritage value into hotels in Uttar Pradesh will be valid as per the criteria laid down by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India.
B. The construction of the building of heritage value converted into heritage hotel should be prior to 1950.
C. The architectural features of any building of heritage value should be retained as far as possible. If need arises, any extension/improvement/renovation/change/maintenance in the building should be keeping with the original architectural features and in harmony with it.
D. The imminent surroundings of the hentage value building and especially, approaches to the heritage value properties should be in consonance with the architectural features of the heritage hotel.
E. The frontage of building, architectural style and general construction work should be completely indicative of local place's cultural specialties/traditions. The facilities available in the above hotel should be as clean as possible and of high class.
F. Heritage hotel should provide high class cuisine, food & beverage service and should give the flavour and taste of local traditions. The services available in hotel, facilities and immediate surroundings should be of high standard.
3. Classification of Heritage Hotel : As per the criteria laid down by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India, on the basis of antiquity of construction and facilities available in the buildings of heritage value, the hentage hotels have been classified into three main categories: 
B. Heritage Classic: Built prior to 1935, in which there should be a minimum of 15 rooms compulsorily.
C. Heritage Grand: Built prior to 1920, in which there should be a minimum of 25 rooms compulsorily.
4. Package of special concessions and incentives for heritage hotel:
Any place which has the potential of developing into a heritage tourism place or not, its examination, project proposal and regular monitoring will be done by The Districtlevel Committee constituted under the Chairmanship of the District Magistrate. However the approval for grant of subsidy will be through the State Level Committee (SLC).
A. Capital Investment Subsidy:
i. Amount equal to the capital funding of 25% of the capital cost of the project cost or INR1.5
Crore, whichever is less, will be given by the Government of Uttar Pradesh, under the capital investment subsidy for the construction/expansion of heritage hotels. 120% amount of the loan obtained by a promoter from a nationalized bank for any project of construction/extension of heritage hotel, will be considered as the project cost.
il. 25% of only that portion of this total project cost will be given by the state government as capital investment subsidy, expenditure of which is proposed to be under the capital head. The maximum limit of capital investment subsidy would be INR 1.5 Crore.
B. Interest Subsidy:
i. In the event of getting project appraisal from financial institutions licensed and approved by the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) and on taking loan from such institutions for construction of heritage hotels in the state, 5% interest subsidy would be given in favour of heritage hotel owner, for 5 years.
ii. The liability of interest subsidy would be permissible up to a maximum of 5 years period, from the date of approval of loan. The above interest subsidy would be permissible to a maximum of INR 5 Crore loan and admissible subsidy to a maximum of 25 Lakh, for 5 years.
Note: Heritage hotels are entitled to avail, both the Capital Investment Subsidy and the Interest Subsidy. Protected monuments will not be considered under this policy
C. Energy Benefit:
Heritage hotels can avail benefit under The Uttar Pradesh Solar Power Policy 2017'.
D. Exemption in Stamp Duty:
If for establishing a heritage hotel, any building and its appurtenant land is purchased, then on such transfer deeds, 100% of the payable stamp duty will be exempted in the form of subsidy by the Department, provided the owner of the building and its appurtenant land is the same person.
E. Land Use Conversion Charge:
If in any development area, where land-use is demarcated, and old properties of heritage value are converted into heritage hotel, then the concerned Development Authority would give 100% waiver in conversion charges, terming such land-use of the converted property as 'Heritage Hotel'.
F. Excise License Fee: 
G. Road Link Route:
The state government would give preference to the arrangement of better and encroachment free link roads to the heritage hotels. It will also be ascertained that the roads built by the Public Works Department (PWD) would be for public traffic and proposed roads should not be personal property.
H. Publicity Broadcasting:
The Department would do the publicity broadcasting of products and activities related to the heritage tourism, through mediums like the Department's tourism literature, website, etc.
I. Single Window:
i. A single-window will be adopted for heritage hotel and other tourist related projects and the Department would act as a nodal agency for help required for these projects from any government department, to facilitate ease in getting no-dues and approval for the tourism related projects.
ii. The Department would form a committee, which will tour from time to time to examine heritage units and will take action to address the difficulties before them and provide necessary cooperation.
5. Committees for Approvals of Heritage Hotels
A. Heritage zones will be earmarked and by-law will be prepared under the below mentioned Committee:
S. No. Designation / Department Title
1 Principal Secretary/Secretary Tourism Member
2. Principal Secretary/Secretary Urban Development Member
3. Principal Secretary/Secretary Housing Member
4. Principal Secretary/Secretary Culture Member
5. Director, Directorate of Archaeology Member
6. Director, Culture Member
7. Director, Museum Member
8. Chief Town Planner Member
9. Director General - Archaeological Survey of India , or a nominated representative Member
10. Director General - Tourism Member Secretary


B. To convert heritage building into heritage hotel, approval and classification from a two tier Committee will be mandatory. The committee constituted will be:
S. No. Designation / Department Title
1 District Magistrate Chairman
2. Sub District Magistrate Member
3. Executive Engineer,PWD Member
4. Manager, UPSTDC Member
5. Director,Directorate of Archaeology Member
6 ^ Regional Tourist Officer Member Secretary


GRANT/SANCTION OF
INCENTIVES AND CONCESSIONS
A o GRANT/SANCTION OF INCENTIVES ■ ^ AND CONCESSIONS
1. Pre-requisites for Grant of Incentives
A. Registration : The eligible tourism units who wish to apply for the incentives and concessions shall be required to register with the Department of Tourism, Government of Uttar Pradesh and obtain a registration certificate from the Director General, Tourism, in either of the following cases:
i. Before the start of construction of the unit;
ii. Before the start of operations of the unit;
iii. Within 6 months of the start of operations.
B. Subsidy on interest will be applicable for a maximum period of 5 years from the date of approval of loan.
C. It shall be mandatory to operate the beneficiary tourism units for the next three years.
D. If the tourism unit does not abide by these terms and conditions, then it will have to return the subsidy amount with a 15% simple interest to the state, otherwise it will be recovered as the land revenue.
E. The tourism units receiving incentives and concessions shall obtain No Objection Certificates (NOC), requisite approvals and adhere to the guidelines of the Department of Tounsm. Failure to comply with these provisions shall lead to the cancellation of all incentives and subsidies.
F. The tourism unitwill have to abide by the labour laws and minimum wages act as applicable.
G. All matters of dispute, interpretation, contention under this policy will be referred to the mittee constituted under the Chairmanship of the Infrastructure & Industrial Development
er (IIDC), C rernmes^of Uttar P iesh, w^se decision will be final and binding. 
2. State Level Committee (SLC) for Sanctioning Of Incentives
The State level Committee (SLC) for sanctioning of incentives shall be:
S. No. Designation / Department Title (SLC)
1. IIDC - Infrastructure & Industrial Deve lopment
Commissioner Chairman
2. Additional Chief Secretary /Principal Secretary,
Infrastructure and Industrial Development , or a
nominated Special Secretary Member
3. Additional Chief Secretary/ Principal Secretary, Finance, or a nominated Special Secretary Member
4. Additional Chief Secretary/ Principal Secretary, Culture, or a nominated Special Secretary Member
5. Additional Chief Secretary/Principal Secretary, Forest, or a nominated Special Secretary Member
6. Additional Chief Secretary/ Principal Secretary, Revenue, or a nominated Special Secretary Member
7. Additional Chief Secretary /Principal Secretary, Tourism, or a nominated Special Secretary Member Secretary


13 LAND BANK
1. In order to ensure prompt tourism development in the state through private sector participation, there is a need to create a land bank for Uttar Pradesh Tourism, to facilitate easy allotment of land to interested investors and developers.Land acquisition process would be carried out on a regular basis by identifying suitable locations to strengthen the land bank. Available land from various government departments, which is not in use will also be utilized for this purpose. The Department will form an SPV with the developers wherein, it will provide equity in the form of its available land bank.
2. Anempowered committee will be formed under the Chairmanship of the Chief Secretary - Government of Uttar Pradesh, for creation of such land bank. Following methods will be adopted to create land bank:
A. Allocation of Government Land - The government land of different departments (Irrigation and Revenue mainly) at potential locations, which is not under use, would be transferred to the Department. Municipal Bodies, Gram Panchayat, Industry Department and District Collectors would identify suitable land for the establishment of tourism units. Land so Identified will be set apart and reserved for tourism units.
B. Existing Tourism Properties of Uttar Pradesh Tourism Department/UPSTDC.
3. The maximum and minimum land areas to be reserved for tourism units will be as under:
S. No Category Minimum Land Area Maximum Land Area
1. Budget Hotels and 1 to 3 Star Hotels 1,200 Sq. Mt. Up to 5,000 Sq. Mt.
2. 4 Star Hotels 6,000 Sq. Mt. Up to 15,000 Sq. Mt.
3. 5 Star & above Hotels 18,000 Sq. Mt. Up to 50,000 Sq. Mt.
4. Other Tourism Units _ As per requirement and availability


4. Information of such land bank would be made available on the website of the concerned Local Body/District Collector/Revenue Department and on the Tourism Department's website.
Note: Refer to Annexure II for the Procedure for Disposal of the Government Land Allotted to the Department of Tourism through Auction
14 PROPOSED PROJECTS
The Department would undertake the projects through PPP (Public Private Partnership) mode.
1. Smart Ticketing System
A. Smart ticketing would form an ambitious project for the state government which will provide tourists, a seamless travel ticket to major tourist destinations, hotel stays, air and surface travel within the state.
B. Installation of smart ticketing system will provide a single card for easy facilitation of tourist related transactions across the state. Through this ticketing system, special discounts will be provided to the youth (Under 25 years) and senior citizens.
2. Sound and Light Show/Laser Show Project
A. The Department will start sound and light show/Laser Show at multiple tourist destinations across the state on the lines of Kalakriti, Agra.
B. Suggested locations are Gorakhpur, Hastinapur, Kapilvastu, Kushinagar, Shravasti, Varanasi Ghats, Allahabad, Lucknow, Agra, Faizabad, Ayodhya, Sarnath, Mathura, Kaushambi, Chitrakoot, Naimisharanyaand Kampilya/Sankisa.
3. City Centre Observatory
A. A Giant Ferris wheel, such as the London Eye, is a form of observation structure. It's developed on a concept of a city-cantered, ever-turning wheel offering a unique bird's-eye view of the entire city. London Eye is now the No. 1 paid for tourist attraction in London.
B. The Department will plan a similar project at one of the most significant tourist locations such as Lucknow, Varanasi or Allahabad on any of the river banks overlooking the city.
4. Digital Museum
A. The Department will develop a state of the art digital museums in Uttar Pradesh, most ahead in technological advances and use them to promote the culture, heritage and the dying art and craft of the state.
B. A world class digital museum based on Ramayana is already proposed in Ayodhya and Allahabad.
5. Ropeway Project
A. The Department will plan ropeway projects in Uttar Pradesh at feasible location near major tourist spots, and such project will be opened to private sector for investments. A project is proposed at Triveni Sangam Allahabad.
B. Probable sites for new ropeway project are Bundelkhand, Vindhya Region and Sonbhadra. 
"15 BED a BREAKFAST SCHEME
1. Introduction
A. The Indian tourism industry has emerged as one of the key drivers of growth among the services sector in India. It is a sun rise industry, an employment generator, a significant source of foreign exchange for the country and an economic activity that helps local and hosts communities. Uttar Pradesh, which is the 4th largest state in the country, is one of the most favoured tourism destinations, both in India and the world. In 2015, the state ranked 2nd and 3rd in terms of domestic and foreign tourists, respectively. Approximately 211.7 Million domestic and 3.1 Million foreign tourists visited the state in 2016.
B. Recently, UNESCO recognized 'Kumbh Mela' as India's 'Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity'. Kumbh Mela is considered as the world's largest congregation of religious pilgrims. Mahakumbh 2013 witnessed a total of 78.66 987 Million tourist arrivals in the state.
C. For the upcoming Allahabad Kumbh 2019, millions of tourist are expected to arrive in the state. To meet the growing demand of quality accommodation at affordable price, it is imperative to develop accommodation, in and around Allahabad, Ayodhya, The Buddhist Circuit and other surrounding places, within the state.
D. In view of this, the Department of Tourism, Government of Uttar Pradesh, through this scheme, will encourage Bed & Breakfast operators to develop more accommodations, ensuring visitor experience. The B&B scheme Is conceptualized under the Incredible India 'Atithi Devo Bhava', with the aim of providing comfortable homestay facilities with standardized world class services to the tourists.
Note:
• Bed & Breakfast scheme is applicable to Ashrams also. Detailed & specific instructions will be issued later by the Department of Tourism.
• The Department will invest INR 1.5 Crore in Ashrams to improve the lodging facilities.The Department would do the publicity of Ashrams.
• ReferAnnexure III for related forms and schedules.
2. Title Extension and Commencement
A. This scheme may be called Bed & Breakfast Scheme.
B. It shall be applicable in the entire State of Uttar Pradesh.
C. This scheme will come into force immediately.
D. This scheme is not applicable to Resort, Hotel,Motel and Guesthouse.
3. Conditions of Registration and Classification 
A. The residential premises are purely residential units and the owner is physically residing therein along with his or her family;
B. The owner shall let out not less than one room and not more than six rooms (Double Beds)to paying guests, consisting of twelve beds in all;
C. The bedroom has adequate numbers of bathrooms and adequate arrangement for water, power supply, proper ventilation, lighting, suitable furniture, sanitation and other facilities;
D. The premises are in a good state of maintenance and have the required standards of hygiene, cleanliness and safety, Including fire safety;
E. The premises should be located in an area easily accessible;
F. The premises should be good residential properties in good locations, where tourists can comfortably stay;
G. There should be a provision of parking facility at the premises;
H. The premises have been considered by a classification committee for registration as an establishment as Silver or Gold category; and
I. Any other condition which the Department, may impose, from time to time shall be applicable.
3. Registration Process
A. Under this scheme, the home owners intending to use their residential premises as a B&Bestablishment, for providing accommodation to tourists on payment for boarding and lodging, shall apply through'Form A' for the registration of the establishment and, through 'Form D' for the renewal, to the regional office.
B. On receipt of the application under Clause 1 above, the content of the application will be scrutinized. The presence of facilities and services will be evaluated against the enclosed checklist. The checklist will have to be duly filled and signed on all pages, and submitted along with the application. On satisfactory receipt of all the required documents, an inspection visit will be arranged by the classification committee.
C. The inspection team will submit their inspection report to the Directorate of Tourism. A letter confirming eligibility will be issued by the Director General - Tourism, to the B&B establishment owners, who qualify the screening stage. Only when the registration certificate has been received, may the B&B establishmentowners commence the business operations.
D. Police Verification Certificate of the B&B establishment is required and the certificate template is enclosed as’Form B_.
E. The Directorate of Tourism reserves the right to accept or reject any application.
F. Any person aggrieved with the recommendation of the classification committee may appeal before the Director General -Tourism, within thirty days and the decision of Director General -Tourism, shall be final.
5. Registration Fee 
Registration fee shall be paid in form of a banker's cheque or demand draft, issued by any scheduled bank,payable to 'Director General - Tourism, Government of Uttar Pradesh'.
6. Classification Committee
There shall be a classification committee constituted for recommending classification of the B&B establishment, as below:
District Magistrate/ Representative Chairman
Superintendent of Police/Representative Member
Vice Chairman, Development Authority/Representative Member
Representative of the Municipal Authority Member
Regional Tourist Officer Member Secretary


In the Noida and Greater Noida region, the CEO of the authority will be the chairman of the classification committee.The committee shall classify the B&B establishment under Silver or Gold category, depending upon the amenities available there in.
7. Category of Establishments
Basis the checklist given in 'Schedule A', the classification committee shall give its recommendation for the categorization of the B&B establishment as Silver or Gold.
8. Issuance of Certificate of Registration
Whenever any B&B establishment is approved by the Director General - Tourism for registration under this scheme, he shall issue a certificate as enclosed in 'Form C'. The certificate shall be issued for a period of two years in the first instance and shall be renewed thereafter, for every two years, on payment of fee laid down in this scheme.
9. Cancellation of Registration
A. It is compulsory for the registered properties to maintain the high standards set under the B&Bscheme. The registered properties can be subjected to surprise audits. The registration can be cancelled in case of poor maintenance or complaints from tourists regarding bad behavior.
B. If any criminal record is found against the owner of the property, the registration can be cancelled.
C. If it is found that the property owner Is not following the set rules and regulations, he/she would be given a chance for explanation. However, if the reasoning is not found to be sound, the Director General - Tourism can initiate the required procedure for cancellation of registration on the recommendations of the relevant Regional Tourist Officer.
D. If the property owner makes certain changes to the services provided under the B&Bscheme, the owner should inform the relevant Regional Tourist Officer regarding the same within 30 days, or the registration can be cancelled.
10. Rules for the Owner of the Property
A. The property owner will not install a reception desk in the B&B establishment. The B&B establishment should be maintained as a proper homestay.
property owner cannot run or provide any commercial services from the B&B 
premises, such as travel packages, travel agency, transport services, sale of handicrafts or any other commercial activity.
C. The property owner cannot provide any such services that might cause discomfort to the nearby residents/neighbours or lead to breach of their privacy or any other rights.
D. Publishing of fake information regarding the property.
E. No Involvement in any kind of brokerage.
F. Property owner needs to provide immediate Information to the local police station about the staying of tourists.
G. The property owner should maintain the register for proper records of the tourists.
11. Responsibility of Tourist
A. Tourists needs to fill full information in the register of the property owner.
B. No involvement in any kind of activities which will affect the administrative /social/ communal camaraderie. At the same time, behaviour should be best and must not hamper the residential activities of the property owner, as well as the neighbours.
C. No separate kitchen to be operated.
D. It is a responsibility of the tourists to pay for the damage caused to the property, whether intc门tio门3lly or unintentionally,
E. He must provide utmost help to the property owner in keeping the premises neat and clean.
12. Power to Inspect
A. Regional Tourist Officer, may, either himself/herself or by authorizing any officers or staff subordinate to him on this behalf, inspect, at all reasonable times, the premises of the establishment registered under this scheme. Any deficiencies pointed out by the Regional Tourist Officer, shall be rectified by the unit. If deficiencies are not rectified, the Regional Tourist Officer shall give notice to rectify deficiencies within 30 days from the date on which notice is received by the B&B establishment owner. If deficiencies are still are not rectified, the Director General - Tourism shall cancel the sanctioned registration and classification of the said unit.
B. The unit may file an appeal with the Director General - Tourism within 30 days from the date of order or letter of Regional Tourist Officer received by the unit.
13. Other Provisions
A. The B&B establishment shall have to necessarily display charges of room and the cost of dinner, lunch & breakfast. The type of breakfast to be offered will have to be specified, the charges will have to be displayed and the visitors will have to be informed in advance.
B. The registration will be finalized within 30 days of the recommendation received bythe Director General - Tourism, given that the application is complete in all respects.
14. Benefits under the Bed Et Breakfast Scheme
A. There will a single window for fast track and time bound approvals for the B&B establishments applying.
B. To encourage development of B&Bestablishment faster, the Department may appoint B&B aggregators to lead this Initiative.
C. B&Bestabllshment to remain under residential/non-commercial category.
D. Domestic rates for electricity would be charged to the registered B&B establishments.
E. Domestic rates for water tax would be charged to the registered B&B establishments.
F. B&B aggregators will be employed to train the B&B operators, by creating the SOPs and conducting safety and security audits.
G. Marketing support through listings on the Department's website, journals, publications, mobile application, etc.
H. The Department will support the B&B establishments by placing directional signage along the highways and major tourist spots.

\ 5 IMPLEMENTATION OF THE TOURISM POLICY
1. The State Level Tourism Development Council has been constituted as per the GO No. 623/41-2014-25 Sa/14, Dated 04-03-2014. This council will provide its recommendations regarding tourism related problems, activities, development works and will resolve local problems through mutual cooperation. The state-level and central-level issues will be sent for consideration to the state-level council. The Department will ensure the implementation of the recommendations of the State Level Tourism Development Council. For this purpose, the Department will set up a PMU to undertake effective monitoring of the activities and implementation of the policy.
2. Tourism Advisory Board: The government has proposed constitution of a 'Tourism Advisory Board', with top officials of key departments and leading names from the private sector as members to help take steps required to make Uttar Pradesh the most preferred tourism destination. All associations engaged in promotion of tourism in the state are suggested to be a part of the advisory board.
The Board will act as a Think Tank' and advice the government on policy matters relating to tourism promotion In the state. The Board can think of innovative and out-of-the-box ideas to make the state a tourism hub with world class facilities and recreations.
17 INVESTOR FACILITATION
The Directorate of Tourism shall function as the nodal agency for all actions under this policy. For Investment Promotion in Tourism, Directorate of Tourism shall work in coordination with Udyog Bandhu.

































18 ANNEXURES
Annexure I : UPSTDC Properties Indicative list of Uttar Pradesh State Tourism Development Corporation (UPSTDC) properties available for lease are:
S. No. Name of the Property District
1. Rahi Gokul Restaurant Mathura
2. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Barsana Mathura
3. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Gokul Gaon Mathura
4. Tourist Complex Nagla Chandrabhan Mathura
5. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Hargaon Sitapur
6. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Namisharanya Sitapur
7. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Sandi Jheel Hardoi
8. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Devkali Auraiya
9. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Kachhla Badaun
10. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Narora Bulandshahr
11. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Soron Etah
12. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Patna Panchhi Vihar Etah
13. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Bharthari Aligarh
14. Wayside amenities Kandhla Muzzafarnagar
15. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Khurja Bulandshahr
16. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Sardhana Meerut
17. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Sonauli Maharajganj
18. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Navgarh Siddharthnagar
19. Modern Reception Centre (Excluding the ground floor) Gorakhpur
20. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Bhupia Mau Pratapgarh
21. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Munshiganj Amethi
22. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Dewa Sharif Barabanki
23. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Shikohabad Firozabad
24. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Bateshwar Agra
25. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Sumer Singh Qulla Etawah
26. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Chunar Mirzapur
27. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Bhadohi Sant Ravidas Nagar
28. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Gopiganj Sant Ravidas Nagar
29. Rahi Yatri Niwas Bithoor Kanpur
30. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Sankisa Farrukhabad
31. Rahi Tourist Bunga low Khaga Fatehpur
32. Rahi Tourist Bungalow Deogarh Lalitpur



Annexure II : Procedure for Disposal of the Government Land Allotted to the Department of Tourism through Auction
Disposal of land/heritage assets situated in Nazul/Non Nazul/Rural area allotted to the Tourism Department for fulfilment of objectives mentioned in the tourism policy and for tourism development, shall be made through auction, however the revenue earned through the auction will be returned to the original/parent department from which the land parcel was procured, Directorate will be entitled to only 15% of the auction value earned. All auction will be passed through Cabinet. The procedure of procurement is listed below:
1. For fulfilment of objectives mentioned in the tourism policy in state, and for tourism development, competent authority shall allot and transfer free of cost government land/heritage assets to Tourism Department.
1.1. For disposal of such allotted and transferred land and heritage assets, Directorate of Tourism (that shall be called Directorate hereon), shall be the Process Manager. Directorate as a Process Manager shall perform activities such as selection of commercial consultants, preparation of detailed project report, inviting Expression of Interest, conduct of auction in transparent manner, etc.
1.2. Process Manager shall prepare documents such as Request for Proposal (RFP), Expression of Interest also as per need. Directorate shall discharge the above responsibilities in the following manner:
1.2.1.1. Directorate is authorised for identification, demarcation of transferred land/heritage properties to Tourism Department and to prepare requisite documents in this regard. The Directorate shall obtain desired information from the District Collector to prepare such documents.
1.2.1.2. After confirmation of ownership entry in revenue record for transferred land in favour of tourism department, Directorate shall prepare information regarding demarcation, land use, possession etc. and shall submit requisite report to tourism department for administrative approval for disposal of the land.
1.2.1.3. Directorate shall select commercial consultant as per the need and with the help of the Consultant Directorate shall prepare detailed Project Report, Tender document and conditions, Invitation for Expression of Interest etc. for development of tourism related activities/projects on the said land.
1.2.1.4. In documents prepared as above, if required Directorate can also recommend the activities which must be carried out by the successful bidder within a year from the date of getting possession of land. Required permissions, no objections etc. have tobe obtained by the Investor for implementation of the Project.
1.3. Reserve price, premium and Lease Rent:
1.3.1.1. Reserve price shall be calculated as INR 20 Lakh per hectare for areas within
the municipal limits and plan areas.
appurtenant land for disposal shall be decided by the Empowered Committee under the Chairmanship of Chief Secretary constituted under this Policy.
1.3.1.3. Excluding land referred to in clause 1.3.1.1, calculation of reserve price for land in remaining other places shall be INR10 Lakh per hectare.
1.3.1.4. Lease rent for said land shall be 1% annually of accepted premium for allotment.
1.3.1.5. Lease rent on land, between the date of execution of lease deed and first 31st March there on shall be payable as first annual lease rent. Subsequently, for coming financial year, from 1st April Lease rent shall be payable for full financial year
2. On obtaining permission from Tourism Department for the disposal of said land/heritage assets, Director General of the Directorate shall advertise notice inviting Expression of Interest/Tender. Time period for submission of proposal towards Expression of Interest/Tender shall be minimum 30 days. This process shall be carried out as given below:
2.1. Notice Inviting tender/Expression of Interest/auction of heritage properties shall be published as per need in State/National level newspaper by the Directorate. For the sake of wide publicity publication of notice may be repeated. With other reliable methods it shall be extensively publicized that land is to be offered through auction only. Notice should go in public domain through website of the Directorate too. Tender notice will be issued in prescribed format. DG - Directorate may make necessary changes as per need and suitability of project.
2.2. Scrutiny of Tenders/Proposals received:
2.2.1.1. Scrutiny of technical eligibility of proposals received under Expression of
Interest or Inviting tender shall be carried out by the Scrutiny Committee constituted as below:
Committee Members
Director General, Directorate of Tourism
Managing Director, Uttar Pradesh State Tourism Development Corporation
Joint Director, Directorate of Tourism
Finance Controller, Directorate of Tourism
Chartered Accountant of the UPSTDC
Commercial Consultant (if any)
2.2.1.2. After evaluating the technical bid, financial evaluation of eligible tenderers' financial bid shall be carried out by the Committee as constituted below:
Committee Members
Director General Tourism
Managing Director, Uttar Pradesh State Tourism Development Corporation
Finance Controller, Directorate of Tourism
Accounts Officer, Office of Tourism Commissioner
Chartered Accountant of the UPSTDC
Member
Member
Secretary
2.3. To scrutinize the proposals obtained on the basis of Expression of Interest (EOI), the Committee mentioned above shall determine the yardstick for pre-condition/ eligibility criterion, after having sought opinion of commercial consultant (if needed) specially appointed for this project. On the basis of such yardstick, proposal obtained againstExpression of Interest shall be scrutinized and calling of financial bid from among the eligible participants, shall be initiated. To eligible applicants after the scrutiny, request for proposal document shall be sent. Proposals shall be obtained from these eligible applicants under limited competition among them.
2.4. Financial proposals obtained through EOI or Invitation of open tender shall be analysed by the "Evaluation Committee" said above, and shall submit the financial proposal under consideration with their recommendation to administrative department for decision.
2.5. Tourism Department shall within 45 days from the receipt of the financial proposal of "Evaluation Committee", take the decision to approve or disapprove the financial proposal, and communicate to Directorate the decision. If the decision is not made within 45 days, highest bidder shall have the right to quit the tender and take back his earnest money.
2.6. After receiving the administrative approval for the financial proposal, earnest money of other bidders except the highest bidder shall be refunded immediately.
2.7. After getting the intimation about sanction of the proposal by the State, Directorate shall inform the successful bidder. Highest bidder shall have to deposit the payable amount after adjusting the earnest money within 90 days from the date of receipt of intimation. In case of non-payment within 90 days, an extension of 3 months with interest @ 12% may be given in the interest of justice.
2.8. If remaining amount is not deposited within stipulated time, a special permission for 1 month on justified reasons as a last chance may be given to deposit the amount. If the amount is not deposited in this extended time limit, allotment shall be cancelled with forfeiture of earnest money and land shall be re-auctioned. In such event, such bidder shall not be allowed to bid in re-auction as an individual, in partnership or in consortium.
2.9. For identified Government land/land on which assets are created and are transferred or would be transferred, final decision to lease out for 90/30 year or to develop through development agreement shall be taken by the department.
2.10. Tender amount and annual lease rent receivable against the leased land shall be retained separately by the Directorate in the head "Disposal of Government land and Infrastructure Development". Directorate may spend this money for survey of land, transfer, power / water supply, Road/ area planning, area development, security of assets and other infrastructural development as per guidelines issued by the Tourism Department.
executed which shall be registered under Indian Stamp Act at bidder's cost within 90 days. On submission of certified true copy of the deed, Directorate shall handover the possession of land to successful bidder.
2.13. State Government holds right to approve or disapprove any proposal without assigning any reason. In this regard decision of State Government shall be final and binding on all bidders.
2.14. Directorate shall specifically mention in Expression of Interest/tender document the period for completion of the project. Within a year from the date of possession, successful bidder has to start the work after obtaining mandatory required permissions / no objections. In case of non-completion of project in stipulated time, considering the effective steps taken and justified reason, an extension of one year may be granted for two times on submission of the application by the bidder. On non¬completion of work even after expiry of such extended time period, lease deed may cancelled along with forfeiture of all deposited amount and bank guarantee may be revoked.
2.15. To execute lease deed, Director General, Directorate of Tourism shall be authorized as representative of Tourism Department.
2.16. In general, tender earnest money shall be equivalent to 10% of the reserve price subject to maximum of Rs.20 lac. Director General is authorized to determine the earnest money in special cases.
2.17. For amendment in lease deed under prevailing policy, Empowered Committee
constituted under the Chairmanship of Chief Secretary is authorized.
Annexure III: Forms & Schedules related to the Bed & Breakfast Scheme FORMA
Application form for the registration of the Bed & Breakfast Establishment
Disposal of land/heritage assets situated in Nazul/Non Nazul/Rural area allotted to the Tourism Department for fulfilment of objectives mentioned in the tourism policy and for tourism development, shall be made through auction, however the revenue earned through the auction will be returned to the original/parent department from which the land parcel was procured, Directorate will be entitled to only 15% of the auction value earned. All auction will be passed through Cabinet. The procedure of procurement is listed below:

FORMB
Police Verification
This is to certify that Mr/Ms/Mrs
son/wife/daughterof
residingat
since , and applying for the registration of Bed and Breakfast Establishment
under the 'Bed & Breakfast Scheme, bears a good reputation and there is no adverse remarks and entries made against him or her or any members of the family at this police station.
Signature
(Police inspector of the
concerned police station)
FORMC
Certificate of Registration Tit is certified that Bed & Breakfast Establishment (Name)
owned by Mr/Ms/Mrs is
registered for (Number) rooms for the Gold or Silver category under the Bed &
Breakfast Scheme.
This certificate is issued on and shall remain valid till
Director General - Tourism
Government of Uttar Pradesh

FORMD
Application for the renewal of the certificate of registration of the Bed Gt Breakfast Establishment
Date:
To,
Director General Department of Tourism Government of Uttar Pradesh Paryatan Bhawan, Gomti Nagar Lucknow
Sir,
I hereby apply for the renewal of the certificate of registration of Bed & Breakfast Establishment under the Bed & Breakfast Scheme. Details below:
1. Name of the B&B establishment, with complete address:
2. Date of registration (Enclose copy of certificate of registration):
As the period of validity of the registration certificate is expiring on , I
request that the said certificate may be renewed for a period of two years, per the term and conditions laid down under the Bed & Breakfast Scheme. [Checklist of the approved existing accommodation and facilitation is enclosed as per schedule of the said scheme].
Enclose herewith the banker's cheque or demand draft number dated
For INR payable to Director General - Tourism, Government of Uttar
Pradesh, as the renewal fee.
Signature
(Owner of the B&B Establishment)
FORMAT FOR UNDERTAKING
Date:
To,
Director General Department of Tourism Government of Uttar Pradesh Paryatan Bhawan, Gomti Nagar Lucknow
I have read and understood all the terms and conditions mentioned in the Bed & Breakfast Scheme, with respect to the approval and registration or renewal of the Bed & Breakfast Establishment, and hereby agree to abide by me. The information and documents provided are correct and authentic to the best of my knowledge.
Name and signature of the B&B Establishment owner
Place:

SCHEDULE A
Checklist for the approval of registration or renewal of the Bed 8t Breakfast Establishment
S. No. Subject / Facility Silver
Category Gold
Category Certification by the B&B Establishment regarding the facilities (Yes / No) Observation of the
classification
committee
1. Well maintained and well equipped house with quality carpets/area/rugs/tiles or marble flooring, furniture, fitting, etc. in keeping with traditional life style D M
2. Sufficient parking with adequate road width D M
3. Guest Rooms:
Minimum one lettable room and maximum
6 rooms (12 bed). All rooms should be clean, airy, pest free, without dampness & with outside window or ventilation M M
4. Minimum floor area Sq. Ft. for each room 60 120
5. Comfortable bed with good quality linen & bedding preferably of Indian design M M
6. Attached private bathrooms with every rooms along with toiletries D M
7, Minimum size of each bathroom in Sq. ft. 20 40
8. W.C. toilet to have a seat Gt Lid and toilet paper D M
9. 24 hours running hot water & cold water with proper sewerage connections D M
10. Water saving taps and showers D D
11. Well maintained smoke free, dean, hygienic, pest free kitchen D M
12. Dining area D M
13. Good quality cutlery and crockery M M
14. Air-conditioning and heating depending on the climatic conditions with room temperature - M
15. Iron with iron board, on request D M
16. Internet connection D M
17. 15 amp earthed power socket in the guest room M M
18. Telephone with extension facility in the room D M
19. Wardrobe with at least 4 clothes hangers in the guest room M
20. Shelves or drawers in the guest room D M
21. Complimentary aqua guard or RO or mineral water M M
22. Good quality chairs, working tables and other necessary furniture D M
23. Washing machines and drycleaners in the house with arrangement for laundry and dry cle2i门i门g services D M
24. Refrigerator in the room D M



S. No. Subject / Facility Silver
Category Gold
Category Certification by the B&B Establishment regarding the facilities (Yes / No) Observation of the
classification
committee
25. A lounge or seating arrangement in the lobby area D M
25. Heating and cooling to be provided in enclosed public area D M
27. Garbage disposal facilities as per the municipal laws M M
28. Acceptance of cash or banker’s cheque or demand draft M M
29. Name, address and telephone number of doctors (to be deployed) M M
30. Left luggage facilities M M
31. Assistance with luggage on request D M
32. Safe keeping facilities in the room D M
33. Smoke and heat detector in the establishment D D
34. Security guard facilities D M
35. Maintenance of register for guest check-in and checkout records, including passport details in case of foreign tourist/in case of application for renewal M M


*M - Mandatory *D- Desirable
Note: The grading in the various categories will depend on the quality of accommodation, facilities and services created or provided. The same can be relaxed as also by the committee based on the local requirements.
VERIFICATION
I son/wife/daughter of Mr/AAs/Mrs
do hereby verify that the information provided
above is true to the best of my knowledge and the documents are authentic.
(Signature of the B&B Establishment owner)
Place: Date:

REGIONAL TOURIST OFFICES
S.No Name of the Office Contact Number
1. Regional Tourist Office, 64, Taj Road, Agra 0562-2226431
2. Regional Tourist Office, Hotel llavart Rahi, 35, MG
Marg, Civil Lines, Allahabad 0532-2408873
3. Regional Tou rist Office , Saanskratik Sankul ,
Chau kagat, Varanasi 0542-2505033
4. Regional Tourist Office, Hotel Virangna, Jhansi 0510-2441267
5. Regional Tourist Office, Tourist Bungalow Campus, 2 Civil Lines, Bareilly 0581-2511858
6. Regional Tourist Office, Park Road, Civil Lines,
Gorakhpur 0551-2335450
7. Regional Tourist Office, C -13, Vipin Khand, Gomti Nagar, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh 0522-2304870
8. 25/51, Birhana Road, Kanpur -
9. Regional Tourist Office, 3rd Floor, D Building, M.D.A. Building, Meerut 0121-2656164
10. Regional Tourist Office, Tourist Bungalow Campus, Chitrakoot
11. Near Tourist Bungalow (Pathik Niwas), Kushinagar 05564-273045
12. Junction Station Road, Mathura 0565-2505351
13. Hotel Janhavi Campus, Mirzapur 05442-263494
14. Hotel Mrigadava Campus, Sarnath 0542-2595965
15. Tourist Bungalow Campus , Behind Bus S tation,
Siddharthnagar
16. Hotel Niranjana Campus-B, Sonouli 05522-238201

Uttrakhand Tourism Policy










Uttarakhand Tourism Policy 2018
3^RraEius, ^RJHSJ <41fcl







































Title
Uttarakhand Tourism Policy 2018
Client
Department of Tourism Government of Uttarakhand
Author
Strategic Government Advisory (SGA), YES BANK
Year
2018
Copyright
No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form by photo, photoprint, microfilm or any other means without the written permission of the Government of Uttarakhand.
Prepared by
YES/BANK
▼ 



















































I am happy to announce the release of Uttarakhand Tourism Policy 2018 by the Department of Tourism. Govemmeni of Uttarakhand.
Tourism is the mainstay of the economy of Unarakhand and is also a major source of employmcni generation. The Stale has an unparalleled diverse suite of offerings such as religious, adventure, wildlife, rural and wellness tourism amongst other. During 2006-07 to 2016-17. the sector accounled for over 50% of the State's GSDP. Tourism, therefore, has a
vital role in Utlarakhand's journey towards realizing ils socio-economic development goals.
The First Tourism Policy for the State was prepared in 2001 after the formation of ihe Slate. The new tourism policy, released 17 years after the first policy, is based on a comprehensive analysis of the opportunities & challenges in the sector and factors in the trends and developments in the global tourism landscape.
The policy accords Mndusiry' status lo tourism, opening up of plethora of incentives for investors in the sector. Small scale investments of upto INR 10 Cr. will benefit from incentives for MSME whereas large scale investmenis will benefit from Mega Industrial and Investment Policy. The policy will also lay down a roadmap for !hc Government's flagship *13 districts. 13 destinations' scheme for systematic development of ihe destinations. The policy has also been integrated with Uttarakhand Skill Development Mission and provisions for skilling & capacity building programs which will create livelihood and will incentivize ihe Tourism Industry if
they hire skilled manpower from local communities.
The new Tourism policy will be a key enabler lo create Ullarakhand as a global tourist destination that is safe, sustainable and inclusive by offcringworld class tourism products and services. 1 am confident that the policy will unleash true tourism potential of ihe State and position Ullarakhand as a leading tourist destination in India& the world. 
SATPAL MAHARAJ
Mi
lowign. Irrigalion. Miror lrrigal«n, Cubure, Wotenhed Monogemcnl. and Rci^iovs
Flood Control, Iain Wolcr Hormhng, Indio NepolUttorokHond Rivef ProfKh
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Uttarakhand is endowed with abundant natural beauty and resources, vibrant culture and rich heritage. Nestled in the lap of Himalayas, the State has nearly 70% of its area under forest cover which makes it an ideal destination for development of traditional as well as emerging avenues of tourism.
The State has a wide variety of attractions for tourists across all age groups and attracts domestic as well as international visitors.Tourist arrivals have grown at a healthy CAGR of 5% during 2006-16 which is expected to furtherincrease to 7% during 2017-28. Popularly known as Dcvbhoomi, the State is home to several deeply revered religious sites for followers of various faiths. The mountainous landscape provides enormous opportunities for adventure, religious, yoga & wellness, rural tourism, wildlife and ecotourism.
The policy focuses on development of new and innovative products such as blimps, caravans, hot air balloons/ homestays, ropeways & funicular amongst others to make Uttarakhand lucrative for both domestic as well as international tourists. It also lays down an emphasis on development of winter tourist destinations and alpine villages to make Uttarakhand an 'all season' destination. Further, adventure, wellness, MICE/ golf and film have been identified as niche tourism segments which will diversify the tourism offerings in the State.
I am pleased to apprise that the policy makes special provisions for attracting investment in infrastructure in the sector. The incentives framework has been packaged in a way that it will be beneficial to both small and large investors. The policy also calls for creation of land banks and appointment of nodal officers to expedite the investment through High Power Empowered Committee & Single Window Clearance System* Further, in line with the Government’s commitment to strengthen local and remote communities, special benefits have been provisioned for entrepreneurs in rural and far flung areas. This will curb migration in rural areas and also develop the State's rich rural & cultural heritage as a tourism offering.
I am confident that the policy will encourage investors to explore the massive potential of Tourism in Uttarakhand and become an enabler for creation of a robust Tourism ecosystem in the State. 
Tourism, Religious Affairs and Culture Department
Phone:0135-2714105 4, Subhash Road. Dehradun pa|e 05th Oct. 2018
Message
Uttiirakhnnd is known for its hospitality, nature, culture and peace. Presence of the Himalayas, diverse flora and fauna, several key religious sites and rich culture make the state a popular tourism destination. The sector has emerged as the backbone of Uttarakliand's economy and accounted for more than 50% of the Staleys GSDP during 2006-07 to 2016-17.
Due to such significant share in the state's economy and impact on livelihood generation and communily engagement, the sector assumes greater importance. It is thus crucial for the sector to be fully supported by a progressive polic\r framework.
I am pleased to share tliat the Uttarakhand Tourism Policy 2018 is an outcome of a meticulously crafted consultation plan involving stakeholders from across the lourism value chain, industry associations and trade chambers by means of discussions, representations, roadshows and forums, amongst others. The polic\r leverages on the inter-departmental synergies and encompasses elements from the skill development, AYUSH and niral development with tourism as Ihe focal point.
The policy is intended to capitalize on the enormous opportunities in the State by making il more investor friendly. Tlie ^>01^ enables investors to benefit from Capital interest subsidy, stamp duty concessions & much more. Further, it
lays special emphasis on development of emerging avenues of Tourism through offerings such as hot air balloons, ropeways, funiculars, golf etc. The policy wiU enhance the Ease of Doing Business in Tourism sector through creation of land banks, appointment of nodal officers, and setting up of High Power Empowered Commitlee and a Single Window Clearance System. Moreover, Ihe polic>, is closely integrated willi skilling of youth and regional communities through training gap analysis, planned approach for disaster management and a robust ICT infrastructure.
1 am confident that the policy will him out to be a key enabler for the next stage of
growth of the scclor and position Uttarakhand as the leading tourism destination for traditional as well as emerging avenues of tourism.










CONTENT
14
Preamble 15
1.2 Definitions 16
1.3 SWOT Analysis 16
1.4 Major Challenges of Uttarakhand Tourism 17
2. Vision & Objectives 18
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2.2 The Objectives of the Uttarakhand tourism policy 2018 18
2.3 Guiding Principles: The guiding Priciples of 19
the Uttarakhand Tourism Policy
3. Development Strategy
3.1 Development of Potential Land banks ....
3.2 Potential Tourism place
3.3 Identified Tourism Products / Themes ....
4. Product Development & Opportunities
4.1 Wellness & Health
Ecotourism and Wildlife Tourism
Adventure Tourism
Film Tourism
Golf Tourism
Service Apartments
Ho me stay
Health, Rejuvenation & Medical Tourism.
Discover your roots
Ropeways
Air Connectivity/Helipads
Public Private Partnership (PPP)
5. Institutional Framework 30
5.1 High Powered Empowered Committee (HPEC) 30
5.2 Ease of Doing Business and Single Window Clearance 32
5.3 Process Flow of Project approval by HPEC 33
5.4 Process Flow for Approval in Single Window Clearance System 34
6. Incentives / Subsidies 36
6.1 Incentives^ Subsidies under MSME Policy 2015 36
as amended in March 2016 & 2018
6.2 Incentives & Subsidies for larger tourism projects in 37
which investment extends rupes 10 crore under
Mega Industrial & Investment Policy - 2015
6.3 Eligible Entity under Tourism 38
6.4 Conditions for avail concessions and incentives 40
6.5 Other Conditions 40
42
42
4 3
Marketing & Branding 44
8.1 Marketing, Branding and Use of ICT 44
8.2 Com rn© n G6 m© nt 45 
Nepal and Tibet It is one of the fastest growing States in India, The state's GSDP increased at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 5.34% between FY 12-18.
More than 70% of the state is under forest cover, playing the critical role of green lung. The presence of almost all agro-climatic zones provides commercial opportunities for traditional as well as high value agriculture. Proximity to the national capital and abundant natural resources (including water and hydropower) have enabled the state to develop industrial parks in the plainer regions.
Tourism is unarguably one of the most important sectors to the state's economy. The tourism not only contributing for over 50% of the total GSDP from 2006-07 to 2016-171, but also providing livelihood across all parts of the state (including hinterland areas.) As the State moves on its vision to become a Green Economy, tourism sector will play an important role in realizing the State's socio-economic goals.
The number of tourists visiting Uttarakhand has consistently increased from around 19.45 million in 2006 to 31.78 million in 20162, and registered CAGR of 5.03%. A recent World Tourism & Travel Council (WTTC) report has pegged India as the 7th largest tourism economy globally in terms of absolute size, and further forecasts the sector to grow at 7% between 2017 and 2027, and the State Uttarakhand is expected to match this trend in terms of tourist arrivals.
Figure 1: Tourist Projections - Uttarakhand












1.2 Definitions
1.2.1 The definition of various expressions used in this policy are as follow
(a) Tourism means all types of tourism in modern parlance such as religious Tourism, Cultural Tourism, Pilgrimage Tourism, Adventure Tourism, Sports Tourism, Medical & Wellness Tourism, Heli tourism, Ecotourism, Film Tourism, Wildlife Tourism, etc.
(b) Infrastructure means power, water, and sewerage, transport infrastructure facilities established for individual or common use.
(c) Subsidy means Financial assistance granted by the Government of Uttarakhand or its Departments under various expense components for tourism.
(d) Concession means a financial relief or benefit or certain relaxation in procedure granted by Government of Uttarakhand or its Departments to Tourism related units upon fulfilment of certain conditions by them.
(e) The GST levied on the inter-State supply of goods or services by the State Government of Uttarakhand
(f) Money used towards ownership of fixed capital by Tourism Units
(g) Expansion means building the additional capacity by a tourism enterprise that is engaged in commerce Operations.
1.3 SWOT Analysis
Tablel: SWOT analysis of Tourism in Uttarakhand
Weakness 
Several Parts of Uttarakhand are known for being favourite destinations for retired people/pensioners to settle down; thus the potential of future market for luxurious second homes/holiday homes is here.
Cluster of higher education facilities in Dehradun offers opportunities for advanced environmental centre combining research, education and general conservation/ ecotourism awareness among students and visitors;
1.4 Major Challenges of Uttarakhand Tourism
1.4.1 Disaster Prone Areas - There are numerous instances where development is on disaster prone high risk zones.
1.4.2 Unplanned infrastructure development in and around Hill areas. Destinations like Mussoorie, Nainital, Ranikhet, Char Dham, Jim Corbett, Binsar etc. are over-crowded during peak tourist seasons and need urgent interventions like identification of permissible carrying capacities to enable sustainable planning, traffic and tourist management strategies.
1.4.3 Tourist Management during Char Dham Yatra.
1.4.4 Solid Waste Management at tourism destinations.
1.4.5 Inadequate railways and airways connectivity and expansion of airports.
1.4.6 Limited big ticket private investments (especially in star category hotels) 
To ensure necessary basic amenities at all tourist destinations like - parking, toilets, signages at strategic locations, ATMs, dispensaries, ticketing counters, internet and telecom facilities etc. 
j. To enhance ease of doing business (investor facilitation) by strengthening single window clearance process for faster approvals of tourism entities
k. To ensure the involvement of other State and Central Government Ministries/ Departments to leverage their strengths and schemes (eg. Swadesh Darshan, PRASAD, AMRUT, Swachh Bharat Mission, Wellness Centre under Ayushman Bharat Scheme, Start-Up India, Hunar Se Rozgar etc.) for improvement of tourism infrastructure in the state.
2.3 Guiding Principles: The guiding principles of the
Uttarakhand Tourism Policy are as follows:-
a. Aggressive Marketing and Branding of Uttarakhand Tourism by running campaigns, roadshows, appointing influential celebrity as State’s Tourism Brand Ambassador, radio jingles, social networking and other appropriate platforms.
b. To ascertain capacity building of tourism workforce and increase employment through skill development
c. To solicit participation and funding support from private sector, multilateral organisations and allied countries and donation from charitable agencies, individuals, Government Bonds, CSR, etc. in tourism infrastructure development.
d. Strengthening Tourism Trade Facilitation through single window clearance, appointing nodal officers, land banks and tourism investor’s meets/platforms.
Government of Uttarakhand has decided to develop ‘13 District 13
Destinations’. This important initiative is targeted towards holistic
development of the state and will take tourism to the last mile and far
flung yet beautiful districts of Uttarakhand.
3.1. Development of Potential Land banks
3.1.1 UTDB shall create a land banks for tourism purpose in every district, as the Uttarakhand Government has decided to develop one new tourism destination in each of the 13 districts.
3.1.2 State Government has formulated H Uttarakhand Tourism Land Pooling & Implementation Rules 2017” to enable faster and easier land identification and pooling procedures for tourism. This procedure shall also provide a suitable platform (to be developed on PPP mode) for new theme based criterion.
3.1.3 The State Government shall adopt a ‘Focused Intervention Approach’ to identify suitable land parcels in identified tourism themes.
3.2 Potential Tourism place.
3.2.1 Geographical Information System (GIS) shall be leveraged for mapping of different tourist destinations across the state, which will be a ready reckoner to investors (refer map for potential tourism destinations).
3.2.2 Department of Tourism shall conduct detailed resource mapping after every 2 years for all natural, cultural, heritage tourism sites and update the information on GIS based platforms.
3.2.3 Kiosks shall be placed at important and strategic places like Airport, Railway Stations, ISBT and in the premises of other key departments (viz. Dept, of Industries, AYUSH, Skill, Forest department etc.) for potential investors and tourists to impart information on potential tourism projects, land details, policies, approval processes, incentives and subsidies etc.
3.2.3 Tourism development will be a focus for lesser developed yet potential areas, so that employment opportunities are created and economic growth is ushered.












































Adventure i J ^ \ dt ^ - ^ f : i ^ ^ ? i1-|
Rafting-Shivpuri, Tons, Kali
Skiing- Auli, Dayara, KhaliyaTop
Trekking - Gangotri Kalindi khal - Badrinath, Devariyatal - Chandershila, Govindghat- Ghangariya - Valley of Flowers, Almora- Jageshwar- Binsar, Bedni Bugyal, Chopta, Pindari Glacier Trek, Milam Glacier Trek, Om Parvat- Aadi Kailash
etc.
Aero Sports: Helium & Hot Air Balloons/Blimps - Pithoragarh, Naukuchiyatal, Tehri, Bedni Bugyal, Chopta etc.
Mountain Biking- Nainital, Mussoorie, Almora etc.
Pilgrimage, Cultural & Festivals Gangotri, Yamunotri, Kedarnath, Badrinath, Rishikesh, Haridwar, Jageshwar, Ba'ynath, Piran Kaliyar, Hemkund
Sahib, Nanda Devi, Chota Kailash, Patal Bhuvaneshwar, Nanakmatta, Panch Prayag, Panch Kedar, Panch Badri,
Nanda RajjatYatra, Uttarayani Mela, Kumbh Mela, Ramman Festival etc.
Wildlife & Bird Sanctuaries Jim Corbett National Park, Rajaji National Park, Binsar
Wildlife Sanctuary, Kedarnath Musk Deer Sanctuary,
Nanda Devi National Park, Askot Musk Deer Sanctuary,
Neel Dhara Pakshi Vihar, Benog Wildlife Sanctuary, Govind Wildlife Sanctuary, Gangotri National Park, Kedarnath Sanctuary etc..
Nature and Landscape Mussoorie, Nainital, Chakrata, Dhanaulti, Almora, Kausani, Lansdowne, Mukteshwar, Ranikhet, Chaukauri, Pithoragarh, Khirsu etc.
Health,
Rejuvenation & Medical Rishikesh, Haridwar, Tapovan, Dehradun, Haldwani etc
EGO/ Rural Tourism Mana, Chopta, Chakrata, Deoriyatal, Pallyu, Shaukiyathal, Bageshwar, and Munsyari, Dodital, Dayara Bugyal, Kanatal, Sattal, Chaiinsheel, Mori etc.
Water sports, Cruise, Yachts Tehri Dam Reservoir, Nainital, Nanaksagar, Baur Jalashaya, Naukuchiyatal, Bhimtal, Sattal, Maneri etc.
MICE Dehradun, Nainital, Haridwar, Rishikesh
Buddhist Rock Edict Kalsi Dehradun, Govisairn (Kashipur)
Heritage Tourism Narendranagar (Tehri), Gujrugarhi (Pauri), Uppugarhi (Tehri), Pithoragarh Fort (Pithoragarh), Chandpurgarhi (Chamoli),
Vairat Kila (Chakrata), Katarmal Sun Temple (Almora), Devalgarh (Pauri), Nelong Valley (Uttarkashi) etc.








Uttarakhand
Theme-wise Major Destinations
MICE
Adventure
Pilgiimage, Cultural & Festivals Wildlife & Bird Sanctuaries Nature & Landscape Health, Rejuvenation & Spiritual Eco / Rural Tourism Water sports 
India 
Uttarakhand is extremely rich in natural and cultural heritage, religious destinations and festivals etc. UTDB shall prepare a Detailed Tourism Road Map by March 2019 having complete inventory of tourism resources - products/activities, destinations, potential for tourism development, status of the existing infrastructure, gaps, and tourism stakeholders along with action plan in phase wise manner.
The Department shall develop Tourism Zones' in strategic locations of the state to make vibrant tourism destinations. The Department shall create land banks for these tourism zones and special rules for faster approval processes, land use shall be formulated etc. This will enable the State Tourism to develop and implement target oriented phased development of regional destinations considering special tourism products and alternate tourism options.
Few of the identified tourism products after Stakeholders Consultations are discussed below:
4.1 Wellness & Health
Uttarakhand since ages is known for its therapeutic products. The state is well known for its varied species of famous medicinal plants and herbs. Over the decade, numerous private operators offering wellness and rejuvenation products have mushroomed especially in the Haridwar-Rishikesh belt. With the advent of wellness and rejuvenation products, this segment has further established a high demand thus it shall be promoted in other suitable regions of the state. Now towards further promoting the products of this category of tourism strengthening the segment and professionally running and maintaining the same, UTDB shall put concerted efforts as follows:-
The standard operation procedure (SOP) mentioned in the policy must be made after extensive consultation with the stakeholders so that they are fair and practical.
In order to check global standards, the quality and services for treatments and therapies shall be standardized and finalised as per national and international best practices.
iii. UTDB shall encourage NABH accredited wellness centres
operating in the state with a ‘Mark of Excellence^ The NABH accreditation for wellness centres has been pioneered by the Ministry of Tourism and Ministry of AYUSH. 
iv. UTDB and Department of AYUSH, Government of Uttarakhand shall jointly develop a high-value brand of accredited wellness and rejuvenation centres in the state with Private Sector Participation.
v. NABH certification and adherence to the provisions of National AYUSH Mission (NAM) is mandatory.
• The Department of AYUSH shall carry regular checks at these centers to ensure quality of services.
• UTDB and Department of AYUSH shall also promote these centres on their websites.
• UTDB shall ensure convergence of benefits for accredited wellness centres through schemes of Ministry of Tourism and Ministry of AYUSH.
4.2 Ecotourism and Wildlife Tourism
i. UTDB shall work in close co-ordination with the Ecotourism Board of Department of Forest and provide civic and tourist amenities in national parks and wildlife sanctuaries jointly along with Forest Department to ensure visitor satisfaction.
ii. Ecotourism activities shall be developed with the help of Forest Department so that the rich biodiversity of the state.
iii. Planning for such destinations will be done by engaging the local communities to ensure equitable distribution of benefits and socio-economic upliftment of the local population may propagate / disseminate.
iv. The model of Tripartite agreements between department of Tourism, Department of Forest and Communities (ETCs /EDCs) shall be explored to operate forest based ecotourism sites
v. Nature Interpretation Centres, Nature Camps, Bird watching, Nature Tour Programs etc. of international standards shall be organized.
vi. While encouraging wildlife tourism it shall be ensured that it does not disturb, deteriorate or have any negative impact on the environment.
vii. Ecotourism guides and naturalists shall be trained and certified in co-ordination with the Forest Department. 
4.3 Adventure Tourism
Private sector participation will be encouraged to develop adventure tourism activities in the state. These activities will include water sports, white water rafting, aero sports, paragliding, para sailing, hot air ballooning, mountain biking, trekking, mountaineering, rock climbing, bungee jumping, etc.
UTDB being a nodal agency shall prepare guidelines and rules for regulation and safety for adventure tourism activities in the state.
4.4 Film Tourism
i. Uttarakhand has been a hot-spot of film shooting locations where Nainital, Mussoorie, Ganga, Char Dham, Jim Corbett and Hilly Terrains of Kumaon & Garhwal are some famous places for shooting.
ii. The Department of Tourism shall facilitate production houses in faster approvals for filming sites, and thus strengthen symbiotic relationship between the production houses and the state.
iii. UTDB shall identify places of interest for film industry and make online catalogue of destinations and liaison with information department.
4.5 Golf Tourism
i. UTDB shall work in close coordination with Department of Sports and Indian Golf Union to identify potential investors, locations feasible for Golf & Mini Golf.
ii. A detailed resource mapping study understanding the market potential and saleability of the Golfing shall be undertaken.
4.6 Service Apartments
Service apartments are usually operated by caretakers hired by its owners to provide comfortable stays to visitors for short-term or long term stays. Utilizing vacant residential units can solve the issue of room shortages and simultaneously provide alternate and additional income to the owners. Department shall assist for registration and capacity building. Department shall formulate policy/guidelines for service apartments.
4.7 Homestay.
Homestay unit visitors get experience of rural life, culture and cuisine of host community. Homestay has resulted as a means of alternative livelihood this can also play a vital role for resolving shortage of rooms for tourist in various areas. Special emphasis shall be given on storytelling and handicrafts/souvenirs for which the youths would be encouraged to undergo trainings, as this will help them serve tourists better and earn extra income. 
Air Connectivity/Helipads
The Department shall develop helipads at prominent tourism destinations in coordination with Department of Civil Aviation with basic amenities like Toilets, Restroom and Kitchenette.
Public Private Partnership (PPP)
Non-profitable and closed units of Tourism Corporations will be given on lease to private sector for better and profitable operations of the units through competitive bidding on case to case basis.
Private sector participation shall be encouraged in the provisioning of tourist amenities, like wayside amenities, convention centre, ropeways, public conveniences, parking lots, wayside motels, shopping facilities, local transportation training centres etc.













































The Roles and Responsibilities of the HPEC
^ To prioritize, sanction and approve applied private sector tourism projects for availing state’s incentives and subsidies
^ To inspect, visit, review and monitor any projects regarding its implementation, execution, operation and management.
To recommend special legislation for formation of appropriate regulatory mechanism, robust grievance redressed mechanism as may be required for the project.
Floor Area Ratio (FAR) - The HPEC shall review, revise/modily the existing FAR applicable to tourism units and send recommendations to concerned Departments/Authorities for implementation.
Rame and issue guidelines for PPP initiatives in tourism sector.
Approve specific service levels for the Private Partner and ensure formulation of Service Level Agreement (SLA) between the Private Partner and UTDB.
Review progress of major projects/programmes undertaken and analyse the achievements with respect to the targets, both financial & physical and decide on corrective actions, if required.
Ensure appropriate auditing & monitoring standards are developed and maintained in order to ensure highest standards of transparency and accountability.
To constitute from time to time, any committees/sub-committees from various experts /members and/or staff and assign specific responsibilities.
Periodic feedback and suggestions from the stakeholders (such as representative of local community) tourism professionals (tour operators, hoteliers etc.) representatives from Government agencies, industry bodies, practitioners, academicians etc.
The HPEC shall meet at least 3 times in one year.
To support the objective of HPEC, UTDB will Create a dedicated Program Management Unit (PMU) for implementation of projects, which may include hired consultancy firm (Transaction Advisors, PMC, etc.) if required to improve the capacity and capability of the Department.




Availability of Land: List of land banks with area, infrastructure and distances is given on GIS based portal where GIS data is integrated with Google maps, and is available on SIIDCUL GIS System. The 'first-corne-first-serve, principle is followed for land allotment, and the procedure needs to be completed within 30 days of application. Also, E-Stamp facilily is now available at all the sub-registrar offices. Further, clear timelines have been provided for land use and land conversion.
Construction Permit Enablers: The Government has introduced Comprehensive Formal Building Bye Laws. An Automatic Building Plan Approval Management System has been established by the Government to facilitate quick processing, standardisation, effective monitoring and disposal of building plan permissions.
An online Registration form for Building Plan Approval is available on the SIDA’s online portal. The Government has fixed a deadline for the grant of Building Permit Approval (CTE) and Completion Certificate (CTO) issued by SIDA, i.e. 30 working days.
Environment Registration Enablers: A comprehensive list of procedures and 31/31 documents required for application are available on the UEPPCB’s website. The provision for an online Consolidated Consent and Authorisation form (CCA Application) for Water/Air Consent & Hazardous Waste Authorization has been made. Also, the calculation for the Consent Fee can be done through an online fee calculator. The Government has also fixed a timeline for approval/rejection of applications.
Single Window: The Single Window Clearance System (SWCS) viz. Udyog Mitra was formed as a consequence to The Uttarakhand












































d , 1

Picture
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]and Submission of CAFwith supporting documents
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Forward Investment PropossaLto Concerned Department
revert to Nodal Officer with comments
of Dept comments & submits to committee
Rejected with comments
NodaL Officer Issues order regarding in-prindpLe approval/rejection
灘J 
To attract tourism investment in the State the State Cabinet has accorded Industry Status’ to tourism and considered tourism as a mainstay of the state economy. Now, the investors can avail attractive incentives and subsidies akin to industry under MSME Policy-2015, where total project cost is upto INR 10 Cr. The department has also made separate provisions under Mega Industrial & Investment Policy - 2015 (As amended in 2018) for attracting larger tourism and allied projects, where project cost is above INR 10 Cr.
The details of available incentives and subsidies are as follows:
6.1 lncentives& Subsidies under MSME Policy 2015 as
amended in March 2016 & 2018 (up to capital investment of INR 10 Cr.)
To promote sustainable tourism development in less developed areas, the State has been divided into five categories (as per MSME Policy-2015 for the purpose of quantum of incentives/subsidies as under
Table 4: Categorization of Districts for Incentives/subsidies
Whole Districts of Pithoragrah, Uttarkashi, Chamoli, Champawat, Rudraprayag and Bageshwar.
^ Whole District of Almora.
^ All hilly development blocks of District Pauri Garhwal, Tehri Garhwal. (Excluding regions under category B+).
^ All hilly development blocks of District Nainital and Dehradun. (Excluding regions under category B+).
Dhalwala, Muni Ki Reti, Tapovan and adjoining plain regions of Fakot development block of District Tehri Garhwal.
Kotabagh development block of District Nainital.
Plain regions of Kalsi development block of District Dehradun.
Regions located above 650 mtrs from sea level in Raipur, Sahaspur, Vikasnagar and Doiwala development blocks of District Dehradun.
Ramnagar and Haldwani development blocks of District Nainital.
Whole Districts of Haridwarand Udham Singh Nagar
Remaining area of DistriGt Dehradun and Nainital (which are not included in category 'B , 'B+1 and 'C').
■ shall be notified separate// ty Department of MSME on the basis of recommendation c
^ Kotdwar, Sigaddi and adjoining plain regions of Dugadda development block of district Pauri Garhwal. 
Interest Subsidy on the interest of Bank Loan: 6 % (Maximum INR 5 Lakhs per year) shall be available to the eligible Women’s Entrepreneur / Service providing enterprises in the whole State.
Incentives & Subsidies for larger tourism projects in which investment extends Rupees 10 crores under Mega Industrial & Investment Policy - 2015
Department has made separate provisions to encourage larger tourism projects in the state by offering an array of incentives and subsidies. On the basis of Capital Investment Project shall be classified as large, Mega & Ultra Mega as follows: 1  
Housing department in order to promote tourism shall charge 10% of the circle rate towards the land use conversion for any land parcel for tourism and entertainment purpose
6.3 Eligible Entity under Tourism
In view of the potential of tourism in the state and lack of opportunity for traditionally defined enterprises / tourism unit, definition of enterprises / tourism unit to be expanded to include following tourism activities so that they can get the benefits as per the MSME (where Capital Investment is up to INR 10 Cr.) and Incentives available to larger tourism projects (where Capital Investment is above INR 10 Cr.) as Government has granted industrial status to tourism industry also.
1. Hotels, Motels
2. Floatels / Floating resorts
3. Expansion of existing Hotels/Resorts etc. (min. expansion/ addition of 15 rooms per Hotel/Resort unit)
4. Heritage Hotels/Entities 
Yoga, Ayurveda and Naturopathy Resorts Spa & health resorts/ Wellness resorts
Ecolodges & Perennial Camps
Tourist resort/tourist village
Local cuisine restaurants
Restaurants
Wayside facilities on National Highways or State Highways wherein restaurants and parking are available
Private Parking Lots
Amusement Park
MICE convention centres (minimum covered hall with carpet area of 5,000 sq. feet)
Activities in Rural tourism, Cultural Tourism
Festivals & Carnivals (Cultural, Local, Literature, Film, Food, theme based etc.)
Sound & Light shows, LASER shows etc.
Adventure activities such as - trekking, rock climbing, water sports, boat race, skating, fishing, aero sports etc.
Ropeways, funiculars etc.
Caravan, Motor Houses, Cruise boats, Yachts, house boats and establishment of boat clubs.
Operation of helium and hot air balloon, Blimps
Off-Road vehicles, air taxi, amphibians
Handicrafts / Shilpgram
Tourism or Hospitality Training Centres (including foreign language teaching centre)
Production and marketing of traditional Crafts and other artwork
Work related to maintenance of Cultural and Historical heritage
Tourism activities related to environment conservation/jungle safari/lodges etc.
Service Apartments 
Facade - All the new upcoming tourism units has to ensure that the Facade (Entrance) of the Tourism Unit resembles Uttarakhand Architecture (vernacular architecture) to promote the ironic and unique heritage of the state.
Energy Management - All the new tourism units in Urban Areas has to ensure (self-certification) that at least 10% of energy consumption through installed capacity is met through renewable energy sources. UTDB shall independently conduct an audit to verify authenticity of self-certification.
Support Infrastructure - All the new tourism units (both in Urban and Rural areas) have to ensure adequate support infra - access, parking, safety etc. while planning the tourism unit.
Viability Gap Funding (V6F) - As per incentives from the Ministry of Tourism, viabilily gap funding shall be available to tourism infrastructure projects that are to be undertaken through Public Private Partnerships. The quantum of VGF provided under this scheme is in the form of a capital grant at the stage of project construction. The amount of VGF will be equivalent to the lowest bid for capital subsidy, but subject to a maximum of 20% of the total project cost3.
6.5 Other Conditions
The total benefits accrued from subsidies shall not be more than the cost of the project.
It shall be mandatory for beneficiary to operate the tourism units for the next five years.
If the tourism unit does not abide by these terms and conditions then it will have to return the subsidy amount with 15% simple interest to the State otherwise State may take any suitable action against the unit to recover the money.
All the tourism units who have availed the incentives shall have to report their operations, employment generation, audited financial statements and details of incentives received to the department of tourism or any agency appointed by Department on yearly basis.
inistry of Tourism, Viability Gap Scheme for Revenue Generating Tourism Projects



Conduct capacity building training programmes jointly with Uttarakhand Skill Development Mission (UKSDM) to cater the needs of various tourism service providers like drivers, cooks, guides, cleaners, front office executives etc.
The UTDB will also encourage hoteliers/travel operators/ tour agents to induct trained and National Skill Qualification Framework (NSQF) certified guides/workforce for better absorption in the tourism sector
Department of Tourism shall prepare a framework for Hotel Industry to rate hotels in broader categories of Gold, Silver & Bronze basis the level of services provided
All efforts shall be made to develop skills required for the tourism sector with help of national level apex institutes like IITTM, IIFM, Culinary Inst. Noida, IHMs& National Skill Development Corporation (NSDC) etc.
A pool of consultants / experts/ tourism aggregators shall be empanelled to provide necessary training like general etiquettes, English speaking and other languages, cooking, nature guides, heritage guides, resort operations etc. as required.
UTDB shall periodically identify interested youths, operators, students, entrepreneurs to provide capacity building and training in the hospitality sector - some of such themes are as follows - Naturalist, Heritage Monument Guides, General
Etiquettes/Guest Handling, Guest PR, Cooking, House-keeping, F&B, Language Proficiency - English / French etc.
Certification - UTDB will periodically certify tourism sector workforce and arrange refresher courses for earlier certified guides for standardization and knowledge up-gradation.
In addition UTDB shall also recognise and certify already employed Tourism Workforce through Pradhan Mantri Kausha! Vikas Yojna under Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL). 
Skill Development
The Uttarakhand Skill Development Mission has been providing free skill development training programmes to youth over all 13 districts. Special skilling centre shall be established develop concerning the tourism unit area besides, trained youth shall be given priority in Government aided schemes.
Incentives and subsidies to private sector shall be given for providing skill development and training in tourism sector.
Convergence with Central Government schemes like Hunar se Rozgar Yojna of Ministry of Tourism and other ministries shall be ensured.
UTDB shall reimburse 100% course fee of incumbents / trainees belonging to women, disadvantaged, under-privileged and economic weaker sections of the society in tourism and allied domains.
State-level awards shall be given to encourage organizations and individuals working in the field of tourism for appreciation and recognition of Self Employment.


8.1 Marketing, Branding and Use of ICT
^ Aggressive Branding and Marketing exercises shall be
undertaken by the Department/UTDB and the State will launch its new marketing campaign to boost tourist inflow and better outreach.
^ UTDB shall appoint reputed marketing and branding
consultants/ agencies/ firms for promoting the tourism.
^ Presence of State Tourism in international and national tourism events/marts, roadshows, expo's etc. shall be ensured.
^ UTDB shall give more emphasis on imparting awareness on policy incentives and subsidies to locals, so that they can benefit the most and trigger self-employment.
^ UTDB shall ensure strengthening of ICT infrastructure to provide year round access to all destinations in the State especially the remote tourist locations.
^ UTDB shall liaison with mobile operators to ensure good
connectivity for all tourism destinations in the State especially far-flung areas.
^ A four-digit 24X7 Tourism Helpline number shall be set up to provide instant help to tourists. This service will be made available and run in Hindi, English and other prominent foreign languages which may be added in due course.
^ The strength of Tourist Police shall be increased and shall be deployed at all prominent tourism spots. Special emphasis shall be given to the security of female tourists.
^ Cleanliness drives at important tourist destinations with the
help of Student self service groups CBO’s, corporate etc. shall be conducted.
^ The State shall organize annual excellence awards to honour individual/organizations doing exemplary work in the field of tourism to encourage provision of best services by them.
^ To provide information to the tourists, Tourism Information Centres shall established at prominent airports, railway stations and bus stations of the country. 
^ State's image shall be improved through strategic advertising campaigns through print, electronic and outdoor media.
^ Tourism information, research and forecasts shall be made more effective to serve the needs of the industry and Government.
^ Use of social media shall be maximized for tourism publicity.
Department’s website, fecebook page, Twitter handle etc. will be enriched further.
Z Tourists shall be provided information’s with the better use of
information technology and communication mediums. They shall be given tourism friendly information. Through mobile based applications
^ In order to facilitate and augment tourism sector investments, the State shall organise Exhibitions &Tourism Investment Summits regularly to showcase various tourism offerings like; Potential Tourism Projects, Souvenirs,
^ Handicrafts, Policy Incentives and Subsidies etc. through the Exhibition & Tourism Investment Summits.
^ The Department shall organise an annual Carnival on a larger scale in which cultural parades, musical nights, sound and light shows, fireworks shall be included besides, activities attracting tourist shall also be included etc. Special package targeting Carnival shall be prepared for making it a vibrant event.
^ Digital Marketing techniques shall be utilized to inform and educate tourists on the uniqueness of the tourist destinations and products thereby enhancing the State’s image and perception.
^ Department of Tourism shall create mobile application and
knowledge based games to cater to the new generation of tourists.
^ The Department of Tourism portal www.uttarkhandtourism.gov.
inshall be the primary gateway for all consumer and trade marketing programmes.
8.2 Commencement
The Uttarakhand tourism policy 2018 shall come into form the date of
issuing notification in this regard by State government and shall applicable
for next Five years. The implementation of the policy shall be reviewed every
year at State level and amendments shall be made as required.









































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(a) Tourism means all types of tourism in modern parlance such as religious Tourism, Cultural Tourism, Pilgrimage Tourism, Adventure Tourism, Sports Tourism, Medical & Wellness Tourism, Heli tourism, Ecotourism, Film Tourism, Wildlife Tourism, etc.
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Uttarakhand
Theme-wise Major Destinations
MICE
Adventure
Pilgiimage, Cultural & Festivals Wildlife & Bird Sanctuaries Nature & Landscape Health, Rejuvenation & Spiritual Eco / Rural Tourism




India
OTvra^
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--• *
Uttarakhand Tourism Policy 2018 | 65 
5.2 A ^TWT 砰 3T^5IIH-|
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Monipur Tourism Policy



















































Sl. No. Particular
1. Introduction
2. Mission Statement & Principle
3. Aims & Objectives
4. Current Scenario and Swot Analyses
5. Thrust Areas : Niche Tourism Products
6. Action Plan
7. Strategy for implementation of action plan
& Promotion of thrust areas
8. Manipur Tourism Brochure


1
INTRODUCTION
Tourism emerged as the largest global industry of the 20th century and is projected to grow even faster in the 21stcentury. Manipur has immense possibilities of growth in the tourism sector with vast cultural and religious heritage, varied natural attractions, but a comparatively small role in the national tourism scene. Manipur Tourism Policy, 2014 which envisages new initiatives towards making tourism the catalyst in employment generation, environmental re-generation, development of remote areas and development of women and other disadvantaged groups in the State, besides promoting social integration is, therefore, vital to the State's economy.
According to the UN World Tourism Organization, contribution of tourism to economic activities worldwide is estimated at about 5%.Tourism takes the cake for creation of 6-7% job opportunities, both direct and indirect worldwide. While in 1950, the top destinations absorbed 88% of international arrivals, it was 55% in 2010, reflecting the emergence of new destinations, many of them in developing countries. UNWTO points out that developing country stand to benefit from sustainable tourism and should act to make this a reality. According to the Planning Commission, the earnings from Travel & Tourism (T&T) have made it one of the largest industries in the world and the fastest growing sector of global trade accounting for 10.4% of global GDP, 12.2% of global exports, 8.3% of global employment, and 9.5% of global capital investment. The receipts generated have grown twice as fast, far outstripping the growth rate of the world economy.
India is fast emerging as an important tourism destination in the world. The 'Incredible India"campaign, which showcases the best that India has to offer to the tourists, has now attracted worldwide attention. Foreign tourist arrivals in India increased from 2.37 million in 1997 to 20.73 million in 2012. The Foreign Exchange Earnings (FEE) from tourism by these arrivals grew at an even stronger rate reaching around USD 1774 million in 2012. The year 2012 witnessed a growth of 19.9% in domestic tourist visits over the year 2011, which is higher than the growth of 13.8% in the year 2011 over 2010. During, 2012, the visits by the foreign tourists registered a growth of 6.3% over 2011. By 2017, tourism industry is expected to contribute USD 3121 billion in absolute terms but in percentage terms it is likely to decrease to 3.4% as estimated by the Planning Commission.
Manipur with its inherent tourism potential, rich cultural heritage and vibrant pool of youth, with excellent grip over English language is an ideal place for promotion of Tourism as its main industry and sector to generate employment substantially. Our young boys and girls are working in every nook and comer of India in hospitality industry, owing to their good mannerism, friendly attitude, pleasant approach to the clients and fluent English. With such rich talent, which is bound to multiply manifold, after establishment of upcoming Institute of Hotel Management, Catering Technology & Applied Nutrition at Imphal, planned development of Tourism Infrastructure and aggressive marketing of Manipur Tourism would lead to create an employment potential to the tune of 10-15%, as against 6-7% globally. Increased employment opportunities are bound to facilitate improvement in Law & Order and perceptible decrease in insurgency.
Tourism Industry per se would create employment opportunities at every tier be it a Luggage handler, Porter, Waiter/Waitress, Front Desk Official, Managers, Accountants, etc. The tourism industry has its own multiplier effect and thus could become the largest employment generator in the State.
Other than the tourism industry itself, the global spread of tourism has produced significant economic and employment benefits in many related and interlinked sectors too, from construction to agriculture or telecommunications. This multiplier effects of tourism need to be tapped maximally to enrich the State's economy and bring prosperity to the people.
Manipur, with her comfortable climate, mystique cultural heritage and sublime natural beauty, located strategically in a hitherto considered disadvantageous geographical area, has huge potential for the growth of tourism. Manipur tourism was given an industry status in January 1987. Since then the benefits of developing tourism in Manipur has been broadly discussed, argued and acted upon. Research reports on developing Manipur Tourism identify the tourism potential of Manipur, the need to develop it for present and for long term future gains. The State Government has been making efforts in developing Manipur Tourism by developing Infrastructures, Hotels & Restaurants, Human Resource, and through active Marketing, Publicity, Promotion Programmes, Market Research, etc.
Manipur and its tourism policy become all the more important in view of India's Look East Policy, the Trans-Asian Highways and the Railways. The Government is keen to take advantage of these developments and therefore, seeks to create a unique brand to market Manipur Tourism as the 'Gateway to South-East Asia'in conformity with its modern outlook, relevance, competitiveness, strategic location and commercial aspects. It is felt that once the appropriate infrastructure and services are suitably placed, Manipur is destined to become a popular tourist hotspot in South-East Asia akin to its South-East Asian neighbours.
Relaxation and exclusion of Manipur from the Protected Area Regime since January, 2011 has started attracting foreign tourists to the State. Ministry of Home Affairs has conveyed its, in principle, approval for establishment of VISA on Arrival (VoA) facility at Moreh and at Imphal International Airport. Once VoA facilities are operational, many Myanmarese would travel to Manipur, especially for availing medical facilities. Furthermore, Manipur, where some of the final battles of the World War-II were fought, can receive a big impetus in the tourism sector attracting many foreign tourists, especially from Japan and the Commonwealth countries whose relatives, ancestors and countrymen lost their lives in the battlefield here.
Efforts of the State Government to promote tourism as an important industry would have to be synergized with our efforts to improve the law and order situation in the State as well as propagate the message to the people, both within India and abroad, that Manipur, despite internal conflicts and insurgency, is a safe place for the tourists. Unless we propagate this message to the intending tourists, the apprehensions in their mind about safety would not be addressed effectively which in turn create negative publicity and be detrimental to our efforts in promoting Manipur Tourism. Therefore, the State has to take proactive steps in finding a permanent solution to the insurgency and social instability to bring about peace and convey to the outside world that Manipur is a safe and pleasant place to visit. Improvement in law and order would not only lead to increased tourist arrivals but also attract investors from outside the State.
The 'Manipur Tourism Policy, 2014' consists of consolidated report on the recent developments in tourism and highlights the current scenario of the State. It attempts to position tourism as the major engine of economic growth, to harness the immense tourism potential and position 'Manipur' as a preferred tourist destination at global level, by proposing both short term as well as long term measures.
The ‘Policy' strives to develop tourism in Manipur taking into consideration the guidelines of the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India. It also attempts to address the issues related to tourist's interest as well as satisfactory customer/guest services which will serve as a tool to attract more tourists. The ‘Policy' also focuses on community participation and involvement of private entrepreneurs for comprehensive development of tourism industry in the State.
The Mission of the ‘Policy' is to promote sustainable tourism as a means of economic growth, social integration and to promote the image of Manipur as a State with a glorious past, a vibrant present and a bright future. Policies to achieve this will be evolved around six broad areas such as Welcome, Information, Facilitation, Safety, Cooperation and Infrastructure Development. Conservation of heritage, natural environment and development and promotion of tourism products would also be given importance.
2
MISSION STATEMENT & PRINCIPLES
The mission of Manipur Tourism Policy, 2013 is to provide proper direction that will drive the tourism industry in Manipur and to let the dynamics of the industry take over thereafter. The 'Policy' seeks to harness the tourism potential of Manipur and to attract tourists and investments with the development of hotels & restaurants, resorts, transport, communication, heritage sites, handloom & handicrafts, home-stays & village stays among other ancillary trades/activities. These developments will ultimately help in creating jobs, earning revenue and thus contributing to the economy of the State which in turn would enhance the income level of the people.
The State intends to create a robust and vibrant tourism industry through planned, innovative and systematic approach producing an efficient tourism multiplier largely governed by diversity of tourism products, lengthening the period & comfort of stay, and creating various spending avenues. The overall efforts shall be market based taking into account the preferences of the tourists and service providers.
Our vision is to create a unique brand for the State to develop and market critical infrastructure in a sustainable and integrated manner to make Manipur a favourite national and international tourist destination with a view to provide an unique experience to the visiting tourists besides ensuring that the quality of life and economic benefits are trickled down to the needy sections and bringing overall prosperity to the people in the State.
The policy rest upon the following basic principles:
2.1. In a small remote land-locked State like Manipur where there is less scope of industrial development, but with a rich cultural heritage and sublime natural beauty, tourism promises to emerge as the main avenue for creating employment opportunities, income generation and alleviating poverty. Accordingly, the 'Policy' proposes to facilitate incentives/subsidy for development and promotion of tourism industry in the State.
2.2. The tourism industry promises to provide significant direct and indirect employment. The employment creation potential for investments made in tourism sector promises to be higher than in manufacturing and agricultural sectors. Tourism development would also help significantly in the development of cottage industries and handloom & handicrafts, and thereby promote overall area development and development of weaker sections of the society.
2.3. Considering India's Look East Policy, many tourists would be passing through the State when the Trans-Asian Highway No. 1 is fully developed. Operation of railway line would also bring in large stream of tourists. The immediate challenge shall be on devising ways to cater to their needs and comfort, and persuading them to stay a little longer and explore the rich cultural heritage and scenic beauty of the State.
2.4. Establishment of inter-departmental and inter-agency linkages is crucial to the development of tourism. Public Works, Public Health Engineering, Municipal Administration Housing & Urban Development (MAHUD), Rural Development, Power, Health, Home, Forest and Arts &
Culture Departments are important departments which need to play a critical role. Close association shall also be established with NGOs, Clubs, Security Forces, Civil Aviation Authorities and others.
2.5. The North-Eastern States of India are seen as a contiguous region without borders from a tourist's point of view. Therefore, effective co-ordination and cooperation with the neighbouring States shall be pursued for joint development of tourism in the region and shared tourist circuits with a view to facilitate easy, hassle free movement of tourists.
2.6. The Tourism Policy must benefit people. The multiplier effects of the industry need to trickle down and help in creating employment opportunities for the youths, preserving cultural heritage, empowerment of women, encouraging local artisans, development of backward regions, enhancing income and alleviation of poverty.
2.7. Tourism is overwhelmingly an industry of private sector/service providers and hence their critical role shall be duly acknowledged. The ‘Policy' seeks to sensitize all stakeholders on the shared vision which is very essential for a highly efficient, responsive and sustainable tourism industry. Tourism in Manipur shall be government led, private-sector driven and community welfare oriented.
2.8. Prioritization of projects both for destinations and infrastructure is necessary so that scarce resources are put to best use.
2.9. The immediate priority would be on creating world class accommodation& infrastructure, identification, improvement and up-gradation of destinations and other tourism assets and making these operational under Public-Private Partnership.
2.10. Promotion, publicity and marketing are the core of tourism development and need to be undertaken in conformity with tourist profiles and product characteristics.
2.11. The necessity of developing sustainable and responsible tourism to ensure preservation and protection of tourist destinations would be the backbone of the ‘Policy'. It will not only secure long term gains but also help mitigate the adverse impacts of tourism development.
2.12. The safety and security of the tourists shall be paramount on the Government's agenda. Considering the unique law & order situation prevailing in Manipur, promotion of tourism would be carefully undertaken. Even the trouble torn State like Jammu & Kashmir attracts a large number of tourists due to its unique tourist destinations and the facilities provided to the tourists and therefore, Manipur should not shy away from promotion of tourism under the veil of law and order considerations. State Government, in consultation with Government of India, would make positive interventions to improve law & order, create secure & safe atmosphere and work towards a permanent solution to decades old insurgency problem with a view to make Manipur a safe place for the visitors in a time bound manner. Once peace and harmony is stabilized, Manipur with its intrinsic tourism potential is likely to become a preferred destination for the tourists, both domestic as well as foreign. Tourism development in the State would itself create enough job opportunities and avenues for recreation, which in turn would dilute the insurgency substantially and help the State in bringing peace and stabilization in a time bound manner.
2.13. Whenever opportunity arises, Manipur Tourism should play a pivotal and dynamic role to make its presence felt at the international level.
2.14. Tourism in Manipur should be able to provide a unique opportunity for physical invigoration, mental rejuvenation, cultural enrichment and spiritual elevation for a memorable experience for the visiting tourists. The economic benefits of the industry should be able to filter down to the backward sections of the society and bring all round development of the State.
2.15. Sustained efforts would be made to comprehensively improve Welcome, Information, Hospitality, Accommodation, Transportation, Safety, Leisure, Hygiene and Environment, etc.
2.16. Implementation of policy statements and declarations made at various North-Eastern Council meetings organized by the Ministry for Development of North Eastern Region, Government of India for accelerated development of the North-Eastern Region.
2.17. To promote State tourism, local products and cuisines will be effectively marketed and publicized.
2.18. The promoters of tourism industry, hotels and travel agents will be encouraged to evolve and strictly follow Act, Rules and Guidelines prescribed and enforced by the Central Government and State Government.
2.19. Comprehensive programme for capacity development and hospitality promotion shall be organized from time to time in consultation with all stakeholders.
2.20. Manipur is ideally suited for adventure tourism. It would be the endeavour of the Tourism Department and PWD to develop seamless connectivity and encourage adventure Tourism.


3
AIMS & OBJECTIVES
The broad objectives of tourism development are:
i. Foster understanding between people.
ii. Create employment opportunities.
iii. Bringing socio-economic benefits to the people of Manipur.
iv. Strive towards balanced and sustainable development; and
v. Preserve, enrich and promote State's cultural and natural heritage.
One of the major objectives is the preservation of natural resources and environment to achieve sustainable development.
Given the low cost of employment creation in the tourism sector and the low level of exploitation of Manipur's tourism potential, the new tourism policy seeks to expand and facilitate domestic as well as foreign tourists in a manner that is sustainable by ensuring cultural preservation and minimizing any possible degradation of environment.
The Manipur Tourism Policy, 2014 also aims at making the stay of tourists in the State, a memorable and pleasant one with reliable services at predictable costs, so that they are encouraged to undertake repeated visits to Manipur State, as friends. This would be in tune with Manipur's traditional philosophy of giving the highest honour to a guest.
3.1 Tourism A Multi-Dimensional Activity
a. The Government will aim to achieve necessary linkages and synergies in the policies and programs of all concerned Departments/Agencies by establishing effective co-ordination mechanisms. The focus of the policy, therefore, will also be to develop tourism as a common endeavor of all the agencies vitally concerned with it.
b. It will be the policy of the Government to encourage people's participation in tourism development including Panchayati Raj Institutions, Local Bodies, Co-operatives, Non-Governmental Organisations and Enterprising Local Youth to create public awareness and to achieve a wider spread of tourist facilities. However, focused attention will be given for the integrated development of identified destinations with well-directed public participation.
c. Public and Private Sector Partnership: A constructive and mutually beneficial partnership between the public and the private sectors through all feasible means may be developed so that the Government and Private enterprises can join hands to maximize tourism development and for the sustained growth of tourism. It is, therefore, the policy of the Government to encourage emergence of such a partnership. The framework as indicated in 'Policy' will facilitate enhanced private participation in the tourism development activities. This will be achieved by creating a Tourism Development Society consisting of senior officials of the Government and tourism experts and professionals from the private sector.
d. Role of the Government: Tourism is a multi-sectoral activity and the industry is affected by many other sectors of the economy. The State has to, therefore, ensure inter¬governmental linkages and co-ordination. It also has to play a pivotal role in tourism management and promotion. The specific role of the Government will be to:
i. Provide basic infrastructure facilities including local planning and zoning arrangements.
ii. Plan tourism development as a part of the overall area development strategy.
iii. Create core infrastructure in the initial stages of development to demonstrate the potential of the area.
iv. Provide the required support facilities and incentives to both domestic and foreign investors to encourage private investment in the tourism sector.
v. Rationalize taxation and land policies in the tourism sector.
vi. Introduce regulatory measures to ensure social, cultural and environmental sustainability as well as safety and security of tourists.
vii. Ensure that the type and scale of tourism development is compatible with the environment and socio-cultural milieu of the area.
viii. Ensure that the local community is fully involved and the benefits of tourism accrue to them.
ix. Facilitate availability of trained manpower particularly from amongst the local population jointly with the industry.
x. Undertake research, prepare master plans, and facilitate formulation of marketing strategies.
xi. Organize overseas promotion and marketing jointly with the industry.
xii. Initiate specific measures to ensure safety and security of tourists and efficient facilitation services.
xiii. Facilitate the growth of a dynamic tourism sector.
xiv. Ensure that prevailing Acts & Rules, Guidelines on forest & environment and their protection and conservation are taken care of.
xv. Ensure adequate availability of power for all tourism projects in the State
e. Role of Private Sector: Tourism has emerged as the largest export industry globally and all over the globe private sector has played the lead role in this growth. The private sector has to consider investment in tourism from a long term perspective and create the required facilities including accommodation, time share, restaurants, entertainment facilities, shopping complexes, etc. in areas identified for tourism development. Non-core activities in airport, major stations and inter-state bus terminus such as cleanliness and maintenance, luggage transportation, vehicles parking facilities, etc. should be opened-up to private operators to increase efficiency and profitability.
The specific role of the Private Sector will be to:
i. Build and manage the required tourist facilities in all places of tourist interest.
ii. Assume collective responsibility for laying down industry standards, ethics and fair practices.
iii. Ensure preservation and protection of tourist attractions and give lead in green practices.
iv. Sponsor maintenance of monuments, museums & parks and provision of public conveniences & facilities.
v. Involve the local community in tourism projects and ensure that the benefits of tourism accrue to them in right measure.
vi. Undertake industry training and man-power development to achieve excellence in quality of services.
vii. Participate in the preparation of investment guidelines and marketing strategies and also assist in database creation and research.
viii. Facilitate safety and security of tourists.
ix. Endeavour to promote tourism on a sustained and long term perspective.
x. Collaborate with Government in the promotion and marketing of destinations.
f. Role of Voluntary efforts: Voluntary agencies and volunteers have to contribute their expertise and understanding of local ethos to supplement the efforts of other sectors to provide the human touch to tourism and foster local initiatives. All such efforts shall be encouraged.
g. Role of PRIs: Tourism assets could be effectively operated by the community organizations with the right training, incentive system and ownership sharing norms. The need to involve village level institutions is all the more relevant given the current state of law and order in the State and the huge investments made towards providing tourist infrastructure in deep interior locations across the State where urban entrepreneurs may not be keen to operate. Further, land ownership is also a critical issue in the State, especially in those areas where there are practices of community ownership of land. It is necessary to address the issue of ownership of tourism assets already created on community lands as well as those assets that may be in the pipeline.
3.2 Tourism Development Fund and Resources for Development
It would be the policy of the Government to facilitate larger flow of funds to tourism infrastructure and to create a Tourism Development Fund to bridge critical infrastructural gaps. Since, State Plan funding would be involved in the initial stage, Planning Department would be consulted for mapping out funding pattern.
Priority would be given for development of tourist infrastructure in selected areas of tourist importance and for those products which are considered to be in demand in the existing and future markets so that limited resources are put to the best use.
3.3 Foreign Investments, Incentives and Rationalization of Taxes
In view of large investment requirements in the tourism sector and the need for maintaining high quality standards in services, hotels and tourism related industries will continue to be in the priority list of industries for foreign investment.
In order to off-set the specific constraints of tourism industry and to put in place the required infrastructure as quickly as possible, particularly in less developed areas, appropriate incentive schemes would be considered. It would also be the endeavour of the Government to rationalize taxes, to put a cap of 20% on all taxes taken together on the accommodation and hospitality units, to allocate suitable land for tourism purposes at reasonable prices, harmonize movement of tourist transport across State borders, etc. Tourism Department will work out the annual fund requirement for this purpose. Since, incentives/subsidy should be outcome based and not investment based, it should be performance-linked and transparent parameters for this purpose would be devised.
The exemption of taxes will be subject to prior concurrence of Finance Department. The exemptions should be unit specific and period of exemption would also be as per the actual requirement of the unit in question.
The selection of private partner will be through fair and competitive bidding process and concurrence of Finance Department will be obtained on case to case basis. The Selection of Licensee be made by fair and transparent procedure and rate of royalties to be received by the Government will be decided in consultation with Finance Department.
3.4 Adoption of New Technologies
a. Efforts will be made to adopt the technological advances in the tourism sector to provide better facilities to tourists and to market the tourism product, to the benefit of all concerned.
b. Information Technology shall be given the pride of place in the efforts to promote Manipur tourism. Every endeavour in this regard would increasingly rely on optimising the use of e- commerce/m-commerce, use of internet for dissemination of tourism related information, increasing use of portals as gateway to accessibility to tourism information, development of Handy Audio Reach Kit (HARK) Tourist Guidance System at important monuments/heritage sites, networking of States, setting of tourist information kiosks, encouragement to information technology and eco-friendly practices by the private industries and above all keeping in sync with the global technologies for promoting and facilitating tourism.
c. The State Government will set up a modern Tourist Interpretation Centre to cater to various needs of travelers, foreign as well as domestic and to offer facilities for air and train reservation, money changing counters and information about all tourist centres in the State. The Centre will be equipped with e-connectivity and networking facility.
The economic and social benefits of tourism and its importance as an instrument of economic growth have to be fully recognized by all sections of the society. It would, therefore, be the endeavour of the State Government to bridge the information gap through proper statistical documentation of the impact of tourism and its wide publicity to create awareness so that the economic and social significance of tourism is well recognized and tourism is given due attention and priority.
3.5 Safety and Security
The safety and security of tourists are of primary importance both from the point of view of tourism development and the State pride. It will be, therefore, given high priority in the strategy for tourism development. The State Government would enact suitable legislation on travel trade/ tourist police for protection and security of tourists and for providing institutional mechanism to deal with complaints received from tourists and the industry so as to create a better security perception amongst actual and potential visitors.
3.6 Facilitation Services
Tourists have to pass through several Government agencies so as to meet the requirements under various laws. These include obtaining visas, undergoing immigration checks, obtaining permits to visit certain areas, payment of fees for certain facilities, etc. The endeavour of the Government would be to improve efficiency in providing such facilitation services and make travel to and within State a pleasant experience. Introduction of issue of Visa on arrival at least for 15 days at the airport, computerisation of the system of issue of Visa, streamlining of luggage handling system at airports, improving tourist facilitation services at the airports by adopting technological solutions are some of the important facilitation services proposed in this regard.
3.7 Tourism Economic Zone, Tourist Circuits, Special Tourism Area and Areas of Special Interests
a. Tourism Economic Zones will be created with private participation based on the intrinsic attractions, potential for development and availability of resources in these zones. Air, road and rail connectivity to these areas will be established to facilitate direct and easy access to these zones from international and domestic destinations. Adequate backward and forward linkages will also be established to ensure flow of benefits to the local community. The development of such zones will be guided by well-conceived Master Plans and executed by specific Tourism Development Society which will be created by the Government involving senior officers from the Department of Tourism, and other relevant Departments, professionals from tourism industry and representatives of Industry & Trade Associations.
b. Manipur with vast cultural and religious heritage and varied natural attractions has immense potential for growth in the tourism sector. Travel circuits and destinations would be developed through joint efforts of the Central Government, the State Government and the Private Sector. Loktak Lake and its vicinity would be declared as Special Tourism Area for integrated development. Steps will be taken to work towards the integrated development of all the tourist circuits with the involvement of all the infrastructure departments and the private sector.
c. Creation of Tourism Zones in forest land will be as per the provisions of Forest Conservation Act, 1980.
3.8 Sustainable Development and Perspective Plans
The principle of sustainable development stipulates that the level of development does not exceed the carrying capacity of the area. It will be Governments' policy to ensure adherence to such limits through appropriate planning instruments, guidelines and enabling regulations and their enforcement. Efforts will be made to diversify the tourism products in such a way that it supplements the main stream of cultural tourism. Comprehensive perspective plans for developing sustainable tourism by assessing the existing tourism scenario with respect to availability of natural resources, heritage and other socio-cultural assets, quantitative/demographic factors like population, employment, occupation, income levels etc., services and infrastructure will be developed by initiating immediate action in this direction. Carrying capacity at critical tourist destinations would be enhanced in a planned manner to provide major boost to the tourism industry in the State.
3.9 Conservation and Development
Tourism development needs to be properly guided and regulated to avoid adverse impact on the natural environment and cultural heritage which constitute the tourist attraction. A judicious balance needs to be maintained between conservation and development. Government will continue its policy of trying to maintain balance through planning restrictions and by educating the people in appreciating their rich heritage and by eliciting their co-operation in preserving and protecting it.
3.10 Promotion and Marketing
Promotion and marketing is an important component of tourism development and needs to be undertaken along with product development in conformity with consumer profiles and product characteristics. The policy of the Government, therefore, will be to develop and implement cost effective marketing strategies based on market research and segment analysis in each of the tourist generating country. Sustained efforts would be made for identifying possible markets, both domestic as well as overseas, after carefully studying the connectivity with the key cities.
3.11 International Co-operation
Tourism is a global industry requiring inputs from various international agencies and collaborations with other countries. The policy of the Government, therefore, will be to foster positive win-win partnership with all the international agencies and other countries. With the declaration of Imphal Airport as an 'International Airport', the immediate focus should be to quickly upgrade it and introduce International Flights viz., Imphal^Mandalay ^ Yangon ^ Bangkok etc.
3.12 Professional Excellence
Tourism being a service industry, it is necessary to enhance its service efficiency. The new policy will strive towards excellence by introducing professionalism through training and re-training of human resources and providing memorable visitor experience to both domestic as well as international tourists.
4
CURRENT SCENARIO & SWOT ANALYSES
4.1 Current scenario
Manipur is blessed with the majestic Loktak Lake, the strategic location of Moreh town, the uniqueness of the floating Keibul-Lamjao National Park & the Sangai Deer, the beauty of the & Dzukou Lilies, along with the naturally formed limestone caves, pristine green hills and valleys, meandering rivers, cascading rapids, exotic flora & fauna complimented by a rich arts & culture, folklore, myths & legends, indigenous games and artistic handloom & handicrafts. These make Manipur a little paradise on earth and an enticing destination for a tourist to explore. The Asian Development Bank has identified the region as a ‘Key Area' due to its ‘unrealized potential as an eco-tourism product'.
The mystery of the Indian Classical Dance form Raas-Leela with their intricate costume design, the wonder of the Pung-Cholom (Drum Dance), the vibrant tribal dances, the local handloom and handicrafts are some of the precious treasures any tourist will find appealing. The exotic cuisines, the unique tribal cultures and the soothing native music can be an enchanting discovery for various tourists visiting the State. The birthplace of modern Polo, the indigenous games of Yubi Lakpi, Kang Sanaba, Arambai, Thang-Ta and Mukna will prove to be a thrilling experience for any enthusiastic tourist. Weaving is a time-honoured occupation in the land and has been fine-tuned to an art form with its intricate designs.
Despite enormous potential of Tourism in Manipur, its development in the bygone years remained trivial due to various reasons. The erstwhile PAP regime for entry of foreigners while entering the State; the remote geographical location of the State with resultant accessibility and connectivity issue; poor availability of resources leading to poor economy; lack of infrastructures, facilities & amenities to cater to various types of tourists; lack of subject specific professionals & experts, lack of training & tourism awareness, lack of co-ordination between departments, etc. are the major hindrances for harnessing State's immense tourism potential. The problem is further compounded by frequent bands, road blockades, strikes, protests, etc. resulting to social unrests. Manipur has been afflicted by insurgency which often deters tourists. However, the situation in Manipur has substantially improved recently which is an encouraging sign.
With the increase in number of air flights reaching Imphal, the capital city of the State, introduction of night landing facilities since 2011, on-going extension of railways line to Imphal from Jiribam, exclusion of Manipur from the Protected Area Regime since January, 2011, improved law & order situation, establishment of a 3-star category hotel in 2009, on-going development of other 4-star category hotels, proposed Institute of Institute of Hospitality Management (IHM) and other tourism project developments have all resulted in steady rise in number of tourist arrivals and has helped in propagating Manipur tourism in the country and the world.
With planned and professional harnessing of tourism potential, Manipur is likely to become a preferred tourist destination which in turn would help in increasing both domestic tourists arrivals as well as generating the much needed employment, socio-economic benefit, revenue and other ancillary benefits to the State.
The State Government in the recent years has given due priority and importance to the development of adequate tourism Infrastructure & Services for the development of tourism in the State. Some of the important steps taken by the State are:
• Destination Development.
• Development of Tourist Circuits.
• Adventure Tourism Development.
• Identification & celebration of Fairs & Festivals.
• Marketing, Publicity & Promotion activities.
• Culture, Arts & Crafts, Handloom promotion.
• Human Resource Development.
• Participation in National and International events.
• Tourism Master Plan.
> Destination Development Projects sanctioned till 2013-14
i. Improvement of the surrounding of INA Complex at Moirang.
ii. Tourist Home at Sendra.
iii. Tourist destination at Imphal under Integrated Destination Development Scheme.
iv. Development of Eco-tourism Park at Imphal.
v. Construction of Arts & Crafts Centre at Maibam-Lokpa Ching, Bishnupur District.
vi. Integrated development of Tourist Destination in Bishnupur.
vii. Construction of Integrated Tourist Destination at Jiribam.
viii. Up-gradation of Integrated Tourist Destination at Sendra, Moirang in Bishnupur.
ix. Tourist destination development at Ishingthingbi Lake.
x. Construction of Integrated Tourist Destination at Sipuikon Village, Tipaimukh Sub-division, Churachandpur.
xi. Construction of Integrated Tourist Destination at Tupul, Senapati.
xii. Construction of Integrated Tourist Destination at Longmai (Noney), Tamenglong.
xiii. Mega Project - INA Memorial Complex at Moirang.
xiv. Eco-Tourism Complex at Thangal, Senapati (Mayangkhang).
xv. Tourist Destination development at Khongjom War Memorial Complex.
xvi. Integrated Tourist Destination at Ningthem Pukhri, Imphal-Eco-Tourism Complex, Imphal East District
xvii. Integrated Tourist Destination at Manipur Adventure and allied Sports Institute (MAASI) Complex, Keirao, Imphal East.
xviii. Integrated Tourist Destination at Mughal Garden at Waroiching, Leimaram, Bishnupur District.
xix. Integrated Tourist Destination at Kakching Garden, Thoubal District, Manipur.
xx. Integrated Tourist Destination at Kotsophai, Chakpikarong, Chandel District, Manipur.
xxi. Integrated Tourist Destination at Chingkhei Ching, Imphal East District, Manipur.
xxii. Integrated Tourist Destination of Eco-Tourism Complex at Mata Mualtam Hyde out Park, Churachandpur District, Manipur.
xxiii. Integrated Tourist Destination at Shiroy Hills at adjoining areas, Ukhrul District
> Tourist Destinations Projects prioritized for sanction during 2014-15
i. Integrated Tourist Destination at Sadu Chiru Waterfalls.
ii. Integrated Tourist Destination at Andro.
iii. Integrated Tourist Destination at Loukoipat.
iv. Integrated Tourist Destination at MaibamLokpaching and adjoining areas.
v. Integrated Tourist Destination at Singda Dam and adjoining areas.
vi. Integrated Tourist Destination at Irong Water Body & adjoining hills at Manitripukhri, Imphal.
> Development of Tourist Circuit Projects sanctioned till 2013-14
i. Integrated Tourist Circuit - Imphal-Thoubal-Pallel-Tengnoupal-Moreh.
ii. Integrated Tourist Circuit - Imphal-Bishnupur-Churachanpur.
iii. Integrated Tourist Circuit - Imphal-Luwangsangbam-Sekmai-Kanglatombi-Hengbung- Senapati-Maramkhullen-Mao.
iv. Integrated Tourist Circuit - Imphal-Mahadev-Lambui-Finch Corner-Hundung-Jessami.
v. Integrated Tourist Circuit - Leirenpat-Pruksoubi-LeisangHiden in Imphal East.
vi. Integrated Tourist Circuit - Imphal-Tuima.
vii. Integrated Tourist Circuit - Imphal-Singda Dam.
viii. Integrated Tourist Circuit - Imphal Hotel-Shilheipung-Selloy.
ix. Integrated Tourist Circuit - Imphal-Tamei.
x. Integrated Tourist Circuit - Chingphou Macha, Cingphou Achouba & Khoriphaba.
xi. Integrated Tourist Circuit - Chullouphai-Ngaloimol-Sangaikot.
xii. Integrated Tourist Circuit - Marjing Polo Complex and Heingang (Marjing Pony Sanctuary).
xiii. Integrated Tourist Circuit Linking Barak waterfalls, Tharon Cave Zeilad lake Bunning Meadow in Tamenglong District.
xiv. Integrated Tourist Circuit at Millennium Garden, Rose Garden, Kombirei Garden, Thangmeib and Sinam, Sekmai and Kanglatongbi Imphal District, Manipur.
xv. Integrated Tourist Circuit at Karang, Chaoba Ching and Thanga, Bishnupur District.
> Development of Tourist Circuit Projects prioritized for sanction during 2014-15
i. Development of Integrated Tourist Circuit around Hiyanthang Temple, Heibokching and adjoining areas.
ii. World War-II Tourist Circuit including establishment of World War-II Museum at Imphal.
> Mega Tourist Circuit Projects sanctioned till 2013-14
i. Development of Integrated Mega Tourist Circuit for Marjing Polo-Keina- Khebaching (Khongjom) in Manipur.
ii. Development of Tourist Resort at Sendra Hillock, Water Sports Complex at Takmu and other Tourism Facilities in Adjoining Area, Bishnupur District, Manipur
> Mega Tourist Circuit Project prioritized for sanction during 2014-15
i. Integrated Mega Tourist Circuit for providing of Infrastructure in and around Imphal City, Manipur
> Adventure Tourism Development
i. Infrastructure development of Adventure Tourism Complex at Lamdan.
ii. Hosting of Equestrian Championship at Imphal (Polo and Sagol Kangjei).
iii. Water Sports.
iv. Youth Adventure Tourism.
v. Purchasing of adventure sports equipments.
> Identification & celebration of Fairs and Festivals
i. Sangai Festival.
ii. Kut Festival.
iii. Mera Houchongba.
iv. Lui-Ngai-Ni.
v. Pineapple Festival.
vi. Orange Festival.
vii. Lemon Festival.
viii. Loktak Day.
ix. Lily Week.
> Marketing, Publicity & Promotion activities
i. Pictorial Book on Manipur.
ii. Development of Photo CD-ROM on Tourist interest in Manipur.
iii. Design & Development of Interactive Website of Manipur Tourism.
iv. Brochures, Calendar, Posters and other relevant material.
v. Promotion of Manipur Tourism through 'Incredible India' campaign.
> Culture, Arts & Crafts, Handloom Promotion
i. Promotion of Cultural Festivals at various location of the State.
ii. Participation in Arts & Crafts Exhibitions and Melas.
iii. Promotion of Handloom products.
> Human Resource Development
i. Establishment of Institute of Hotel Management (IHM).
ii. Tourists Reception-cum-Information Centres.
iii. Development of Human Resources, Training and Capacity Building Programmes.
iv. Network of travel agents, tour operators and other services providers.
> Participation in National and International events
i. South Asia Travel and Tourism Exchange (SATTE), 2013 at New Delhi.
ii. North-East International Tourism Mart, 2013 at Guwahati and at Tawang.
iii. International Tourism Mart, London.
iv. International Tourism Bourse, Berlin.
v. Travel and Tourism Fair, Kolkata, Ahmedabad & Mumbai.
> Large Revenue Generating Scheme (LRGS)
i. Integrated Cable-Car and Lakeside Tourism Development at Loktak Lake, Manipur'
> Tourism Master Plan
Preparation of Tourism Master Plan by the State Government on the lines of Integrated Tourism Master Plan for North-East prepared by NEC/DoNER& Ministry of Tourism through the Tata Consultancy Services.
4.2. SWOT Analysis
Assessment of Manipur's product offerings show that in spite of the richness in terms of eco/nature, religious, cultural and adventure offerings, tourism has not picked up in Manipur. A major reason for this is the lack of a proper environment for tourism to prosper in the State. This environment has many attributes like:
• Security for the tourist to visit places freely.
• Proper infrastructures in terms of availability of transport, suitable accommodation, ATM facilities and information centres.
• Readiness of the product to attract new tourists and increase repeat VISITORS.
Manipur scores low in terms of security and infrastructure but has the potential to show a turnaround if proper efforts are put in this regard. Manipur has a lot to offer in terms of historical places and monuments like Kangla, which is the ancient capital of the State. This holds a lot more importance and is one of the most important archeological sites. It is famous for its fortress, sacred places like ‘Nungjeng Pukhri', which is a sacred pond believed to be the abode of lord Pakhangba, ‘Shri Shri Govindaji Temple' and many others.
Its culture is equally rich. Manipur dance is one of the classical dance forms of India, a depiction of ‘Raas Leela', which is the celebration and yearning of the 'gopies' (milkmaids of Brindavan) for Lord Krishna. There are cultural festivals in Manipur, which mark celebrations throughout the year. The most important among these is 'Yaoshang' - a festival of Manipuri Hindus and is marked with celebrations and Manipur folk dance called 'Thabal Chongba' in which boys and girls hold hands together and sing and dance.
Another great advantage for Manipur is its variety in terms of landscape and water bodies. There are good trekking routes across the State for adventure lovers, and at the same time beautiful lakes like Loktak Lake, which provides a serene environment for the nature lovers. There are opportunities and hot spots to develop many forms of adventure sports like rafting, para-gliding and angling.
A. STRENGTHS
• Variety in terms of tourism offerings. The State has destinations that can cater to religious, adventure, eco/leisure tourism segments of the market.
• Offers a cultural treat through the Manipuri dance forms and an adventure treat through avenues for sports.
• Unique Loktak Lake. 
WEAKNESSES
• Security and internal conflicts - both in terms of perception and reality.
• Lack of Visa-on-Arrival facility to Myanmar's citizens at Moreh-Tamu border.
• Limited tourism infrastructure facilities, particularly in terms of quality, experience and site services.
• Many projects are delayed in implementation, causing development lags.
• Lack of good road infrastructure leading to poor connectivity with the Tourist spots/destinations.
C. OPPORTUNITIES
• Presence of border town like Moreh and the international boundary with Myanmar has been looked as an opportunity to develop border markets.
• Linkages to the circuits within the region with major highway development connecting destinations across States and South-East Asian Countries.
• Fostering coordination with other States on developing tourism.
• Opening up of Railway line upto Imphal.
• Declaration of Imphal Airport as an ‘International Airport'.
D. THREATS
• Instability and perception of lack of security in the region with potential to affect tourism movement.
• The continuous fear of unstable environment can make the tourism investment climate unattractive.
• Over use and commercialization of sensitive eco-zones may lead to depletion of resources and dilution of attraction.
5
THRUST AREAS: NICHE TOURISM PRODUCTS
Niche tourism products related to the special interests of tourist target markets shall be improved, developed and promoted to position Manipur as an unique and competitive destination for tourists both domestic and international.
5.1 NATURE/ECO-TOURISM
i. Nature tourism is the travel through and enjoyment of the natural world, its seasonal cycles and events, carried out in a manner that promotes the protection of natural and human communities. Community leaders, public officials, agencies, and others who are interested in sustainable nature tourism will find tools to get started and links to other helpful information. A sustainable nature tourism industry is directly related to the type, amount and quality of natural capital in community.
ii. Manipur has a rich flora and fauna with a comfortable climate which can provide a variety to nature/eco-tourism. ^
iii. Formulation of eco-tourism policy and a joint task force, which may include the adoption of regime for regulation of tourism activities in and around Keibul Lamjao National Park and Loktak Lake, in consultation with the Department of Forest, Department of Ecology & Environment and Loktak Development Authority, to focus on conservation and enhancing the eco-tourism experience. This shall also essentially include Dzukou Valley, Hills, Tamenglong, Koubru Hills, Baruni Hills, Jiri-Makru Wildlife Sanctuary, Zeilad Wildlife Sanctuary and Bunning Wildlife Sanctuary in Tamenglong District, Kailam Wildlife Sanctuary in Churachandpur District, Yangoupokpi Lokchao Wildlife Sanctuary in Chandel District, National Park in Ukhrul District, Manipur Zoological Garden, Khongampat Orchid Preservation Centre etc.
iv. The Keibul Lamjao National Park (KLNP), the world's only floating park and the natural habitat of the Sangai (Brow-Antlered) deer, shall be promoted as an integral part of Manipur's tourism product. Priority shall be given to the preparation of the site and visitor management plans and further enhancement of the quality of tourist facilities available at KLNP.
v. Sadu Chiru Waterfall in the foothills of Bishnupur District is the new tourist hot spot of Manipur and needs to be developed as a preferred eco-tourism destination.
vi. Nature tourism centred on villages, coupled with ‘Homestay Concept', shall be promoted as an important tourism product of Manipur to spread tourism and its socio-economic benefits to rural areas.
vii. The objectives of promoting Nature Eco-Tourism shall be realized by:
a. Conservation of biological diversity through ecosystem protection.
b. Promotion of sustainable use of biodiversity, by providing jobs to local populations.
c. Sharing of socio-economic benefits with local communities and indigenous peoples by having their informed consent and participation in the management of eco-tourism enterprises.
d. Tourism to preserve and protect natural resources, with minimal impact on the environment through regulation of visitors as per the carrying capacity and Acts, Rules and guidelines in force.
e. Minimization of tourism's own environmental impact.
f. Affordability of eco-tourism facilities.
g. Local culture, flora and fauna to be the main attractions.
5.2 CULTURE TOURISM
i. Manipur is uniquely rich in its culture and heritage of the people. The Government shall
endeavour to develop, enrich and promote various forms of the cultural heritage which shall
essentially include:
a. Various Exotic Dances of the State viz., Raas Leela, Khamba-Thoibi Dance, Pung Cholom, Maibi Dance, Nupi Pala, Nupa Pala, Lai Haraoba Dance, and various tribal dances like the Kabui Dances, Kuki Thadou Dance forms, Bamboo Dance, Naga Dances and other adapted dances.
b. Indigenous Sports like Sagol Kangjei (Polo), Thang-Ta, Sarit Sarak, Yubi Lakpi, Hiyang Tanaba, Mukna, Kang Sanaba, Arambai, etc.
c. Indigenous Festivals and Fairs namely Yaoshang (Holi) and Thabal Chongba, Kang (RathYatra), Ningol Chakouba, Cheiraoba, Heikru-Hitongba, Gang-Ngai, Kut, Lui-Ngai- Ni, Chumpha, Orange Festival, Pineapple Festival, etc.
d. Indigenous Music includes Khullong Eshei, Pena Eshei, Khubak Eshei, Nat, etc.
e. Indigenous Cuisines
f. Fine Arts, Handloom and Handicrafts.
g. Manipur Sangai Festival held annually from 21st to 30th November.
ii. Integrated development of areas around cultural and heritage sites.
5.3 MEDICAL TOURISM
Patients prefer to travel for treatment for various reasons viz., inaccessibility to good medical facilities and hospitals, long waiting time to undergo a surgery/treatment, leisure, vacation or convenient element during travel, etc. and diasporas seeking treatment back in their native land. The healthcare system of a land should essentially fulfill criteria like better nursing facilities, faster
personalized services, cutting edge technology and lower cost of treatment to cater to the visiting patient-tourists.
Manipur today has the requisite medical expertise, equipments and professionals to fulfill these criteria. Immediate demand for medical tourism can be seen from neighbouring States like Mizoram and Nagaland, and also from neighbouring countries with underdeveloped facilities like Myanmar, Laos and Vietnam. Therefore, medical tourism is identified and proposed to be developed and nurtured into a niche tourism product of the State and a comprehensive plan shall be drawn-up to encourage investors, entrepreneurs and healthcare professionals to boost medical tourism in Manipur. This form of tourism would also contribute to the overall tourism economy creating direct and indirect employment opportunities, enhancing income and improving the general healthcare quality of the State. Furthermore, it is intended to entice the visiting tourists, who come to admire the beauty of the Loktak Lake or enjoy the exquisiteness of the natural flora & fauna, to have a 'health' purpose to their vacation as well. Thus, 'Medical Tourism'in Manipur shall ultimately seek to combine travel, tourism, leisure and treatment.
Strategic Action Plans that need to be taken-up to develop medical tourism in Manipur are as follows:
i. The Government shall endeavour to accord ''Industry Status' to the Accredited Healthcare Facilities in the State under the NEIIPP-2007.
ii. Identification and accreditation by NABH (National Accreditation Board of Hospitals and Healthcare providers), Joint Commission International (JCI) or ISO 9001:2000, which is the generic standard for Quality Management System across the world, of healthcare facilities is essential to improve the quality of services as well as to receive admissible support from the Government. In addition, a Tourism Advisory Committee be constituted which could act as the accreditation body of the Government, setting the benchmark for quality and deeming a Healthcare Facility as a 'Tourism Unit'.
iii. A healthcare facility which has a track record of service and catering to domestic and foreign patient-tourists shall be deemed as a 'tourism unit' and get all admissible incentives accordingly from the Government.
iv. Investment in the health sector through establishment of hospitals offering primary, secondary and tertiary level health care facilities including medical educational institute and allied services like pharmacies, diagnostics, pathological laboratories, training and skill development for para-medical services shall be given maximal priority.
v. Linked Departments and Agencies shall make earnest efforts to construct, improve and maintain star accommodation facilities, approach roads, power and water supply, garbage and bio-medical waste disposal, gas plants and patient-tourists facilitation at or near the healthcare facilities.
vi. Allopathy including diagnostic sciences, Naturopathy, Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha, Homeopathy, Yoga and traditional medicine are the identified areas for promotion of medical tourism in the State.
vii. The use of Information Technology and other IT enabled services shall be paramount in the game-plan of the Government in promoting healthcare tourism in Manipur.
viii. Several important players in the medical tourism sector are identified such as doctors, tour operators, hotels, hospitals and insurance agencies. A perfect coordination between all these players is absolutely essential to develop this sector into a booming business. While doctors play a key role in spreading the word about the medical services available in Manipur during their visits outside the State and abroad, medical tour operators or travel facilitators actually arrange the tours for interested parties and liaise with insurance companies. These facilitators shall be groomed and encouraged to have tie-ups with the doctors, hospitals, hotels and insurance agencies within and outside Manipur.
ix. Med Tour Pal, India Medical Tourism, Medical Tourism Corporation, Health Base, etc. are some reputed national and international medical tourism facilitator companies. The Government shall introduce new schemes and policies to approve and tie up with these companies and other local medical tourism service facilitators in coordination with the healthcare providers for a proper direction in boosting medical tourism in Manipur.
x. Participation in conferences in key markets shall be encouraged to forge networking with domestic and global health facilitators and insurance companies and referral points.
xi. Reputed doctors, who are essentially well known inside and outside the State, may be selected and appointed as brand ambassadors to promote and establish trust of patient- tourists coming to Manipur for treatment purposes.
xii. Public Private Community Partnership (PPCP) shall be encouraged to develop and promote medical tourism in the State.
xiii. Healthcare Visa is an important issue which needs to be taken-up urgently with the Government of India to facilitate easy, hassle-free and friendly approach to foreign patient- tourists coming to Manipur especially from Myanmar for availing medical facilities. At present, citizens of Myanmar cannot visit the State beyond the mandatory 16 Kms without further clearances and permits. Further steps are therefore required to modify the relaxation of RAP/PAP so that these tourists can fully explore freely the land and avail medical facilities. This will also boost the Indo-Myanmar Border Trade to a great extent. Visas may be issued only to patient-tourists booked with a local licensed tour/medical service operator.
5.4 ADVENTURE TOURISM
i. The Government would seek to explore and develop the adventure eco-tourism focusing on the following:
a. Loktak Lake for Water Sports.
b. Dzuko Valley located in Senapati District.
c. Hill and its 'LHy'and Kangkhui Cave Trekking in Ukhrul district.
d. Bunning Meadow, Zeilad Lake, Barak Waterfalls, Khoupum Water Falls, Kicha Hill and Tharon Cave in Tamenglong district.
e. Parasailing & Paragliding at Koirengei Old Airfield, Chingnungkok of Imphal East District and Rafting at Barak River. Canoeing, Kayaking and Rowing are also conducted at Loukoipat, Takmu, Phubala and Komlakhong areas of Loktak Lake.
ii. Regulations and certification for adventure tourism operators will be introduced so that the minimum standards of safety and conservation are met.
iii. National Level Guidelines for Adventure Tour Operators to be adopted.
iv. Use of latest technologies like GPS, Satellite phones, etc. to be encouraged for adventure tour operators recognised by the Government for client safety.
v. Insurance schemes shall be introduced for adventure tourists.
vi. Introduction of training courses for adventure guides and adventure tourism subjects in the proposed Institute of Hotel Management at Imphal.
vii. The Government shall work in tandem with certified and licensed organizations, agencies and NGOs like the Manipur Mountaineering and Trekking Association, etc. for developing and promoting a sustainable adventure tourism industry in Manipur.
5.5 OTHERS
i. MICE Tourism
a. Meetings, Incentives, Conventions and Exhibitions (MICE) shall be encouraged to capitalise on the seasonal trends of nature tourism.
b. Facilitate setting-up of Convention Centres in the State for development of MICE Tourism.
c. Creation of a database of scientific, technical, medical associations, convention centres, and convention services.
d. Training manpower specifically for the MICE industry.
ii. Shopping shall be recognized and developed as an integral part of tourism. The development of dedicated shopping centres for traditional handloom and handicrafts designated along the lines of village Haats like 'Dilli Haat' and 'Shilpgram' shall be encouraged and information on where to procure specific items made available through shopping guides and websites.
iii. Special attention to popularize the unmatched variety of local Cuisines. It is proposed to create a highly skilled workforce of indigenous culinary professionals through innovative incentive scheme.
iv. Imphal shall be positioned as the Cultural Capital of Manipur supported by an ongoing and vibrant calendar of cultural events.
v. Domestic tourism in India is mainly pilgrimage related and Manipur should take advantage of this opportunity. Travel facilities as well as facilities at Pilgrimage Centres need to be strengthened and made more tourist-friendly. Pilgrimage Centres may be identified and integrated with new domestic tourist circuits wherein transport, accommodation, catering, and pilgrimage are all synergized to make pilgrimage tourism into a popular and comfortable mode.
vi. Historical sites like INA Complex, Mo/rang; Japanese War Memorial, Maibam Lokpa Ching; War Cemeteries, Imphal; Baruni; Koubru; Kaina, etc. may be promoted. Similarly, heritage sites like Kang I a Fort, Imphal; Govindajee Tempie-Wangkhei-Ningthem Pukhri-Ramjee Temple Complex would be developed and promoted.
5.6 COMMUNITY TOURISM
Any Tourism Policy needs to be committed towards enhancing community-based tourism, which is all about sharing the local natural resources with the world. By doing this, State can reap sustainable benefits and conserve the natural environment.


6
ACTION PLAN
The following is a list of action points emerging from the Manipur Tourism Policy, 2014 indicating the Ministries/Departments/Agencies responsible for implementing these actions:
6.1 Action points relating to Facilities
a. Nature Interpretation centre
A separate Nature Interpretation centre may be set-up to educate people including tourists about the richness of biodiversity of the State, Acts, Rules and Guidelines of Ecotourism and also to inspire a sense of appreciation and understanding value of nature.
b. Tourist Interpretation Centre at Imphal
Setting-up of Tourist Interpretation Centre as one stop tourist reception centre to cater to various needs of travelers, foreign as well as domestic and offer air and train reservations, money changing counters and information about all tourist centres with e-connectivity and networking facilities to all State tourist offices.
[Action: Tourism and Art & Culture Department]
c. Augmentation of Air Seat Capacity
• Assessing sector wise and season wise air seat capacity, and load factors and augmentation of capacity in the critical sectors by the National Airlines.
• Improvement of accessibility in State. Special attention would be given to areas having important tourist centres which are not connected by trains/buses. Promoting arrivals in destination of interest by creating hub and spoke operations. Giving impetus to Heli Tourism and Helicopter services to areas not serviceable by fixed wing aircraft.
• Construction of airport/helipads on Built-Operate-Transfer (BOT) through private sector participation.
• Up-gradation of Imphal Airport as an International Airport.
[Action: Ministry of Civil Aviation]
d. Rail Services
• Introducing tourist trains. Special funds need to be earmarked for this purpose.
• Improving hygienic conditions, environment and passenger facilities in and around Railway Stations serving important tourist centers.
• Construction of budget hotels at important railway nodes.
[Action: Ministry of Railways]
e. Road Network
• Development of public transport infrastructures like bus terminals, parking yards equipped with public conveniences and hygienic eating joints are developed at important tourist destinations, besides improving the roads.PWD wouldstrivetoprovide seamless road connectivity to major tourist spots.
• The State Transport Authority Manipur may also consider grant of contract carriage permits in respect of intermediate public transport vehicles for enhancing connectivity in between important tourist destinations with District Headquarters/Sub-Divisional Headquarters of the State.
• Providing wayside amenities along with filling stations at a distance of about 60 kilometers on all the highways connecting important tourist centers.
• Providing standard signage's on all roads leading to tourist spots.
• Ensuring uninterrupted inter-state movement of tourist coaches and vehicles through rationalisation and single point collection of taxes.
[Action: Ministry of Road Transport & Highways + State PWD + Transport Department]
f. Maintenance of Heritage Sites and Improvement of Tourist Facilities
• Ensuring proper maintenance and professional site management of important tourist attractions/monuments under the control of Archaeological Survey of India/State Archaeology Department.
• Involving local authorities, trusts, etc. in the restoration/preservation of tourist attractions and maintenance of the surroundings.
• Providing world class tourist facilities, amenities and landscaping of area around important monuments in a phased manner.
• Identification, documentation and video publishing of all the monuments which are great tourist attractions.
[Action: Archeological Survey of India and Art & Culture Department]
g. General Improvement of Tourist Facilities
• Computerisation of the system of issue of Visas by the Embassies/High Commissions.
• Introduction of issue of Visas on arrival atleast for 15 days at the airport and at India- Myanmar border at Moreh.
• Distribution of tourist information brochures through Indian Embassies/High Commissions.
• Streamlining of luggage handling systems at the airports to ensure that the luggage is transported and cleared within 30 minutes after the arrival of the flights.
• Improving tourist facilitation services at the airports by adopting technological solutions and imparting training to functionaries at the cutting edge level like customs and immigration officials, taxi drivers, guides, etc.
• Introduction of air-conditioned taxis with electronic fare meters at the airports.
• Provision of special taxi and coach enclosures extending from arrival halls at the airport and controlled by security staff so that passengers can queue up easily and pick-up taxis and coaches without hassles.
• Mounting Video-Cameras in strategic places inside and outside arrival areas to prevent corruption and for security purpose.
• Augmenting information services at the airports.
• Removal of PAP restrictions.
• Provision of money changing facility in all the tourist centers.
• Providing international standard signages at tourist centers, airports, railway stations, bus stands, etc.
[Action: Ministry of Home Affairs, Ministry of External Affairs, Ministry of Civil Aviation, Ministry of
Finance (Department of Financial Services) and State Government]
6.2 Action Points relating to Information
• It is imperative and pertinent to have a proper public information system both online and offline with specific reference to tourist information system pertaining to availability of public transport/intermediate public transport system having link with respective information for important parking places/halting stations/terminal points, distance between place of origin and destination, rate of fare, mode of transport and duration of journey etc.
• Setting-up a chain of exclusive souvenir shops stocking specially manufactured and beautifully packed information books and other souvenir items at important tourist places in a professional manner.
• Introduction of audio-guides at the important tourist places on a commercial basis.
• There have been revolutionary changes in the computer and communication technologies and other relevant sectors, which are still changing. Such technologies have helped sharing of information globally to the advantage of all. Information Technology for improving visitor information and facilitation should be effectively used. Setting-up of Touch Screen Information Kiosks, development of Tourism Portals with links to all tourism related web sites, production of CD-ROMs, creation and maintenance of websites, introduction of computer based information and reservation systems, use of virtual reality systems and video-conferencing for tourism promotion, etc. are the activities proposed in this regard.
[Action: Tourism, Information Technology and Art & Culture Department]
6.3 Action Points relating to Safety and Security
• Launching of campaigns through local bodies, non-governmental organisations, youth centres, etc. to create awareness about the traditions of Manipuri hospitality and the importance of providing an assurance of safety and security to tourists so as to control touting, extortion and harassment to tourists.
• Providing a separate legal framework for the protection of tourists and their belongings may not be necessary and rather the existing laws needs to be enforced and police would have to take preventive steps to ensure safety and security of tourists.
• Providing an institutional mechanism to deal with the complaints received from tourists and the industry so as to create a better security perception amongst actual and potential visitors. This could be done after official announcement of tourist spots in the State, if necessary, Police Outposts/ Tourist Booths may be set-up under the control of the concerned Police Stations and District SPs.
• Introducing tourist police at important tourist centres. Necessary infrastructure and equipment would be provided by the State Government fort he identified Police Outposts/ Tourist Booths and the personnel deployed given specialized training.
• Strict prohibition of soliciting and enticing of tourists both within the airport premises and in its immediate neighbourhood by unethical operators and traders and keeping both the airports and its vicinity tout free.
• State Government to enact suitable legislations on travel trade/tourist police for protection and security of tourists.
[Action: Ministry of Tourism, Ministry of Home Affairs and State Government]
6.4 Action Point relating to Infrastructure Development
• In order to off-set the specific constraints of tourism industry and to put in place the required infrastructure as quickly as possible, particularly in less developed areas, appropriate incentive schemes would be considered. It would also be the endeavour of the State Government to rationalize taxes and to allocate suitable land for tourism purposes at reasonable prices, harmonize movement of tourist transport across State borders, etc.
• Efforts will be made to prepare Master Plan for land use in each tourist destination/urban centre for infrastructure purposes. Tourism and Art & Culture Departments would be associated to effect any changes in the Master Plan relating to land use for tourism infrastructure.
• It will be the endeavour of the Government to provide single window clearance facilities in the areas like allotment of lands, environment, electricity, water, sewerage, etc. in order to facilitate speedy implementation of tourism projects.
[Action: Tourism, Art & Culture, Revenue, MAHUD and Town Planning Departments]
• Development of tourism to the extent desired would involve heavy investments in infrastructure. The resources for such investments have to come mostly from private investors, financial institutions and external borrowing. Financial viability and commercial returns are the guiding factors in such investments. Very often, it would depend on investments to bridge certain critical gaps in infrastructure which by itself may not be commercially remunerative. Special funds have to be, therefore, created for such investments. The institutions like Tourism Finance Corporation of India (TFCI) may be approached and a special fund namely Tourism Development Fund may be set up for development of Tourist Infrastructure. In case State Plan funding is involved, Planning Department would be consulted.
[Action: Tourism & Finance Department]
6.5 Action Point relating to Cooperation
• Encouraging Panchayati Raj Institutions, local bodies, religious trusts, co-operatives, and other community level institutions to take-up tourism promotion activities through the general rural development and employment generation programmes and specific rural tourism development schemes.
• Encouragement of non-governmental organisations to create and manage tourist facilities.
• Involvement of non-governmental organisations to create environmental awareness on Eco-tourism, national parks and urban/rural hygiene in tourist centres.
• Involvement of local community in the formulation and implementation of tourism development plans through District Tourism Promotion Councils, etc.
[Action: Tourism, MAHUD and RD & PR Departments]
6.6 Action Point relating to Conservation
• Formulation and publication of appropriate policies and guidelines, creation of public awareness about such guidelines, etc. are the activities envisaged in this regard apart from providing the requisite legal frame work for ensuring social, cultural and environmental sustainability.
• Destroying of natural environment, archaeological monuments, mountains and places of natural beauty; disruption in the eco-system of environmentally sensitive regions; destruction of traditions in the culturally sensitive areas; clandestine selling of antiques,bio- piracy of endemic floral and faunal species and vandalism are some of the possible adverse effects of unimaginative and unregulated development of tourism.
[Action: Tourism, Art & Culture, Forest, Environment & Ecology Department]
6.7 Action Point relating to Product Development and Promotion
• Giving guidance and financial assistance for preparing tourism Master Plans and perspective plans identifying tourism resources, prioritising development circuits and projects and specifying the most suitable forms of tourism.
• Implementing integrated/intensive development of tourist destinations after assessing the carrying capacity, local aspirations and the benefits likely to accrue to the community.
• Involving the Town and Planning Department and integration of spatial-economic development plans with tourism development.
• Focusing on the development of Eco-tourism.
• Developing the places of pilgrimage by providing the requisite infrastructural facilities with a view to promote domestic and international pilgrim tourism.
• Develop a clear identity/theme around some important existing attractions and package them to offer an attractive product.
• Expand 'Events Tourism' through organization of events such as sports, conferences etc.; also market existing cultural and religious festivals as tourist attractions.
• Expand 'Shopping Tourism' through good value for money with the exquisite range of hand-crafted products made in the State.
• Develop 'Lake Cruise Tourism' at Loktak Lake.
• Developing heritage and village tourism as a package by identifying and developing villages around heritage properties, which have already been restored.
• Diversifying the tourism product to make Manipur an unique multi-attraction tourism destination which can meet the needs of all forms of tourism particularly rural tourism, eco¬tourism, adventure tourism, incentive tourism, conference and convention tourism, etc.
• Developing natural health resorts.
• Developing seamless inter-modal transfers by improving linkages.
• Amusement parks promote tourism by attracting both international and domestic tourists, generate demand in the transport, accommodation and service sectors and create employment opportunities. The State Government will prepare appropriate guidelines to encourage private sector to invest in development of amusement parks.
[Action: Tourism and Art & Culture Department]
• People's Participation in Development of Tourism: The approach for the future development of tourism has to take into account both the needs for selective development and the demands of a wide cross section of domestic tourists. The activities in this regard would include:
i. Creating public awareness about economic and social benefits of tourism amongst administrators, planners and the masses through seminars, workshops, presentations, etc.
ii. Launching entrepreneurship development and self-employment programmes to involve the educated youth in providing various tourist facilities and services and thereby creating employment opportunities.
iii. Integrated development of special tourism areas and selected circuits.
[Action: Tourism, Commerce & Industries and Labour& Employment Department]
• Integrated Development of Tourist destinations: Tourist traffic to the State is largely confined to certain selected centres and destinations at present. There is also a fair level of seasonality in the tourist arrivals. The choice of new destinations for development will have to be based on their intrinsic attractions, potential for development and the carrying capacity as well as availability of resources. Such development will be guided by well- conceived master plans, and executed by specific Tourism Development Authorities. Adequate backward and forward linkages will also be established to ensure adequate flow of benefits to the local community.
• Creation of Tourism Economic Zones.
• Constitution of Tourism Development Authorities/ Committees.
[Action: Tourism Department]
• Diversification of Tourism Products: The main strength of Manipur tourism at present is its cultural attractions, particularly, the monuments and archaeological remains, its art, handloom & handicrafts and colourful fairs & festivals. The State is also endowed with a number of other tourist attractions and options including forests, wild life and landscapes for eco-tourism; mountain peaks for adventure tourism; heritage sites for heritage tourism; etc There are also facilities for conference and convention tourism, Lake Cruise tourism and shopping tours. Development of natural health resorts of Yoga, Ayurveda etc. along with rural tourism, adventure tourism and eco-tourism may be given adequate attention.
[Action: Tourism Department]
• Sustainable Development of Tourism: Assessment of Carrying Capacity and Environment Impact Assessment studies would be insisted while developing tourism in ecologically fragile areas and all developmental activities will be guided by such studies. The other activities in this regard would include:
i. Providing a legal frame work through appropriate legislation for ensuring social, cultural and environmental sustainability of tourism development and protecting the tourists.
ii. Evolving specific policies and guidelines for the development of specific forms of tourism like eco-tourism, adventure tourism, etc.
[Action: Tourism and Forest & Environment Departments]
6.8 Action Points relating to Promotion and Marketing
• Achieving effective co-ordination and synergy with other Departments, agencies and the private sector in tourism promotion and marketing.
• Fully utilising the Indian Missions abroad for tourism promotion and related activities.
• Identifying potential tourism markets and segments and adopting focused marketing strategies based on research to make promotional and marketing efforts cost effective.
• Enhancing the image of Manipur as a fascinating multi-attraction and multi-activity destination with rich cultural heritage and a vibrant society.
• Organizing photo exhibitions and creation of a photo library.
• Launching of a multi-media CD-ROM and creating an integrated website on Manipur tourism.
• Developing a clear identity of Manipur Tourism product by promoting selected theme based tourist attractions.
[Action: Tourism and Art & Culture Departments]
6.9 Action Points relating to International Cooperation
• Ensuring active participation in the activities of international agencies like United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Economic and Social Commission for Asia and Pacific (ESCAP), World Tourism Organization (WTO), Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA), Indian Ocean Tourism Organization (IOTO).
• Enhancing multilateral co-operation in tourism with different groups of countries like Association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN), Bangladesh-India-Myanmar-Sri Lanka- Thailand-Economic Co-operation (BIMSTEC), South Asian Association for Regional Co¬operation (SAARC), etc.
• Strengthening tourism promotion and investment through multilateral and bilateral agreements.
[Action: Tourism Department] 
6.10 Action points relating to the Economic and Social Benefits
• Standardization of statistical definitions and methods of data collection, tabulation and dissemination.
• Strengthening of statistical machinery and improvement of statistical systems on tourism.
• Development of Tourism Satellite Accounts in association with the Department of Economics & Statistics to estimate the economic benefits of tourism precisely and regularly.
• Undertaking tourism impact assessment studies and case studies.
• Launching of tourism awareness campaigns at all levels of society.
[Action: Tourism and Economics & Statistics Departments]
6.11 Action Points Relating to Professional Excellence
• Strengthening the institutional set-up for human resource development including the setting-up of an Advanced Institute of Hotel Management and a Culinary Institute.
• Qualitative improvement and modernization of existing training institutions.
• Setting-up atleast one Food Craft Institute.
• Improving the standards of training in private institutes through accreditation and quality control.
• Setting-up a Manipur Tourism Documentation Centre equipped with modern technology to function as a repository of research findings and publications on tourism.
• Involving the tourism industry in human resource development activities and encouraging them to set-up independent training facilities.
• Streamlining and strengthening of guide training and training of other grass root level workers.
• Introduction of optional courses in tourism related topics at Graduate and Under Graduate levels in order to meet requirement of trained personnel in this sector.
6.12 Action Points Relating to Clash of Policy
• Whenever and wherever there is a clash of policy between Tourism Policy and other Government policies it shall be brought to the 'Cabinet’ for a decision. 
7
STRATEGY FOR IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTION PLAN
& PROMOTION OF THRUST AREAS
Tourism, as a multi-sectoral industry, involves complex and close relationship with various interlinked departments, agencies, organizations and service providers. A systematic, planned approach is necessary to optimally allocate/utilize limited resources to sensitize and guide all these stakeholders on a common, shared vision which is very essential for a highly efficient, responsive tourism industry. The multiplier effects and benefits of tourism can thus percolate to all stakeholders and the people.
The overall vision of the development of tourism in Manipur embodied in this policy is endeavoured to be achieved through five key strategic objectives viz., positioning tourism as a State priority, enhancing Manipur's competitiveness as a tourist destination, improving and expanding tourism product development, creation of world class infrastructure and effective marketing plans and programmes. Thus, the strategies and action plans to be adopted to fulfil the dream of making Manipur a 'tourism hotspotf\n the coming years are underlined as follow:
7.1 PRIORITIZATION OF DESTINATIONS & INFRASTRUCTURE
Quality infrastructure is essential for developing tourist products and for providing better services to both domestic and international tourists. Creation of tourism infrastructure would have favourable impact on overall economic growth, employment generation and on the preservation of art, culture, and heritage. Tourism projects like destination development are capital intensive, commercially unviable, and require financial support from the government. At the same time, it is necessary that such infrastructure is created with professional expertise of architects/landscaping experts and is then privately managed through a transparent process. Large revenue projects such as setting-up of hotels, convention centres, golf courses, etc., normally have substantial gestation periods. These facilities need to be created by private initiative with the government acting as a facilitator and catalyst.
Prioritization of projects is absolutely necessary to put scarce resources to best use. The need of the hour is to create a few success stories and the momentum & dynamics of the tourism industry is expected to take over. Tourism in Manipur is proposed to be developed in a focused and phased manner to create Special Tourist Zones/Clusters based on the tourism index of scenery, accessibility, accommodation and safety. Infrastructure projects shall be implemented in an integrated, time-bound and cost-effective manner and further maintained in an orderly fashion.
i. Phase - I (2014 to 2017): The first phase shall include infrastructure development for accommodation facilities at Imphal City and surrounding areas, beautification and commercial avenues at Moreh Town, and beautification and accommodation facilities at Loktak Lake Complex especially at the Sendra Island.
a. Imphal City is the main entry point of tourists to Manipur. Since proper roadways and railways have not yet been effectively developed, air travel is the preferred mode of
transportation of tourists to the State. Air travel needs to be further strengthened along with improvement of roads and introduction of railways.
b. Lack of standard accommodation facilities in Imphal City has been a major hindrance to the growth of tourism in Manipur. Up-gradation of existing tourism infrastructure and infusion of fresh facilities in Imphal City and surrounding areas shall, therefore, be pursued. All measures shall be adopted to build only star category hotels and facilities. The makeover of Hotel Imphal to a five star category hotel is an endeavour in this particular direction. Infrastructure development shall also include ^construction, renovation and maintenance of parks, monuments, museums, zoo, public conveniences, parking structures, etc. Moreover, shopping complexes, trade centres, emporiums, leisure & entertainment multiplexes, art& culture centres, amusement parks on the line of 'DilliHaat' and adventure complexes shall be developed.
c. More funds could be thrust into ensuring better development of the historical Kangla Fort, as a significant measure to attract tourists, which at present is currently under development, and may be made open to public on Wednesdays too. The Govindaji Temple, Bhagyachandra Open Air Theatre (BOAT), Commonwealth War Cemeteries and Khongampat Orchidarium are other important places which should be nurtured for tourist interest.
d. There is a keen interest of tourists arriving in Manipur to visit Moreh Town. In view of India's Look East Policy and the Trans-Asian Highways and Railways, Moreh Town assumes a great importance and a strategic advantage to the growth of tourism in Manipur. Furthermore, this border town is deemed to become an unique entry point to Manipur and India for the people of South-East Asian countries, once there is equilibrium of trade and services between the neighbouring nations. The Government would take advantage of this opportunity and beautify and develop Moreh Town into a 'Commercial Hub. Star category hotels and other accommodation facilities, trade centres, leisure avenues and beautification of Moreh Town shall be taken-up earnestly.
e. Loktak Lake Complex including the floating Keibul Lamjao National Park (KLNP), the INA Complex and the Sendra Island constitute an unique feature that is rare in the world. This 'Complex' shall be developed, beautified and accommodation facilities shall be constructed with vigour to make it a major nature tourism attraction. Star category resorts, time share resorts, stand alone catering units & restaurants, spas, yoga centres, hobby-fishing facilities, outdoor nature facilities viz., house boats, floating restaurants, etc. shall be developed with a planned, environmental friendly approach. Water sports like canoeing, kayaking, boat rides and safaris to the National Park shall be organized and promoted.
f. Homestay concept would be promoted in a planned manner, especially in the interior areas for providing an unique experience to the visiting tourists.
g. The existing tourism infrastructure as well as the ones which are coming-up/would come-up, be managed on Public Private Partnership (PPP) and a suitable policy for Sub¬Letting of Tourism Infrastructure/Assets on PPP basis would be evolved by the Government. The selection of the license/ lessee would be made by fair and transparent
procedure and the rate of royalty/ lease fee to be received by the Government would be decided in consultation with Finance Department.
h. Under the existing law, no new structures can be constructed within 100 meters of protected monuments and this need to be kept in mind while developing and improving such protected monuments for tourism purposes
ii. Phase - II (2018 to 2021): The second phase will try to cover and establish Hill Stations at Tamenglong and Ukhrul Districts. In addition, the Lamdan Adventure Tourism Complex, Churachandpur District and the Dzuko Valley in Senapati District shall be developed into a world class adventure avenue and camping sites. Moreover, distinct war memorial sites and heritage places shall be identified and developed for pilgrimage and culture tourisms.
iii. Phase - III (2022 to 2025): The third phase will try to identify and develop potential tourism sites all over the State. This will essentially include intense development of rural tourism industry and ethnic living in places like Nambol, Lamdan, Tamei, , etc.
iv. The proposed Phase-I, II & III would be adequately dovetailed with the tourism development which may be taken-up at the time of implementation of Integrated Tourism Plan for the North-Eastern Master Plan for the North-Eastern region which has been prepared by M/S Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) under NEC/DoNER and in consultation with the Ministry of Tourism.
v. Simultaneously, infrastructure augmentation like way-site facilities, lodges, rest houses, etc. at identified tourist circuits/destinations focussing on these prioritized mega destinations shall be taken-up.
vi. Convergence shall be followed with mega projects and industries like the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM), Civil Aviation, Road Transport & Highways, Railways, Food Processing Industries, etc. The approach for large infrastructure development would thus be based on integrated development of tourism. This initiative addresses the 12th Plan challenge of Managing Urbanization.
vii. Planning for infrastructure development should adhere to the concept of last mile connectivity for electricity, water supply, approach roads, waste disposal, sanitation, etc. The 'last mile connectivity' shall also be proposed to be lengthened to 30-40 Kms.
viii. Introduction of contemporary international measures/standards for the hospitality sector by constant review of policies/guidelines.
ix. Different measures to be taken-up against high cost and low availability of land hampering growth of hotels.
x. The physical infrastructure for tourism includes accommodation units, roads, power, water supply, sewerage and telecommunication. This underscores the need for inter-sectoral convergence of infrastructural schemes and programmes that could support tourist destinations. The Government would create world class infrastructure meeting all the essential criteria to cater to both domestic and foreign tourists.
7.2 SPRUCING-UP OF IMPHAL CITY & OTHER MAJOR TOURIST DESTINATIONS:
i. Imphal, the Capital City of Manipur, is in need of urgent up-gradation of its existing infrastructure. Somehow or other, the first look at the City does not give positive impression to the visitors. Right from the airport upto all major points in the City, we see most of the properties are un-plastered with steel bars jutting-out from the pillars. In fact, one does not get a feel of passing through the City.
ii. The other tourist attraction at Sendra-Lokak-Moirang and Moreh border town are no different and situation there even worse.
iii. The historic Khwairamband Nupi Keithel No. 1, 2 & 3 (popularly known as 'Ima Market) which are all run by women vendors and have been reconstructed recently with Government of India's assistance are in the condition of disrepair. The basements and the first floor of these markets remain un-occupied/unused. These 3 (three) markets have not been repaired after inauguration and do not give a good sight to the visitors. Further, many of the lights are not functional and efficient system for Solid Waste disposal is missing.
iv. To overcome these major deficiencies, the Government would take proactive actions to make Imphal City impressive and vibrant by taking the following steps:
a. The Government would lay down policy/instructions mandating the owners of all the properties on the major roads e.g. from Airport to Andro Parking, Mantripukhri to Manipur University, Palace Compound to Hapta, all buildings in Thangal Bazar, Paona Bazar and adjoining area, B. T. Road (from Kangla Fort to Uripok) and other connecting roads to plaster exteriors of their properties, remove hanging steel iron rods and paint the exteriors as well as their roof tops to provide a good look and urban face to the City.
b. The Government would takes urgent steps for efficient collection of Solid Wastes from house to house and its proper disposal, if needed by involving NGOs/PPP mode.
c. All street lights should be made functional in Imphal city and high mast illuminations should be installed at key locations.
d. Efforts should be made to improve law & order situation and keep the shops and other establishments opened upto 9:00 PM in summer and upto 8:00 PM in winter. This would provide free movement & avenues to explore in the evening to the visitors.
e. Khwairamband Nupi Keithel No. 1, 2 & 3 should be immediately repaired and renovated. Further, to make these markets lively and a major tourist attraction, it is suggested that the Government would consider providing all women's run facilities viz. State Cottage Industries Emporium, Bank, Cafeteria, Musical Show/Performances, IT establishment and other activities without creating any conflict of interest with existing vendors occupying the ground floor.
f. Providing appropriate signages at different location, up-gradation of foot paths and drains, comprehensive repairs of all the city roads etc.
g. The Government would take-up comprehensive development of River Fronts along the bank of the 3 (three) major rivers flowing through Greater Imphal Area i.e. Imphal River, Nambul River and Kongba River and try to adopt eco-friendly technology and developed these as 'Living Rivers' with a balanced mix of greeneries and infrastructure to be created for the purpose.
v. Similar actions would be taken by the Government to upgrade the Urban Infrastructure at Sendra - Loktak - Moirang as well as Moreh Town at Indo-Myanmar border.
7.3 HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT & CAPACITY BUILDING
i. Tourism Sector in the Manipur shall prepare itself to meet an exponential demand for the workforce at managerial, supervisory, skilled and semi-skill levels. This increase in growth will have a direct impact on the demand and supply mismatch for providing satisfactory service to visiting tourists.
ii. Human Resource Development for the hospitality sector and capacity building for the service providers are absolutely essential for the growth of tourism industry. The Government shall strive for excellence in the tourism sector by ensuring availability of trained manpower. Regular interactions and meetings with various stakeholders to maintain a continuous flow of ideas and taking new/corrective measures to perform its task efficiently shall be taken-up. Knowledge and capabilities of the officers and staffs shall be enhanced by refresher training programmes, deputing them to national and international seminars/workshops on new areas of tourism development site, visits to successful tourism spots, learning from the best practices around the world, etc.
iii. Workshops to assimilate success stories and do an in-depth analysis would be conducted regularly. Training and professional education with necessary infrastructural support for generating manpower to meet the needs of tourism hospitality industry, both quantitatively and qualitatively and to put in place a system for the same, to provide In-service Training/Up-gradation to the existing service providers. Guides to be inducted and regular training programmes/refresher courses/workshops organized to ensure that guides remain updated. Skill testing and certification of existing service providers as well as enhancing the skills of the stakeholders in private and community would be undertaken.
iv. Professional education system in the field of Tourism by introducing tourism related regular courses such as Bachelors in Tourism Studies, Post-Graduate in Tourism Studies and Ph.D. in Tourism Studies at University level. Also, short duration and diploma courses in hospitality and travel-tourism programmes shall be conducted through the upcoming Institute of Hospitality Management (IHM). Scholarship programmes would be introduced for Tourism allied subjects and specialized courses in the Hospitality sector in other State Universities and Colleges to bring academic excellence and to encourage research activities in these fields. The Government shall endeavour to include tourism as a non-credit compulsory subject in the syllabi from Class-VIII to Class-X standard in the State. This will inculcate among the youths of the State a sense of our traditional hospitality and good mannerism for the development of tourism.
v. Tourism industry shall be managed as an enterprise with professional inputs at all levels. The Hospitality Sector in Manipur needs both extensive awareness of all communities and intensive capacity building of hotel staffs, tourist guides, drivers, cultural establishment and shopping centres. The Government seeks to put in place both long term and short term plans for Capacity Building in Hospitality Sector, not only in tools, techniques but also in changing perspectives, motivation and identity.
vi. Tourism Entrepreneurship Development (TED) and enhancing professional skills of front and field manpower are the areas which shall receive priority.
vii. Mobile training units for community service providers in rural areas identified for the development of rural tourism and home stay concepts.
viii. For the young untrained staffs who continue to join the industry, the Government should, through short-term training programmes, build capacities in order to provide quality service. A scheme is required to be mooted to examine and certify the large number of industry/conventional trained skilled manpower available in the State.
ix. Government of India's existing scheme of ‘Train the Trainer' shall be strengthened and implemented in the State for boosting availability of adequate trainers for training. Intensive Training of personnel in different sub-sectors of Hospitality Industry would be taken-up regularly under ‘Hunar-Se-Rozgar-TakYojna' as well as other schemes of the Government of India - both directly through IHM as well as in PPP Mode.
x. The training programmes must cover the skill development in general for fresh candidates, specialized skill development including language courses, for fresh as well as existing service providers, basic skill up-gradation in general for existing service providers, training of trainers programme, and creating awareness of tourism benefits/knowledge in urban and rural areas.
xi. As an important step in capacity building, a State Institute of Hotel Management, Catering and Applied Nutrition would be set-up in Imphal.
7.4 PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP (PPP)/PUBLIC PRIVATE COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP (PPCP)
In a number of developing countries, tourism partnerships between the Government, private sector and local communities are becoming a growing phenomenon especially as communities are increasingly gaining rights to wildlife and other valuable tourism assets on their land through policy changes on land tenure. In other cases, partnerships are developing on private land as tourism operators recognise that not only is local support essential for the long-term maintenance of the tourism assets on which the industry depends, but that many communities have cultural resources which can greatly enhance or diversify existing tourism products.
The strategic vision is to enhance the tourism potential of Manipur by integrated development of tourism infrastructure by taping tourism potential along key tourism circuits and leverage the sectoral & product development through Public Private Partnership (PPP)/Public Private Community Partnership (PPCP) to achieve sustainable and economic development. This partnership shall be based on the following objectives and principles:
i. The development of tourism in the State shall be based on a common shared vision involving a mutually beneficial and legally-binding contract among various stakeholders which shall include the Government, travel trade and hospitality sector, investors, venture capitalists, establishments and associations, scholars, domestic and foreign tourists, and the community. The partnership shall be focused on the provision of assets and the delivery of services by allocating responsibilities and business risks among the various partners. Emphasis shall be on promoting integrated development of tourism facilities on Public Private Partnership (PPP) /Public Private Community Partnership (PPCP) which may require creation of Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) to cover different aspects of Hospitality/Tourism Sector.
ii. A PPP/PPCP seeks to provide an opportunity to improve service delivery, improve cost- effectiveness, increase investment in public infrastructure, reduce public sector risk, deliver capital projects faster, improve budget certainty, make better use of assets and poverty alleviation. Community partnership, at times, is essential to generate purchasing power in the hands of the weaker sections of the society and lead to their empowerment and social inclusion.
iii. General guidelines for the partnership shall include identifying partnership opportunities, finding out about prospective partners, selecting partners, getting assistance, negotiating the financial and non-financial components, deciding on the duration of the partnership, formalizing the partnership, and monitoring, reviewing and amending the deal. The PPP/PPCP project cycle shall essentially cover the inception, preparation period, feasibility study, project term, procurement, signing of the PPP/PPCP agreement, development, delivery, exit, monitoring and review.
iv. The partnership shall contain transitional arrangements; service and financial obligations; obligations of private party, including its residual functions, and those of the Government regulatory body; provision for leasing charges, rate adjustments and dispute resolution; and other contract conditions. Transitional arrangements relating to transfer of employees, liabilities/revenues, accounts receivable, facilities, existing projects, cash and marketable securities would have to be defined. Service obligations should provide coverage and quality standards. Financial obligations include size of equity investments, bond and the various fees intended to free the Government from subsidizing, besides working out a Revenue Sharing Model.
v. The Government shall be actively involved throughout a project's life cycle from licensing, financing to regulation. The private sector shall be responsible for the commercial functions viz., project design, construction, finance, operations and management. In fact, risk transfer from the public to the private sector shall be a critical element of all partnerships. The goal is to combine the best capabilities of the public and private sectors for mutual benefit. Under this arrangement, the private sector partner is deemed to gain a relatively stable, long-term investment opportunity. On the other hand, private firms would also use their own strengths and abilities to add value to the arrangements by bringing in management efficiencies, innovation to offset risks and costs and by potentially increasing its values.
vi. Proceeding with a PPP/PPCP arrangement may be most appropriate when the following characteristics are available:
a. There is a significant opportunity for private sector innovation in design, construction, service delivery, or use of an asset involving the community;
b. Clearly definable and measurable output specifications can be established suitable for payment on a services delivered basis;
c. An opportunity exists for the private sector partner to generate non-government streams of revenue, to help offset public sector costs;
d. Some risks can be transferred to the private sector and the community;
e. Projects of a similar nature have been successfully developed using a similar method; and,
f. The private sector or/and community has sufficient capacity (expertise and availability) to successfully deliver project objectives.
vii. The Government shall endeavour to remove barriers to growth to leverage private sector investment and other issues related to conceptualization, funding pattern and implementation process and possible dovetailing with Ministry of Tourism's Large Revenue Generating Scheme (LRGS) &/or GOI's Viability Gap Funding Scheme. Proposals to be made under the Scheme may be considered for providing LRGS Subsidy &/or Viability Gap Funding (VGF), one time or deferred, with the objective and conditions of making a PPP/PPCP project commercially viable; delivering an infrastructure service on payment of user charges; the contract/concession is awarded in favour of a private sector company in which 51 percent or more of the subscribed and paid up equity is owned and controlled by a private entity; the private partner is selected on the basis of open competitive bidding and is responsible for financing, construction, maintenance and operation of the project during the concession period; and the project should provide a service against payment of a pre¬determined tariff or user charge.
viii. The modality of the PPP/PPCP may be on time-sharing basis, both in terms of period and rights of use to property, in which multiple parties may be managing a particular ‘Tourism Unit'. Units may be on a part-ownership or lease/"right to use" basis, in which the shareholders does not have any claim to ownership of the property.
ix. Role of Government shall be defined as:
a. To provide a platform for corporate and community leaders to meet and exchange ideas.
b. To create synergies and a more proactive role in facilitating partnership projects and help in its success.
c. To encourage industry.
d. Quick decision making on policy.
e. Simplify procedures.
f. Convergence of Government schemes.
g. Funding.
h. Solve problems.
x. Role of Private Industry shall be defined as:
a. Get industry involved in the 'Project'.
b. Contribute towards resource generation.
c. Contribute vital cost effective technology and management expertise.
d. Achieve higher accountability and transparency.
e. More result oriented and provide long term value for money.
f. Better administration and day-to-day coordination.
g. Safe, economic and reliable transport.
xi. Role of Community/ClubsINGOs /Other Civil Society organizations shall be defined as:
a. Chance to work in a more structured environment.
b. Advise partners of local support, requirements and needs.
c. Educating community about Government schemes and how to access them.
d. Provide local communities support and give them confidence vis-a-vis Industry role.
e. Assist in capacity building.
xii. The selection of a private party or a community organization shall be based on a fair and competitive bidding process and concurrence of Finance Department would be obtained on case to case basis.
xiii. Payment structure shall be in the form of either a minimum fixed fee for service paid by the Government or through fees collected from users/tourists or through a net revenue sharing model and payments related to the investment and success of the enterprise. In any case, the major investor/stakeholder shall have a majority share in the net revenue generated.
xiv. The issues of employment, recruitment and wages which shall be settled and negotiated with all partners involved.
xv. Duration of contract/partnership/lease is absolutely essential for the success of the enterprise. Long lease of not less than 10 (ten) years is necessary for a credible partnership in terms of security, investment and success of the enterprise.
7.5 MARKETING, PROMOTION & PUBLICITY
i. Manipur needs to develop an unique market brand, image and position which cannot be held by any other competitor. The positioning statement should be able to capture the essence of its tourism product to convey an image of the product to a potential customer. For this very specific purpose, the Government has come up with a catchy theme "Gateway
to South-East Asia”to promote tourism in Manipur on a clientele model. This unique brand seeks to market Manipur Tourism in conformity with the relevance, competitiveness, strategic location and commercial aspects of the State.
ii. Identification of the most positive vibes of the State, nurturing and showcasing of the tourism products in full cooperation with interlinked stakeholders shall be the cornerstone of marketing and promotion in domestic and international forums with the goal of increasing tourist inflow to Manipur. The Marketing Theory involving 4 'P's is essential and shall also be affected in the Planning, Production, Promotion and Publicity of Manipur Tourism.
iii. Planning is absolutely necessary to enable a leading role in the competitive tourism market, to determine a vision, to anticipate problems, identify opportunities and react quickly to market changes. The Government shall endeavour to prepare a detailed feasibility study that includes all areas of the tourism business; prepare a detailed and realistic business; prepare plans and policies that cover the areas of management, marketing, finance and human resource management, and monitor the plans regularly and adapt them as required to meet unexpected market changes. Planning also involves developing excellent time and task management skills and identifying who is best suited to perform the different tasks involved in managing the industry including outsourcing on PPP/ PPCP basis.
iv. Product development by undertaking research, market trends and prioritization of resources shall be paramount on the game plan of the Government. Niche Tourism Products like nature tourism, cultural tourism, medical & wellness tourism and eco-adventure tourism shall be vigorously developed and promoted. Various measures shall be taken-up for enhancing the capacity for growth viz., introduction of new themes like camping tourism, golf tourism, polo tourism, pilgrimage tourism, home-stay tourism and MICE tourism.
v. The mass tourism market comprises tourists from diverse backgrounds with varied interests, tastes and priorities. Target Marketing for Manipur is necessary to fragment this market into smaller, more specific target markets to identify customers who are likely to be interested in particular tourism products. High-end tourists are the immediate target and the Government shall effectively tailor the products, marketing and promotions to attract new and repeat business, mainly by customizing products and personalizing services to suit the interests and needs of the identified market segments, and selecting methods of promotion that reach and appeal to these target markets.
vi. Developing Strategies for Sustained and effective Marketing Plans and Programmes can be achieved by evolving and maintaining a system of market research activities to continuously receive, analyse, and respond to information on pricing, security issues, health, safety, quality of tourism services and products, etc., and making use of various technological tools, including the Internet, for advertising to obtain greater and wider impact.
vii. Market research shall be intensively undertaken to access information that can influence product development and sales to determine:
a. Markets most suited to tourism products by including customer characteristics, such as age, socio-economic background, lifestyle choices and personal values.
b. Origin of these markets to find out a customer's place of origin so that promotions can be targeted.
c. Customer travel style to determine the way the tourism product is tailored, packaged and promoted by finding out the influences like whether the customer travels independently, with friends or family members, or in a tour group. All these forms of travel have different product preferences, time and cost limitations.
d. Customer budget to determine a customer's travel expenditure priorities, disposable income and perceptions on value for money are important considerations when pricing the product or package.
e. Customer transport choices.
f. Cooperation and coordination because most visiting tourists will not travel to a particular location simply to visit one attraction, but can be attracted to the area if there is a collection of activities available making it essential to create packages for the region. Foreign tourists invariably prefer a package tour to an area which leads to exploring several places in the State/Region.
g. Customer satisfaction for feedback information that can be used to improve product quality and/or eliminate unpopular or unprofitable products.
h. Provide an opportunity on tourism website for customer feedback to ensure the tourism product is represented in the best way possible.
i. Unique Selling Points (USP) of the most appealing aspects of the product, as indicated by the customers, can influence the focus of the promotional material.
j. Effective promotional tools like appraisal of the content regularly read by the target market and testing the effectiveness of the current distribution methods by asking customers where they heard about the product; extent of revisits; knowing what proportion of customers currently return, or intend to return, can influence product development decisions and promotions strategy; spending habits. Priorities for customers change regularly, and considering how these changes can affect the tourism business and devise methods to adapt to meet the current trends.
viii. Making the existence of the Manipur tourism products known in the marketplace is necessary to attract tourists. The strength of the presence in the marketplace will be very much dependent on choosing the most effective distribution channels to reach and then sell to the target markets. Distribution using a variety of channels is necessary to extend the promotion and sales of the products and is dependent on target markets.
a. Direct sales through the internet are the most important tool of distribution. Worldwide usage and access to the internet is playing an increasingly important role in the travel planning and decision making processes of customers. Travel planning and booking are among the most popular online activities in major e-commerce markets. Research indicates that more travellers investigate their travel options online. The growth in online travel bookings has outpaced other online sales for many reasons, including access to
extensive information to aid selection; perceived availability of choice; convenience of booking online (from home and out of business hours); and the perception of price advantage. The Government shall establish a vibrant website which essentially broadcasts the State tourism as information, marketing and purchasing tool including transaction and online booking system.
b. Traditional distributors, that play an important part in servicing customers namely retail travel agents, wholesalers and inbound tour operators (ITO), shall be effectively partnered based on reliability of the product and commission. The retail travel agents provide customers with an accessible place to book or enquire about travel products. These agents usually provide a shop-front office for customers in shopping centres and local town centres. Wholesalers provide retailers with travel packages comprising two or more products supplied by different operators. These packages are put together in brochures, which are then distributed to networks of retail agents for display in their travel agencies. Wholesalers can also sell directly to customers. Inbound Tour Operators (ITOs) negotiate contracts directly with tourism operators on behalf of overseas wholesalers. They are responsible for developing itineraries specifically for international travellers. 'Makemytrip’, 'Thomas Cook', 'Tripadvisor’, 'Cleartrip’, 'Cox & Kings' are some trip organizers which the Government may tie-up with.
c. Package Tours: Attractive package tours with schedule tour timetables consisting of multiple destinations, boarding, lodging and meal plans shall be designed keeping in mind the specific need and choices of different tourists. The package tours and the itineraries shall be developed with the help of State Tourism Department by the private sector & tour operators and shall be revised/updated from time to time. The tour Packages shall be distributed to Hotels, Travel Agencies and Tour Operators for them to receive bookings and facilitate the tours under the guidance of the Tourism Department. This approach would provide hassle free travel to the tourist with confirmed bookings and routings, saves time, provides discounted pricing with other ancillary service benefits. Package Tours can be daily tours/weekend tours covering inter/intra city and districts with the option of Group Inclusive Tours (GIT)/Free Individual Tours (FIT) or customized tour package to meet the need and wants of the varied tourists.
d. Travel Agencies and Tour Operators: Travel Agents and Tour Operators (Inbound/Outbound/Domestic) along with Tourist Transport Operators shall be encouraged and sensitized for facilitating smooth movement of tourists within and across State boundaries. Travel Agencies and Tour Operators should get approval from the designated authority for a uniform tourism operation through licensing. The licensing and other regulations are to be reviewed periodically with recommendations for improvements. All the Travel Agents and Tour Operatiors including Tour Guides and Escorts shall be provided training with established standards for their operation and services.
ix. Advertising campaigns including print and electronic advertising placed in local, regional or
national newspapers, ethnic publications, trade and tourist magazines, journals or newsletters, and magazines relevant to the target market should be effective and create a competitive edge based on customer characteristics, timing, competition, value-added services, price, positioning, unique selling points (USP), media available, budget and previous advertising experiences. Advertising alternatives using cheaper methods including
leaflets/flyers, canvassing, wholesaler programs, sponsorship of local community events which attract large crowds and significant media coverage and whose participation can improve business exposure, listings and displays, e-marketing and editorial/added-value should be negotiated when purchasing advertising space with different media.
x. Steps shall be taken-up to promote State tourism viz., strengthening the tourism information offices outside with qualified manpower & infrastructure, participation in travel and trade fairs - domestic and overseas, organizing road shows, FAM (familiarization) trips of media persons, TV teams, film makers, trade representatives, provide brochures/media support, distribution of literature, posters, calendars, newsletter, electronic, print and digital publicity, CDs, jingles, outdoor campaigns and publicity in malls, airports, and other strategic places; tackle visa issues; aggressive marketing of identified niche tourism products; national & international travel associations to be encouraged to have trips to Manipur; and, develop a dynamic-interactive website providing various information in an integrated and cohesive manner. Organizing contests like photography and production of good promotional films needs to be undertaken. MICE tourism needs to be focused on how to fill the low season months of the year. Medical tourism needs to be aggressively marketed and publicized.
xi. Focus shall be on online publicity which has higher reach and is cost effective. The Tourism Department maintains two websites viz., www.manipurtourism.gov.in and www.sangaifestival.gov.in for online publicity. These two websites would be hyper-linked to the State Government's Official website i.e.www.manipur.gov.in. Mobile applications and social networking site like Facebook, Twitter, Google+, etc. shall be used for quick and cost effective tourism marketing.
xii. Efforts to make use of technology for higher productivity and improve the methods and processes of working in the tourism sector through e-governance, IT & IT Enabled Services besides significantly encouraging e-commerce portals to extend effective promotion and marketing support to investors, hoteliers, tour operators, medical facilitators, etc.
xiii. Connectivity is one of the impediments for the growth of tourism in Manipur. Air travel is the strength of Manipur and should play a critical role in enhancing Manipur's competitiveness as a tourism hotspot. Increased capacity and frequency of flights is necessary alongwith improving the standard of facilities and services at the airport.
xiv. Tours & Travel operators shall be encouraged and sensitized for facilitating smooth movement of tourists within and across state boundaries.
xv. The Government will present awards and citations to excellent entrepreneurs, hoteliers, tour travel operators and other tourism related service providers to encourage and promote the tourism industry in Manipur.
7.6 ESTABLISHMENT OF STATE COTTAGE INDUSTRIES EMPORIUM
The State would establish State Cottage Industries Emporium (SCIE) for promotion of rich and varied local Handicrafts and Handlooms of the State. Towards establishment of SCIE, the State would provide land free of cost to the PPP partner, who would be selected in a transparent manner through ‘Open Competitive Bidding'. The selected PPP partner would be responsible for creation of necessary infrastructure (including construction of building, design, decor & its refurbishment) and also for all the recurring operational expenses. The PPP partner would keep specimen of their products and brochure can be prepared which will indicate where these products are available. The SCIE would be run on profit sharing basis and the PPP partner would share minimum 10% of net profit, to be paid every quarter to the Government.
The proposed SCIE, would be run under a ‘Government Committee' and in consultation with Commerce & Industries, Tourism and Arts & Culture Departments. The SCIE would promote Handicrafts and Handlooms unique to the different tribes & ethnic groups in the State and also strive to become place where the visitors not only get attracted to local Handicrafts and Handlooms but also become messengers for marketing the same within India and abroad.
7.7 COMMERCIAL APPROACH
i. Tourism has been accorded ''Industry Status by the Government of Manipur in January,
1987, and was included under the Industrial Policy of Manipur, 1996 and thus eligible to get all admissible incentives/support accordingly. However, in the recently notified 'The
Industrial & Investment Policy of Manipur, 2013 - (IIPM, 2013)', it seems that somehow Tourism Sector has been left out. Therefore, State needs to consider including 'Tourism Sector' in IIPM, 2013 and thereby enable Tourism Units to avail of all admissible incentives/supports under IIPM, 2013.
ii. The State Tourism department would delineate the financial cost-benefit analysis of their project proposals at the beginning till the sustained level is attained by the Tourism Industry in the State. Weightage may be assigned for better economic benefit w.r.to the cost involved.
iii. The main objective of the development of Tourism in the State is to create employment opportunities and thus improve livelihood. To facilitate this objective, exemption from Luxury Tax, VAT, Stamp Duties, etc. be considered for specific units as per the requirements and on case to case basis, with prior concurrence of Finance Department. These incentives are an essential pre-requisite to attract investment from the private sector.
iv. Incentives and subsidies may be considered in future for creating infrastructure in terms of ‘Tourism Units' for promoting the growth of tourism. Tourism Units and enterprises for Hospitality Sector would be provided assistance and facilitated under the Industrial and Investment Policy of Manipur, 2013(IIPM, 2013). Further, the Government would sponsor proposals from the entrepreneurs in Hospitality Sector on priority and recommend the same to the Government of India for sanction and assistance under North-East Industrial and Investment Promotion Policy (NEIIPP), 2007.
v. To begin with, a proposal would be considered for providing incentives to the tune of 20% for a new 'Tourism Unit,involving one crore rupees and above in concurrence with Planning and Finance Departments. The 20% of the capital cost of investment on land, building, water supply, plant and machinery, subject to a ceiling of Rs 35.00 lakhs, shall be provided for all tourism related activities subject to the condition that the financial assistance will be released only after the completion and commencing operation of the ‘Tourism Units' and the incentive/ subsidy would be performance linked based on transparent parameters and the rate of revenue share/ royalty decided in consultation with Finance Department. Further, it is stipulated that the hotel/amenities so established should run for a minimum of 10 (ten) years. While considering such cases, efforts should be made to ensure that:
a. Land to be acquired for the tourism unit is purchased from the villager/land owner.
b. Participation of local people on partnership basis for better success.
c. Factors like accommodations, availability of Water supply & Power Supply to be examined properly at the time of site selection.
d. Restoration of existing Tourist Homes into full-fledged Tourist Homes.
e. Selection of Tourism Unit by the Tourism Advisory Committee (TAC) to be headed by Chief Secretary.
vi. A new 'Tourism Untshall mean one which commences operation of the project on or after 1stOctober, 2014, with prior approval in writing from the State Government. It shall also include the expansion, modernization and diversification of existing 'Tourism Unit’. Only projects approved by the Tourism Advisory Committee (TAC) would be eligible for the incentives/concessions.
vii. A 'Tourism Unit’ shall mean private commercial establishments providing public services/facilities in identified tourism destinations and shall include the following:
a. Accommodation units including Hotels, Wayside Amenities, Cultural Centres, Convention Centres, etc.
b. Tourist Resorts & Lodges, Spas, Yoga Centres, Restaurants.
c. Amusement Parks & Adventure Sports Complex.
viii. One of the major bottlenecks in creation of 'Tourism Units’ especially hotels are the non¬availability of land for the purpose. A 'Land Bank" is needed to be established to know exactly where land is available for infrastructure development at strategic and prioritised destinations. The 'Land Bank’ seeks to provide for the allotment of land or allotment of land on lease, in the identified zone/areas/acquired land, for handing over to the Government/ investor for use in setting-up the 'Tourism Unit’. The steps that may be taken are.
a. Master Plan of Imphal City and district headquarters should mark commercial sites for construction of hotels, convention and exhibition centres.
b. The hotel sites should be allotted on long-term lease basis or could be allotted under the PPP mode through joint venture, revenue sharing, etc.
c. The hotels should be allowed higher Floor Area Ratio/Floor Space Index (FAR/FSI) so that more rooms and commercial spaces are created out of the same space and it also helps in generating sustainable revenues; and
d. The land should also be allotted for building of guest houses in major tourist destinations.
ix. Royalties or Entry Fees, which are usage-based payments made by one party (the "licensee") and another (the "licensor") for ongoing use of specified State assets, shall be paid to the Government and the license agreements shall be regulated by the Government who is the resource owner. The royalty rates shall be determined by the Government with the interest of the stakeholders in mind. These specified State assets have been identified for adventurous activities and expeditions of Keibul Lamjao National Park, Lamdan Adventure Complex, Tharon Caves, Khangkhui Caves, Hills and Dzukou Valley.
x. A Single Window Clearance System needs to be established in the State to cut red-tape and ensure expeditious clearances and permissions of feasible tourism projects for various
'Tourism Units' required from the State Government that will benefit both investors and the community. The Tourism Advisory Committee headed by the Chief Secretary shall be the High-Powered Committee looking into this matter. This system seeks to facilitate trade and investment by dealing with a single body for various items such as land, permits, power and water supply, and finance which are necessary for establishing a ‘Tourism Unit'. The system shall allow investors to lodge standardized information and documents once with a single entry point to fulfill all tourism related regulatory requirement.
xi. Home-Stay programmes under the Government of India Scheme of ‘Incredible India Bed & Breakfast' needs to be promoted in Manipur too. These establishments should be treated as non-commercial. For this purpose, State may adopt Government of India's guidelines in this regard.
xii. All subsidies, incentives and other supports enunciated above would continue till Tourism Industry in Manipur takes-off and is stabilized.
7.8 LEGISLATION & REGULATION
i. Exclusion of Manipur from Protected Area Permit (PAP) Regime notified under the Foreigners (Protected Areas) Orders, 1958.
Ministry of Home Affairs has excluded Manipur from the PAP Regime notified under the Foreigners (Protected Areas) Orders, 1958 initially for a period of 1 (one) year w.e.f. 1st January, 2011. Then onwards, the Ministry of Home Affairs has been issuing circulars excluding Manipur from PAP Regime from time to time. At present, the Ministry of Home Affairs (Foreigners Division), Government of India vide its Circular No. 431 dated 31st December, 2013 has excluded the entire area of the State of Manipur from the Protected Area Regime notified under the Foreigners (Protected Areas) Orders, 1958 for a further period of two years beyond 31.12.2013, that is, w.e.f. 1st January, 2014, subject to the following conditions:
a. Citizens of Afghanistan, China and Pakistan and foreign nationals having their origin in
these countries would continue to require prior approval of the Ministry of Home Affairs before their visit to the State of Manipur. It may be ensured that they are not allowed to visit the State of Manipur without the requisite Protected Area Permit, action may be taken under the relevant provisions of the Foreigners Act.
b. AH Foreigners visiting Manipur will register themselves with the designated Foreigners
Registration Officers (FRO) of the State within 24 hours of their arrival. State Government of Manipur will ensure strict implementation of these provisions.
c. FRO/Police authorities should keep a dose watch on the activities of the foreigners visiting the States. If anything adverse is found, appropriate action may be taken under the relevant Acts including the Foreigners Act.
Further, Myanmar nationals visiting the State may also be excluded from the requirement of obtaining PAP initially for a period of one year w.e.f. 01.01.2014subject to the following conditions:
a. All such Myanmar nationals shall obtain a visa from the Indian Missions/ Posts abroad at any of the designated Airports in India at which Visa on Arrival (VoA) facility has been made available to the nationals of Myanmar under the existing procedure.
b. All such Myanmar nationals shall have to compulsorily register themselves with the Foreign Registration Officer (FRO) of the State/ District they visit with 24 hours of arrival.
c. FRO concerned shall send a report giving details of all such Myanmar nationals registered with them to the Ministry of Home Affairs (Foreigners Division) within 48 hours of their arrival.
d. No such registration would be required if the Myanmar nationals are only passing through the State road with no intention of staying in that particular State.
ii. Issue of VISA on Arrival (VoA) at Moreh to Myanmar's Nationals for Medical Treatment at Imphal.
Manipur has excellent healthcare/medical facilities available at Imphal in, both public and private sectors. Several Myanmar's nationals visit Manipur via Moreh for medical treatment in Hospitals at Imphal. The Government of Manipur earnestly pursued the matter with the Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India. The then, Minister of Home Affairs vide his D.O. letter dated 27.01.2014 has conveyed in principal approval for establishing VISA on Arrival (VoA) facility at Imphal Airport and at Moreh. Further, the Government of Manipur was advised to take-up the following actions:
a. Make the immigration facilities fully functional.
b. Arrange a suitable building so that, Ministry of Home Affairs can instruct NIC to install the Integrated ICs software.
c. Arrange for training of manpower dedicated to immigration functions by having their training from Bureau of Immigration.
d. Arrange for additional space in the office of FRO/SP (CID) for installation of C-FRO software for registration of foreigners.
Accordingly, Government of Manipur has made a budgetary provision of Rs. 1.00 crore for construction/renovation of the immigration post at Moreh. Further, training of 26 (twenty six) officials of various ranks of the State Police Department as Immigration Officers for manning the immigration facilities to be set-up at Moreh and Imphal Airport is also being undertaken at Foreigner Regional Registration Office (FRRO), Kolkata from 17.06.2014.
Once the immigration facilities are created at Imphal Airport and at Moreh and also the Training of Immigration Officers are completed, a report would be submitted by the Home Department, Government of Manipur to the Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of India for formal approval of the VISA on Arrival (VoA) and commissioning of the immigration facilities.
iii. Tourism Units and enterprises for Hospitality Sector would be provided assistance and facilitated under the ‘Industrial and Investment Policy of Manipur, 2013 (IIPM, 2013)'. Further, the Government would sponsor proposals from the entrepreneurs in Hospitality Sector on priority and recommend the same to the Government of India for sanction and assistance under North-East Industrial and Investment Promotion Policy (NEIIPP), 2007.
iv. The State Government would independently bring out a comprehensive ‘Medical Tourism Policy' for the growth and promotion of this sector.
v. Safety and security of the tourists shall be paramount on the Government's agenda which is essential for promoting the growth of tourism and projecting Manipur as a safe tourism destination. No legal framework for the protection of tourists & belongings is felt necessary as existing laws such as IPC or any other Act relating to offences against persons and properties would also be applicable to the tourists & their properties. For protection of tourists & their belongings, the existing laws would have to be enforced depending upon the nature of problem & it is more of preventive measures that the Police would have to take up to ensure safety & security of the tourists within the existing legal framework. Existing institutional mechanism like the concerned Police Stations will deal with complaints received from the tourists & the industry. Later on, after official announcement of tourists spots in the State, if necessary, Police Outposts/Tourist Booths may be set up under the control of the concerned Police Stations and District SP. Tourists pickets/booths may be set up on need basis if the existing Police Stations are not in the proximity of tourist spots. This may bring about a secure environment for tourism to flourish in the State. For development of infrastructure for tourist police, funds would be provided by the Tourism Department. The Tourism Department would also provide/procure equipments that may be required separately for the police officers and personnel deployed for such type of duty, including their specialized training.
vi. Licenses to be provided and regulated to various service providers namely, tour operators, travel agents, travel transporters, etc.
vii. All efforts shall be put in, worked out and pursued with other departments to vacate all tourist centres presently being occupied by the security forces and other agencies.
viii. Travel Trade Code of 'Safe & Honourable' tourism to be adopted in the guidelines of approval of service providers and hotels.
ix. Certification of 'Tourism Units (including Homestay)' for quality, safety and maintains proper hygienic standards.
x. Tourism in Forest & Wildlife & Wildlife Area will be subject to clearance under Forest Conservation Act, 1980, Indian Forest Act, 1972 & Wildlife Protection Act, 1972
7.9 SUSTAINABLE AND RESPONSIBLE TOURISM
Development should not be at the cost of environment. Harmony between man and nature should be maintained at all cost. The tourists can be a great source of development but also lead to unmanageable pollution if not tackled properly. Amarnath Yatra is a fine example of tourism gone awry for environment with people polluting publicly into the river. The Government in close association with other stakeholders shall put in all efforts to minimize the ecological impacts due to development and growth of tourism in the State. Best Practices that promote Sustainable & Green Technologies in the hospitality sector shall be adopted. The Tourism Policy aims to create the conditions for the sustainable growth and development of tourism for the benefit of all Manipuri's focusing on the following key areas:
Sl. No. FOCUS AREA WAYS IN WHICH POLICY SEEKS TO CONTRIBUTE TO ACHIEVEMENT OF
THESE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
1. Create conditions for sustainable tourism
growth and development • Facilitating increased tourist volumes, tourist spend and geographical spread of tourism.
• Enhancing service quality levels.
• Facilitating investment in infrastructure and product development into tourism priority areas.
• Creating awareness of the economic potential and impacts of tourism.
• Promoting domestic tourism.
• Monitoring tourism trends and timely provision of information to the public and private sectors.
2. Promote the conservation and sustainable
development of natural resources • Promoting eco-tourism through policy initiatives, product development and awareness campaigns.
• Encouraging community involvement
and partnership in tourism
development.
3 Protect and improve the quality and safety of the environment • Promoting responsible tourism
practices within the tourism industry
4 Promote a State
sustainable development agenda • Promoting responsible tourism
principles and practices through international tourism structures.
5 Transformation • Empowering the tourism industry through public sector procurement practices, training, tourism awareness creation and tourism enterprise funding instruments.
7.10 RESEARCH, ANALYSIS, MONITORING & EVALUATION


i. Resource allocation in the budget for tourism is very negligible. A realistic approach and higher allocation is necessary so that the State and the people can derive the benefits that flow from such investments in terms of employment generation, poverty alleviation and earning foreign exchange, etc.
ii. Market research and impact studies to facilitate policies and programmes. Effective monitoring of tourism projects. Regular market surveys and studies will be carried out to understand the requirements of tourists as also the impact of past promotional measures to take requisite corrective or new policy initiatives.
iii. Inter-sectoral Weightage shall be given considering the priorities as under:
Sl. No. Priority Weight
1 Development of Tourism Infrastructure (including Tourist Accommodation) 35
2 Human Resource Development 15
3 Marketing, Promotion & Publicity 15
4 Developing New Tourism Products 15
5 Commercial Incentives 10
6 Market Research 10
TOTAL 100


iv. The Tourism Advisory Committee will act as a State Level Monitoring Committee and shall obtain reports on a regular basis and undergo periodical inspection of projects/sites and also through independent agencies having technical expertise.
v. Economic impact assessments should be carried out by first estimating the change in the number and types of visitors associated with the policy or action being evaluated. Visits are translated into economic terms by estimating the amount of spending by these visitors in the local area. The spending can then be applied to a model of the region's economy to estimate the effects in terms of sales, income and jobs. Regional economic multipliers are used to estimate the secondary effects of visitor spending.
The formula for ascertaining the economic impact is - Economic impact = Number of Visitors * Average spending per visitor * Multiplier. This model is further elaborated as under:
a. Dividing visitors into distinct segments with different spending patterns (e.g. campers, day users, visitors in motels).
b. Measuring spending in distinct spending categories (e.g. lodging, restaurant meals, gas, groceries).
c. Allocating spending into the economic sectors that receive it and applying economic ratios and multipliers for those sectors.
vi. Regular interaction with stakeholders of hospitality sector for review of guidelines on approval and classification every two years to incorporate best practices and to meet contemporary challenges.
vii. Concrete and efficient compilation of tourism statistics by adopting a uniform methodology for formulation of policies and programmes and dissemination of data for use in industry, by stakeholders and research scholars and general public.
viii. Dissemination of data through website for better citizen awareness.
ix. Prepare panel of consultants for tourism related studies.
x. To establish systems to capture and analyze segregated data across all niche segments such as Nature, Cultural, Medical, Adventure, Wildlife, MICE, etc. thus allowing for greater understanding of the opportunities and needs of these segments.
xi. Assess the requirement of manpower in Hospitality and Travel Trade Sector and assess the effectiveness of financial incentives.
xii. Performance management to achieve better development orientation.
xiii. To bring about a systematic improvement in monitoring mechanism and thereby contribute to better governance of projects, improve the outcome and timeliness of implementation. Devise ways and methods to evolve a mechanism for maintenance and proper upkeep of the tourism infrastructure. Inspecting the quality of tourism projects and suggests steps for improving the quality of tourism experience.
xiv. Stakeholder engagement through coordination meetings, conferences, etc. with Industry & Trade Associations, Approved Tourism Establishments, Hospitality & Travel Institutes and other Government departments for prioritization, sharing of new ideas, problems & issues analysis, skill enhancement, etc.
xv. State to play a pro-active role and approach in involving tourism stakeholders.
xvi. A Tourism Satellite Accounting System (TSA) to be adopted to gauge more precisely the contribution of tourism to the State's economy.
7.11 TOURISM DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEES
For effective monitoring and co-ordination, Committees at different levels may be constituted to ensure comprehensive and sustained development of tourism in the State.
i. A State Level Tourism Steering Committee (SLTSC) under the chairmanship of the Hon'ble Chief Minister of Manipur shall be constituted to provide guidance and impetus to the development and growth of tourism in the State. This ‘Committee' is essential to improve policy integration and co-ordination. The ‘Committee' may consist of the following members:
i. Chief Minister, Manipur Chairman
ii. Minister (Tourism), Manipur Vice-Chairman
iii. Minister (Home), Manipur Member
iv. Minister (Finance), Manipur Member
v. Minister (Planning), Manipur Member
vi. Minister (Arts & Culture), Manipur Member
vii. Minister (Commerce & Industries), Manipur Member
viii. Minister (Revenue), Manipur Member
ix. Minister (Hills), Manipur Member
x. Minister (Works), Manipur Member
xi. Minister (Power), Manipur Member
xii. Minister (PHED), Manipur Member
xiii. Minister (MAHUD), Manipur Member
xiv. Minister (Forests & Environment), Manipur Member
xv. Minister (Transport), Manipur Member
xvi. Chairman (Manipur State Pollution Board) Member
xvii. Chief Secretary, Government of Manipur Member
xviii. Director General of Police Member


xix. Administrative Secretary (Finance), Government of Manipur Member
xx. Administrative Secretary (Planning), Government of Manipur Member
xxi. Administrative Secretary (Home), Government of Manipur Member
xxii. Administrative Secretary (Environment & Forest), Government of Manipur Member
xxiii. Administrative Secretary (Art& Culture), Government of Manipur Member
xxiv. Administrative Secretary (Commerce & Industries), Government of Manipur Member
xxv. Administrative Secretary (Revenue), Government of Manipur Member
xxvi. Administrative Secretary (Hills), Government of Manipur Member
xxvii. Administrative Secretary (Works), Government of Manipur Member
xviii. Administrative Secretary (Power), Government of Manipur Member
xxix. Administrative Secretary (PHED), Government of Manipur Member
xxx. Administrative Secretary (MAHUD), Government of Manipur Member
xxxi. Administrative Secretary (Transport), Government of Manipur Member
xxxii. Principal Chief Conservator of Forests Member
xxiii. Administrative Secretary (Tourism), Government of
Manipur Member-Secretary
xxiv. Any other member(s) with permission of the Chairman


The State Level TSC shall meet every 6 (six) months and deliberate upon the issues for comprehensive development and growth of tourism industry in the State.
ii. A tourism think tank shall be constituted for fostering inter-departmental and inter-agency co-operation & co-ordination, for advising on general policies and planning of tourism related matters including infrastructure development essential for the development, promotion, monitoring, maintenance and growth of the Tourism and Hospitality Industry in Manipur. This will also include the accreditation of healthcare and other tourism related facilities, setting-up of the benchmark for 'Tourism Units', etc.
iii. For achieving these objectives, the Government would constitute a Tourism Advisory Committee (TAC). The Tourism Advisory Committee shall consist of the following members:
i. Chief Secretary, Government of Manipur Chairman
ii. Administrative Secretary (Tourism), Manipur Member
iii. Administrative Secretary (Finance), Manipur Member
iv. Administrative Secretary (Planning), Manipur Member
v. Administrative Secretary (Home), Manipur Member
vi. Administrative Secretary (Arts & Culture), Manipur Member
vii. Administrative Secretary (Commerce & Industries), Manipur Member
viii. Administrative Secretary (Revenue) , Manipur Member
ix. Administrative Secretary (Hills), Manipur Member
x. Administrative Secretary (Works), Manipur Member


The TAC shall also act as a High Powered Committee for Single Window Clearance System. TAC shall meet every 3 (three) months to take stock of actions taken by the concerned departments/agencies and to make constructive suggestions for promotion of Travel and Tourism Industry in Manipur. Definite timelines would be defined by the Tourism Department for implementation of Manipur Tourism Policy, 2014 and the 'Master Plan' which would be reviewed & monitored by TAC every three months.
This 'TAC' will directly look into creation of infrastructure and push the Rail connection and may operate on the basis of Sub-Committees to be formed for the following purposes, which will make recommendations to the 'TAC'. The 'TAC' members may also be members of the Sub-committees. Taking into the consideration the constructive suggestions from out of the White Paper - Conclusions & Suggestions based on Manipur Eco-Tourism Conclave held on 7th & 8th April, 2014, the 'TAC' would constitute the following Sub-Committees:
A. Ecotourism Sub-committees:
Wildlife Sanctuaries, National Parks, Nature Gardens, Orchidarium (Orchid Lab), Caves, Waterfalls, Biking, Jeep Safaris, Skiing, Rafting, etc.
Implement the STCI code for responsible tourism.
Code for trekking to be formulated.
Setting Standards & Certification.
Rescue, Safety, First Aid.
Codify Routes.
Name Peaks - Give them a personality.
Develop a nature garden near Imphal.
Develop Dos * Don'ts.
Work on carrying capacity.
[Senior functionaries of the Eco-Tourism Society of India (ESOI) would be co¬opted as Members/Advisors of this Sub-committee.] 
B. Lakes & Waterways Tourism:
This Sub-committee will essentially establish and implement the norms for in and around lakes and waterways. In this connection the CODE FOR WATER BASED TOURISM ESTABLISED BY THE MINISTRY OF TOURISM, Government of India may be adopted by the State and apart from the Department of Environment & Ecology, Manipur may set-up a MONITORING LABORATORY to ensure there are no pollutants, affluent, silting and weeding damaging the lake. A tourism zone shall be crated around the lake & local community is settled & trained to directly benefit from this tourism.
Water Sports to be introduced through PPP hydrology needs to be implemented. No building or construction or residential unit (Houseboat) would be allowed to come-up in and on the lake except at the distance specified in the codes, outside the no construction zone. All tourism assets around the lake will have to comply with vernacular architecture. The Lakes & Waterways expert shall be a member of this 'Sub-committee'.
C. Heritage, Culture & Art Craft:
This Sub-committee will formulate suggestion to promote the Built & Tangible Heritage of the State. Among the Heritage Assets are:
a. War Cemetery/War Memorial
b. INA Museum
c. Kangla Fort
d. Women's Market (Ima Market)
e. India's oldest Airfield
f. Dance & Music
g. Martial Art
h. Govindajee Temple
i. Local Art and Craft
j. Knowledge of local medicine etc.
The Kangla Fort area may be transformed into a grand tourism experience and asset with Sound and Light Show, Tribal Art & Craft promotion Centre & Museum i.e., Nungi Pottery, Bamboo Craft, Food Court with local cuisine-(Black Rice), an Amphi-Theatre for performance of music, dance & local arts, Centre to promote local herbal medicine- orthopedic herbs, convert the cottage into Heritage hotel., regular Polo event in the first Polo ground in the world, have a responsible Tourism Interpretation Centre and create a boating & walking experience around the moat. This Sub-committee should also lay down guidelines to ensure that tourism products in eco-sensitive areas adapt to vernacular architectural designs.
This 'Sub-committee' will also draw up guidelines for setting up a Tribal Tourism circuit & home stay with total community involvement and also showcase the diverse culture of different tribes & assets like indigenous medicine, crafts etc.
The State Government should come out with a policy of approving and promoting 'HOME STAYS' in village and tribal areas including those around Loktak Lake along trekking routes & nature and wild life parks and tribal village centres.
D. Architecture & Design Classification Committee:
The Ministry Tourism, Government of India norms for all tourism service providers should be implemented specially all aspects of safety, security, hygiene, sanitation, garbage segregation & disposal, pollution, energy & water conservation vernacular designs, parking etc, to be addressed. A criteria for all hotels for energy conservation & water management to be developed.
7.12 MANIPUR TOURISM DEVELOPMENT SOCIETY (MTDS)
For professional and efficient management of the Tourism related activities the State Government would consider establishment of Manipur Tourism Development Society (MTDS) which would have more flexibility in operation and administration, thereby bringing in desired efficiency in promotion of tourism industry in the State.
7.13 TOURISM LITERATURE
Government would update its tourism literature (both print and electronic) from time to time and disseminate it professionally besides uploading it on the concerned websites. A copy of the latest Tourism Brochure published by the Directorate of Tourism, Manipur is attached.
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Introduction - 5
Culture & Traditions - 6-7
Flora & Fauna - 8-9
Handloom, Handicrafts & Fine Arts - 10-11
Festivals of Manipur - 12-15
Indigenous Sports - 16-19
Native Music & Cuisines - 20-21
Adventure Sports - 22-23
Medical Tourism - 24
Hospitality Industry - 25
Imphal City & Surrounding Areas - 26-29
Bishnupur District - 30-33
Thoubal District - 34
Chandel District - 35
Churachandpur District - 36
Ukhrul District - 37
Tamenglong District - 37
Senapati District - 38-39
Yellow Pages - 40-41
Travel Map - 42-43
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pur Tourism
INTRODUCTION
Manipur, fondly called by Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru as the “Jewel of India”, is a little Shangrila located in a lush green corner of North-East India between 23.83° & 25.68° North latitudes and 93.03° & 94.78° East longitudes. An oval shaped valley surrounded by nine ranges of bluish-green hills intertwined with cascading rapids, tripping rivers, carpets of flowers, exotic blooms and lazy lakes, she has inspired descriptions such as the “Switzerland of the East”. One of the most profound observations was made by Lady St.Clair Grimwood, author of ‘My Three Years in Manipur’ who described her as ‘A pretty place more beautiful than many snow places of the world’.
Sharing an international border with Myanmar, the state has a strategic importance in India’s Look East Policy and is set to become the Gateway to South¬East Asia and an important tourist destination in the near future. The people of Manipur include Meities, Nagas, Gorkhas, Meitei Pangals, Kuki - Chin - Mizo groups and many other colorful communities who have co-existed in complete harmony over the centuries. These are people whose folklore, myths and legends, dances, indigenous games and martial arts, cuisines, exotic handlooms and handicrafts are invested with the mystique of nature and an indefatigable Joie de 
CULTURE & TRADITIONS
Manipur is a mosaic of ancient traditions and rich cultural patterns. In the field of art and culture, the State is best represented by its classical and folk dance forms. Raas Leelas depict the Leelas (Sports) of Lord Krishna as a child with Gopies (Milkmaids) of Brindavan, and express their yearning for communion with the “Lord”. The Raas Dance is perfectly lyrical and has extremely graceful movements. A spring festival, the “Lai-Haraoba” held in April-May is symbolized by a traditional stylized and ritualistic dance performed for peace and prosperity. The tribal folk dances are an expression of nature, of creation, of aestheticism in the tribal way of life. One will be charmed by the colourful costumes, dances





























































Flora & Fauna
Blessed with an amazing variety of flora and fauna, 67% of the geographical area of Manipur are hill tracts covered with green forests. Churachandpur and Tamenglong districts in particular have vast areas covered with bamboo forests. In a small area of about 22,000 sq. km, Manipur has alpine forests of pines, grasslands and meadows at Dzuko and Shirui, coveted the world over. Some of the most beautiful and precious blooms and orchids abound in their natural habitat spreading their beauty and colour, stunning eyes that are not used to seeing them in such profusion. There are about 500 varieties of orchids which grow in Manipur of which 472 have been identified. The Hoolock Gibbon, Slow Loris, Spotted Linshang, Mrs. Hume’s Barbacked pheasant, Blyths Tragopan,
Hornbills, etc. form only a small part of the rich natural heritage of Manipur. Nong-in is the State bird of Manipur.





















The handloom and handicrafts items of Manipur are sought after souvenirs for tourists. It is an indispensable aspect of the socio-economic life. There is a saying that every woman of Manipur is a born weaver. The more than 33 different communities in the State have imprinted upon their handloom products, exquisite designs peculiar to their communities.
Manipur pottery is crafted without a potter's wheel. It is an enthralling experience to witness the potters of Andro, Thongjao and Nungbi deftly moulding an unbelievable range of earthenware. Beautiful pieces of art made of cane and bamboo form an important part of handicrafts. Tourists would like to take home a lifan, phak (weed mat), phiruk, Manipuri Dolls and a host of other beautiful carvings from various rare and exotic varieties of timber. 
Manipur Tourism
FESTIVALS OF MANIPUR
Manipur is a land of festivities, merriment and mirth all year round. A year in Manipur presents a cycle of festivals. Hardly a month passes without a festival or two being celebrated. To the Manipuris, festivals are symbols of their cultural, social and religious aspirations.
Gang-Ngai - Festival of Kabui Nagas
Celebrated for five days in the month of December/ January, Gang- Ngai is an important festival of the Kabui Nagas. The festival opens with the omen taking ceremony on the first day. The rest of the days are associated with common feast, dances of old men and women and of boys and girls, and presentation of gifts amongst others.
Lui-Ngai-Ni
It is a collective festival of the Nagas observed on the 15th day of February every year. This is a seed-sowing festival after which tribes belonging to the Naga group begin their cultivation. Social-gatherings, songs, dances and rejoicings highlight the festivity. This annual festival also plays a great role in boosting the morale and in strengthening the bond of Naga solidarity.



























Yaoshang (Holi) - Festival of Manipuri Hindus
Celebrated for five days commencing from the full moon day of Phalguna (February/March), Yaoshang is an important festival of Manipur. The Thabal Chongba, a Manipuri folk dance where boys and girls hold hands together and sing and dance in a circle, is particularly associated with this festival. Yaoshang to Manipur is what Durga Puja is to Bengal, Diwali to North India and Bihu to Assam.
Cheiraoba - The Manipuri New Year
On the ocassion of Cheiraoba, special festive dishes are prepared which are first offered to various deities. Celebrated during the month of April, a part of the ritual entails villagers climbing the nearest hill tops in the belief that it will enable them to rise to greater heights in their worldly life.
Kang (Rath Yatra)
One of the greatest festivals of the Hindus of Manipur, this festival is celebrated for ten days in the month of July. Lord Jagannath leaves his temple in a chariot known as ‘Kang’ in Manipur pulled by devotees who vie with one another for this honour. 
Heikru Hitongba
This is a boat racing festival celebrated in the month of September. Long narrow boats are used to accommodate a large number of rowers. Idol of Lord Vishnu is installed before the commencement of the race.
Ningol Chak-kouba - a social festival of Manipuris
It is the one of the biggest festivals of the Meiteis. Married daughters of the family come to their parental houses along with their children and enjoy sumptuous feasts. It is an ocassion for family reunion and gifting. It is celebrated on the second day of the new moon in the month of Hiyangei of the Manipuri lunar Calender system and falls usually in November
Chumpha - Festival of the Tangkhul Nagas
Celebrated for seven days in the month of December, the Chumpha festival is a great festival of the Tangkhul Nagas. The festival is held after the season’s harvest. The last three days are devoted to social gatherings and rejoicing. Unlike other festivals of the Tangkhul Nagas, here women play a special role in the 
INDIGENOUS SPORTS
The tradition of sports finds its origin in the ancient history of Manipur - a history of small kingdoms which were in keen competition with one another. Wars among themselves and with Awa (Myanmar) had resulted in a martial tradition which in turn gave way to the development of various indigenous games.
Thang Ta & Sarit Sarak (Manipuri Martial Arts)
These are the Manipuri Martial Arts, the traditions of which have been passed down over the centuries. It is a very energetic and skillful art and was a way to hone one’s battle craft during peace time in the olden days when every Manipuri was a warrior who was required to serve his country in times of war. Today, these arts are being practised widely by even women and children alike.
Khong Kangjei
Like polo, Khong Kangjei, is also a very popular game for the Manipuris. The game is played between two
teams with seven players on either side and each player is equipped with a bamboo stick about 4 ft. in length made in the form of the modern hockey stick. The game starts with a throw of a ball made from bamboo root in a field of 200 X 80 yards in area. A player may carry the ball in any manner to the goal. He may even kick it but he has to score the goal only by hitting the ball with his stick. There is no goal post and a goal is scored when the ball crosses the goal line completely. A player often encounters an opponent in his attempt at carrying or hitting the ball towards the goal. The encounter may develop into a trial of strength which is indigenously known as Mukna. The game requires much physical stamina, speed and agility.
























Yubi Lakpi
means snatching in the Manipuri Language. Here each side has 7 players in a field measuring 45m x 18m in area. One end of the field has a rectangular box measuring 4.5m x 3m, one side of which forms the central portion of the goal line. To score a goal, a player has to approach the goal from the front with his oiled coconut and pass the goal line. The coconut serves the purpose of a ball and is offered to the king or the judges who sit just beyond the goal line. However, in ancient times, the teams were not equally matched as the player with the coconut had to tackle all the rest of the player.
Mukna (Manipuri Wrestling)
This is a game similar to wrestling played between two male rivals for trial of strength by use of sheer physical strength and skill. Athletes of the same or approximately the same physical built, weight or age are made to compete with each other. Mukna is a highly popular game. In the olden days, the game enjoyed royal patronage. 
INDIGENOUS SPORTS
Kang
Played out between two teams on the mud floor of a big out-house, fixed targets are hit with the "Kang", a flat and oblong object made of either ivory or lac. Normally each team has 7 male partners. The game is also played as a mixed-doubles contest. Played strictly during the period between ‘Cheiraoba’ and the Rath Yatra festival, Manipuris religiously adhere to its time¬frame as popular belief holds that in case the game is played outside the prescribed period, evil spirits would invade the mind of players and spectators alike.
Hiyang Tannaba (Boat Race)
Associated with religious rites, this boat race is generally held in the month of November at Thangapat and at the Loktak lake. The boat called Hiyang Hiren is believed to be invested with spiritual powers. The Meiteis believe that worship of the Hiyang Hiren will negate evil omens. The rowers wear traditional dresses and head gears. The game is also conducted during times of natural calamity.
Sagol Kangjei (Polo)
The Manipuri Sagol Kangjei has been adopted by the International Community and is now played worldwide as Polo. The 'PUYAS1 trace it to the mythological age when the game was believed to be played by the Gods. The game is played between two teams with 7 players on each side mounted on Ponies which are often not more than 4/5 feet in height. Each player is equipped with a polo stick made of cane having a narrow angled wooden head fixed at the striking end. The ball is made from bamboo root. The mounted players hit the ball into the goal. Extremely vigorous, the game is now played in two styles - the PANA or original Manipuri style and the international style as Polo. It is exhilarating to see Manipuri players in their sixties riding ponies at full gallop and playing Sagol Kangjei with gusto. The ponies are also decorated fully with various guards protecting the eyes, forehead, flanks, etc. The British learned the game of Sagol Kangjei in the 19th Century from Manipur and after refinement, it was introduced to the world as Polo.
Manipur Tourism
擊觀
上,-i.崦冬乂皱染紅.:如遽:七 
Traditional Music
Manipur is a land of music and dance. Pung, Kartal, Mangkang, Bansuri and Sembong are the soul of Manipuri Sankritana music and Classical Manipuri Dance. It assumes an important ritual character as an indispensable part of social and devotional ceremonies. Pena is a string instrument which is played by fiddling somewhat similar to the Ektara of Bengal. The tribes of the hills use a wide range of wind musical instruments made of bamboo. Puleh, Toutri, Theibe, Theiphit and Relru are some of the popular tribal musical instruments. Reuben Mashangva, a popular Tangkhul folk artist, has been successfully popularising the traditional music of the Tangkhuls.



























Native Cuisine
Manipuri cuisine is simple and healthy. Dishes are typically boiled, smoked or spicy foods that use chilli pepper. The staple diet of Manipur consists of rice, leafy vegetables, fish and meat. ‘Ngari’ or fermented fish is a popular ingredient in the dishes. ‘Umorok’,an extremely hot chilli is another favourite ingredient among the people. The meals are simple but very well prepared. One has to taste them to believe it.
Manipur Mridanga Pung Cholom 
Adventure
Adventure Tourism
A variety of Adventure Tourism facilities are available in the State. The Manipur Mountaineering and Trekking Association (MMTA), the Manipur Adventure and Allied Sports Institute (MAASI) and the Adventure Academy of Manipur are engaged in promotion of these facilities. There are numerous land, water and air based adventure sports sites across the State, such as, the Loktak lake: for water sports; the Barak river: for rafting; the Mount Iso along with Dzuko Valley famous for its endemic Dzuko Lily (Lilium chitrangadae) and the Shirui Hill famous for the rare Shirui Lily (Lilium mackliniae): for mountain climbing and trekking; the Tharon and Khangkhui Caves: for caving adventures; and the Koirengei Old Airfield and Nongmaiching foot-hills at Wakha: for hang gliding, paragliding and parasailing are some of the celebrated adventure sports and eco-tourism sites. The Adventure and Leadership Park run by the Manipur Mountaineering Institute (MMI) of the MMTA, located at Lamdan, near the Loktak Hydro-Electric Project, about 35km. from Imphal, over an area of around 250 hectares with natural rock is the first of its kind in India.




















MEDICAL TOURISM
JNIMS&RIMS Hospitals
These Government Hospitals offer tertiary healthcare services to the public. Specialists and supercialists are readily available to cater to the needs of patients. The state Government endeavours
to promote medical tourism, backed by its huge number of medical professionals, and provide world class medical facilities at very competitive and affordable prices.
Shija Hospitals and Research Institute, Langol
Shija Hospitals is an ISO 9001:2008 certified private healthcare institute in Manipur providing advanced healthcare technology with humane touch. Shija Hospitals located at environment friendly Langol is 200 bedded and has 5 modern operation theatres and 18 bedded fully functional ICU. The Hospital has becomes the only centre in Eastern India having, under one-roof, the total ‘state of the art' solution for treatment of stones at different locations of the body viz., Lap-Chole, Lap-CBD Exploration, ERCP, ESWL, PCNL, URS, CLT and Lap- Urosurgery. The Neuroscience centre has all the requisite resource in its Neurosurgery and Neurology unit. Also SHRI is today a premier institute in India for minimally invasive surgery (MIS), viz., Laparoscopic Surgery, Arthroscopy, Thoracoscopy, Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (FESS) and Upper and Lower GI Endoscopic procedures. The hospital has also been awarded Guinness World record for removing the largest neck tumor in the world from a 12 day old baby. 
HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY
The Hotel Imphal
Located in the heart of Imphal, Hotel Imphal is one of the finest hotels in the city, run and managed by the Manipur Tourism Department. The Hotel is located in a spacious environment with gardens and with all modern amenities to provide all comforts to any visiting tourist. The spacious surroundings coupled with efficient services make this hotel the perfect choice for any tourist visiting Manipur.
The Classic Hotel
The Classic Hotel, Imphal, is a three star category and an ISO 2200:2005 Certified hotel in the State. The hotel offers 59 luxurious rooms, multi-cuisine speciality restaurant, a modern fitness centre, a traditional handloom boutique, a business centre, 24-hour room service, Wi-Fi internet connectivity, spacious basement car park, concierge service, travel desk, 24-hour power back-up, doctor on call, laundry service, credit card / debit card payment facilities, electronic safety lockers, to-and-fro transport facility from the airport, taxi service, centralized air-conditioned conference and banquet facilities at its two major conference halls, a mini-conference hall, an executive board-room and many others.












































SHREE SHREE GOVINDAJI TEMPLE
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A historic Vaishnavite centre, adjoining the royal palce of Manipur's former Maharajas', the Govindajee temple is one of the more popular destination for the tourists. Twin domes, a paved courtyard, and a large raised congregation hall form a perfect backdrop for priests who descend the steps, to accept offerings from devotees in the courtyard. The shrines of Lord Krishna and Balaram and Jagannath flank the two sides of the presiding deity. Early hour Prayer (Aarti) is a must for devoted followers,
The seat of Manipur's power till 1891, the historical embodiment of Manipuri Rulers and the people of Manipur, Kangla has a special place in the hearts and minds of the people of Manipur. The old Govindajee temple, outer and inner moat and other relics are perfect reflections of the rich art and architectural heritage of Manipur.
麵.
War Cemetery



This interesting Museum near the Polo Ground, has a fairly good collection and display of Manipur’s tribal heritage and a collection of portraits of Manipur’s former rulers. Particularly interesting are the costumes, arms & ammunitions, relics and historical documents on display.

The Manipur Zoological Garden at Iroisemba is only 6 kms. on the Imphal- Kangchup Road at the foot of pine growing hillocks. Here, apart from various endangered species, tourists will have an opportunity to see the graceful brow-antlered deer (Sangai), one of the rarest endangered species of deer in the world, in sylvan surroundings.
Manipur Tourism
Khonghampat Orchidarium
Located 10 kms. from Imphal on National Highway No. 2 is a Central Orchidarium spread over 200 acres and housing over 110 rare varieties of orchids, including dozens of endemic species. The peak blooming season is March-April.
Mutua Museum
This Museum is a Cultural Complex located at Andro village, about 26 kms. from the capital. Here artifacts of
Nupi Lal Memorial Complex the State and from all over the North-East are housed,
such as pottery, rare coins, rare manuscripts of the state, The complex is a tribute to the courageous paintings, basketries, bell metals, jewelleries, wood
fighting for justice against the British on 12th different tribes and ethnic groups of the state such as
December, 1939.
27 kms. from Imphal on the Tiddim Road, is a picturesque town situated at the foot hills that rolls down to the valley. The 15th century Vishnu Temple built of peculiarly small bricks supposedly of Chinese influence during the reign of King Kiyamba is of historical importance. Bishnupur is also famous for its chiselled stoneware.
Red Hill (Lokpaching)
Red Hill is a hillock about 16 kms. from Imphal on Tiddim Road NH - 150. It is a site where British and Japanese soldiers had fought a fierce battle during World War-II. War Veterans had constructed “India Peace Memorial”,a monument in memory of Japanese soldiers who died in the battle. It is also a place of pilgrimage for Japanese tourists.
Loukoi Pat
This tiny lake located near the Tiddim Road on NH - 150 at Bishnupur is a retreat for visitors from within and outside the state. Boating facilities and the scenic beauty of the place is mesmerising for the visitors.
































Sadu Chiru Waterfall (Sadar Hills)


Kangchup (Sadar Hills)
Located 16 kms. from Imphal towards the west, is a healthy resort on the hills over-looking the Manipur valley. The scenery is picturesque and worth seeing. With the construction of Singda Dam here, the place has become one of the more popular picnic spots.
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Lake on small islands that are actually floating weeds associated with which are various aspects of life of the local inhabitants. The local dwellers live in the backdrop of the
shimmering blue waters of the Lake, labyrinthine boat routes and colourful water plants. The Sendra Tourist Home with an attached Cafeteria is a sought after tourist spot. Boating and other water sports are organised here at Takmu Water Sports Complex.
Keibul Lamjao National Park
The only floating National Park in the world, the Keibul Lamjao National Park located on the Loktak Lake is the last natural habitat of the "Sangai1 (Rucervus eldii eldii), the dancing deer of Manipur. A glimpse of the deer in this unique wetland ecosystem is a must for any wildlife enthusiast. Other wildlife to be seen include: Hog Deer, Otter, a host of water fowls and migratory birds, the latter usually sighted during November to March. The Forest Department of Manipur maintains watch towers and two rest houses within the park.














Moirang
Located 45 kms. from Imphal, and situated near the Loktak lake, this town is one of the main centres of early Meitei folk culture. An ancient temple of the pre-Hindu deity, Lord Thangjing, is situated here. In the month of May, men and women, dressed in colourful traditional costumes sing and dance in honour of the Lord at the Moirang “Lai Haraoba”,a ritual dance festival held annually. This town also has a special place in the history of India’s Freedom Struggle. It was at Moirang that the flag of the Indian National Army was first unfurled on April 14, 1944. The INA Museum which has a collection of letters, photographs, badges of ranks and other war memorabilia reminds the visitors of the noble sacrifices made by the INA soldiers under the charismatic leadership of Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose.













Khongjom War Memorial
Khongjom War Memorial, Located 36 kms. from Imphal on the Indo- Myanmar road has an important historical significane. It was here that Major General Paona Brajabashi, one of the great warriors of Manipur proved his valor against the superior might of the invading British Army in 1891. The hillock at the foot of which he laid down his life in defence of the motherland, is reminiscent of the past heroic deeds of Manipuri warriors. A war memorial has been constructed atop Kheba hill. Khongjom Day is observed every year on 23rd April here.
Kakching Garden at Uyok Ching
A beautiful artificial garden on the way to Moreh, it has many exotic native flowers, herbs, orchids, etc. and is a must-visit for any domestic or foreign tourist.
































This is a busy commercial town on the Indo-Myanmar 110 kms. from Imphal. A shopping paradise for shoppers, sundry products ranging from electronics to daily consumables are available in plenty. This place holds importance for visiting tourists not only for being a border town but also for providing a unique opportunity for experiencing the different through the neighbouring border town of Tamu which is only 5 kms. away across the border. There are numerous hotels providing accomodation at affortable prices for a comfortable stay at Moreh.

Churachandpur
It is located along the Tiddim Road, 60 kms. from Imphal and is one of the most beautiful places for sight seeing and holidaying. It is a bustling tribal town and district headquarter where products of ^ local arts and crafts stand out in the local market. Kuki-Chin-Mizo groups are the dominant tribes of this district.



Manipur Mountaineering Institute, Lamdan
Located about 44 kms. from Imphal, this Institute is the first of its kind in North East India. Adventure Sports training in Spidernet, Burma Bridge, Parasailing, Rock Climbing, Hill Trekking and many others are imparted here. The Institute is managed by the Manipur Mountaineering & Trekking Association (MMTA).
Ukhrul
Ukhrul, the highest hill station of the state is located at a distance of 83 kms. to the east of Imphal. Ukhrul is the home of a colourful warrior tribe, the Tangkhul Nagas. The Tangkgul Nagas are of the oldest major tribes of Manipur. Shirui Hills and Khangkhui Lime Caves are interesting places for excursions located in this district.
Shirui Hills These hills are also known for a unique species of land-lily, the Shirui Lily, which grows at a height of 8,500 ft. This beautiful lily which grows only in this part of the world, blooms during May-June.
TAMENGLONG DISTRICT
Tamenglong
Deep gorges, mysterious caves, splendid waterfalls and exotic orchids are what one will find in the district headquarter of Tamenglong District. The Tharon Cave, Buning Meadow, Zilad Lakes and Barak Waterfalls are some of the sought after places of tourist interest. The Rongmei, Longmei and Zemei Nagas are the dominant tribes of Tamenglong. This beautiful place is located at a distance of 156 kms. from Imphal.
SENAPATI DISTRICT
Senapati
It is the district headquarter of the northern hill district of Senapati located along the National Highway No-2. Some historical places which are unique in itself and are worth visiting are the old village of Yangkhullen, built on a steep hill; Makhel, the place where the Nagas are believed to have originated; the unexplored Haolaipai Supao Deikulu cave in Phuba Thapham; Dzuko valley; besides many others which still lay virgin, waiting to be explored. Mao, the oldest hill station in the State, is located in Senapati district on the Manipur - Nagaland border.
Dzuko Valley
It is a truly mesmerising green valley and easily the most pictureque place in Senapati District located bordering Nagaland. It is famous for the rare terrestrial lily called “ Dzuko Lily” and the enchanting snow clad valley during January & February. The highest peak of Manipur “Mount Iso” is also located behind this valley.
YELLOW PAGE

Where you should look for Handloom & Handicrafts
1. Panthoibi Manipur Emporium, Paona Bazar, Imphal ( A Government of Manipur Undertaking). Tel: 2451495
2. Kangla Emporium (M.D.S.), RIMS Road, Imphal. Tel: 2452968
3. Eastern Handloom & Handicrafts, Paona Bazar, Imphal. Tel: (M) 9856262828/8014169052
4. Ima Market, Khwairamband Bazar, Imphal.
5. Ningthibee Collections, Nagamapal, Imphal.
6. Crafts Centre, Sagolband, Imphal.
7. Emoinu Co-operative Emporium, Uripok, Imphal.
8. Wangkhei Leima Collection, Yonglan Leirak, Imphal East.
9. Rani Phi, Wangkhei Lourembam Leikai, Imphal East.
10. RKCS Art Gallery, Keisamthong,
Imphal.
http://www.rkcsartgallery.com
11. SACH, Khongman Mangjil, Imphal East.
http://www.sach-manipur.com
Where to stay
Conveniently located in the heart of the Imphal City, there are a number of Government as well as privately run hotels with all modern amenities, attentive services suited for both leisure travellers & businessmen.
1. Hotel Imphal, North AOC, Imphal (Tourism Department, Government of Manipur). Tel: 2421373/2423372
2. State Guest House, Sanjenthong, Imphal
(Government of Manipur).
Tel: 2451212
3. The Classic Hotel, North AOC,
Imphal.
Tel: 2443967/2443969 http://www.theclassichotel.in
4. Hotel Nirmala, M.G. Avenue, Imphal. Tel: 2458904/2459014
5. Hotel White Palace, M.G. Avenue, Imphal.
Tel: 2452322

8. Hotel Tampha, North AOC., Imphal. Tel: 2451486/2405479
9. Hotel Avenue, M.G. Avenue, Imphal. Tel: 2241173
10. Youth Hostel, Khuman Lampak, Imphal.
Tel: 2453422
11. State Youth Centre, YAS
Department, Government of Manipur, Khuman Lampak, Imphal.
Tel: 2320014
12. Hotel Anand Continental, Thangal Bazar, Imphal. Tel: 2449422/2449433
13. Hotel Kristina, Pologround Road, Paona Bazar. Tel: 2445255/ 2242093
14. Mass Hotel, Assembly Road,
Imphal. Tel: 2444342/ 2452797
15. Hotel Yaisana, Thangal Bazar, Imphal.
AIRLINES
AirIndia:
M.G. Avenue, Imphal, Tel :2450199
Tulihal Airport: Tel: 2455074
Jet Airways (I) Ltd.: Tel : 2455054
Indigo: Tel : 2455368/69
Kingfisher: Tel :2433013
North East Shuttle: Tel : 2455111/
09862207568
TRAVEL AGENCIES
Seven Sisters Holidays, M.G. Avenue, Majorkhul Crossing, Imphal.
Tel: 2443977/9957171551/9206188454 Pioneer Travels, B.T. Road, Imphal.
Tel: 2451248/2451997 Haokip Travel Agency,
Hotel Nirmala, MG Avenue, Imphal.
Tel: 2443044/2452772
Goodwill Travels, Thangal Bazar, Imphal.
Tel: 2450532/2450076
Seven Sisters Air Travel, M.G. Avenue.
Tel: 2445373
Pureiromba Travels, Palace Gate, Imphal. Tel: 2441211/9436038595/9862009521
Banks
All major Nationalised Banks have branches in Manipur with SBI, UBI, Axis, ICICI having ATM facilities in some of the Branch offices in Imphal.
POSTAL AND COURIER SERVICES/ TELEGRAPH
-General Post Offices, Imphal (SPEED POST) and other facilities are available.
-Blue Dart, M.G. Avenue. Tel: 2231281 -Overnite Express, Paona Bazar. Tel: 2451993 -Desk to Desk Courier, M.G. Avenue.
HOSPITALS
-Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences(JNIMS), Porompat, Imphal.
Tel: (Casualty)-2223516/2450385 -Regional Institute of Medical Sciences(RIMS), Lamphelpat, Imphal. Tel: (Casualty/
emergency) 2310478/2310411/2414478
- Shija Hospitals & Research Institute, Langol, Imphal.Tel: 2414252
- Imphal Hospital, RIMS Road, Imphal.
Tel: 2410333/2411353
-Langol View Clinic, RIMS Link Road, Imphal. Tel: 2414679/2416288
Raj Polyclinic, North AOC, Imphal.
HOW TO GET TO MANIPUR
Manipur can be reached through Airways & Roadways. Railways will be functional from 2016.
AIR COMMUNICATION
Imphal is the second largest airport in the region. Imphal is connected to Kolkata, New Delhi, Guwahati, Aizawl, Dimpaur and Silchar by Air India, Jet Airways, Indigo, Kingfisher & NE Shuttles.
ROADS
Private owned and managed deluxe coaches run daily from Imphal to Guwahati and Dimapur and back thus facilitating along the 3 National Highways viz., (1) NH-2 Via Nagaland (2) NH-37 via Silchar and (3) N.H.-150 via Mizoram crisscrossing the state and connecting all the districts.

Kolkata Manipur Bhawan
26, Rowland Road (Near Max Muller Bhawan),
Kolkata-700020, Tel: 033-24747939, 24742453 Reception: 033-24866937/24758163, Fax: 033-24542453 Guwahati: Guwahati Manipur Bhawan, Rajgarh Road,
Guwahati - 781003, Tel: 0361-2540707 Fax: 0361-451968 Imphal: Reception Counter, Imphal Airport. (Tourism Deptt. Govt. of Manipur)
CONDUCTED TOURS & TRAVEL PACKAGE
I. PIONEER TRAVELS BT ROAD, IMPHAL 795001,
MANIPUR, INDIA.
Phone: 91385-2451997, FAX: 91385-2451248, Mobile: 919856031401,919436026591 pioneertrvls@rediffmail.com, pioneertrvls@yahoo.co.in, dusarigopal@rediffmail.com TOUR CODE - VM/01 (IMPHAL-MOIRANG itinerary for 3 days/2 nights)
The itinerary is made for a group of minimum 6 (six) persons. The complete itinerary is for accommodation on twin sharing basis, fooding, sight seeing, cultural programmes (for a minimum of 21 persons), transportation and transfer from/to airport.
DAY 01: Arrival in Imphal Airport. Reception by our representative and transfer to hotel. Lunch at hotel. Afternoon visit at World War II British Cemetery in Imphal. Dinner and stay in hotel.
DAY 02: Breakfast at hotel. Proceed to INA Museum Moirang then to Loktak Lake. Further proceed to Keibul Lamjao National Park, the world's only floating park which houses the unique Sangai deer. Return to Imphal. Lunch at hotel. Visit to Ima Market and Paona International Market. Dinner and stay in hotel.
Breakfast at Hotel. Proceed to Kangla Fort, Shahid Minar and RKCS Art Gallery. Proceed to airport. TARIFF: The tariff for the complete itinerary is Rs 9,500/- per person excluding air fare.
TOUR CODE - VM/02 (IMPHAL-MOREH-MOIRANG itinerary for 4 days/3 nights)
The itinerary is made for a group of minimum 6 (six) persons. The complete itinerary is for accommodation on twin sharing basis, fooding, sight seeing, cultural programmes (for a minimum of 21 persons), transportation and transfer from/to airport.
DAY 01: Arrival in Imphal Airport. Reception by our representative and transfer to hotel. Lunch at hotel. Afternoon visit at World War II British Cemetery in Imphal. Dinner and stay in hotel.
DAY 02: Breakfast at hotel. Proceed to Moreh. Visit to Namphalong Myanmarese Market. Lunch at Moreh. Return to Imphal. Dinner and stay in hotel.
DAY 03: Breakfast at hotel. Proceed toINAMuseumMoirangthento Loktak Lake. Return toImphal. Visit to Kangla Fort, Shahid Minar, Shree Shree Govindaji Temple and RKCS Art Gallery. Further visit to Ima Market and Paona International Market. Dinner and stay in hotel.
DAY 04: Breakfast at Hotel. Proceed to. Proceed to airport.
TARIFF: The tariff for the complete itinerary is Rs 10,500/- per person excluding air fare.
TOUR CODE - VM/03 (IMPHAL-MOREH-MOIRANG itinera^ for 5 days/4 nights)
The itinerary is made for a group of minimum 6 (six) persons. The complete itinerary is for accommodation on twin sharing basis, fooding, sight seeing, cultural programmes (for a minimum of 21 persons), transportation and transfer from/to airport.
DAY 01: Arrival in Imphal Airport. Reception by our representative and transfer to hotel. Lunch at hotel. Afternoon visit at World War II British Cemetery in Imphal. Dinner and stay in hotel.
DAY 02: Breakfast at hotel. Visit to Kangla Fort, Shahid Minar and Manipur State Museum. Proceed to Moreh. Lunch at Moreh. Visit to Namphalong Myanmarese Market. Dinner and stay in Moreh. DAY 03: After breakfast, proceed to Tamu in Myanmar. After lunch, return to Imphal. Visit to RKCS Art Gallery. Dinner and stay in hotel.
DAY 04: Breakfast at hotel. Proceed to INA Museum Moirang then to Loktak Lake. Further proceed to Keibul Lamjao National Park, the world's only floating park which houses the unique Sangai deer. Return to Imphal. Lunch at hotel. Visit to Ima Market and Paona International Market..
DAY 05: Breakfast at Hotel. Visit to Nupilal Memorial Complex. Transfer to airport.
TARIFF: The tariff for the complete itinerary is Rs 12,500/- per person excluding air fare.
FOR DETAILS- PLEASE CONTACT TOUR OPERATORS



Tourist Information Centre
Manipur Information Centre
C-7 Baba Kharag Singh Marg, New Delhi - 110001
Fax: 011-23746361, Tel: 011-23746359
NEW DELHI MANIPUR BHAWANS Manipur Bhawan (Old)
2-Sardar Patel Marg, Chanakyapuri, New Delhi - 110021 Reception :011-26873311/26870103/26870122/45750800 49/50/ 26873311 Fax : 011-26111803 Bir Tikendrajit Bhawan (New)
Bir Tikendrajit Marg, Chanakyapuri, New Delhi -110021 Reception: 011-26870098/26113150

II. SEVEN SISTERS HOLIDAYS
MG AVENUE, IMPHAL 795001,
MANIPUR, INDIA.
Phone: 91385-24439^, Mobile: 919957171551,919436085741 http://www.sevensistersholidays.com, email: 7sistersholidays@gmail.com http://sevensistersholidays.com/itineraries.asp
TOUR No. 5 (Exclusive Manipur itinerary for 5 days/4 nights)
DAY 1: Arrival at IMPHAL. On arrival transfer to Hotel . Afternoon visit to Shree Shree Govindaji Temple. Overnight in Imphal
DAY 2: Day trip to Keibul Lamjao National Park, Loktak Lake, INA Memorial, Japanese War Memorial. Overnight in Imphal
DAY 3: Visit Andro Heritage Village. Afternoon local sightseeing of Imphal. Kangla Fort, Ima Market, World War II Cemetery. Overnight in Imphal
DAY 4: Day trip to Ukhrul, about 84 km kilometers to the North East of Imphal. The place is inhabited by Tangkhul Tribes. The life and art of Tangkhuls are attractive and captivating. Overnight in Imphal DAY 5: Transfer to Airport. Tour Ends.
4^
MAP OF IMPHAL (Not to scale)
ORCHID 'ijARD KHONGAMPAT
6
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於本
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LEGEND
State Boundary
District Boundary —
NoYiodol Highwoy^ —一 •
Stafe Highways
Place of Tourisf Interest 畢
Tourist Home Lodge @
lake M 
Department of Tourism
Govt, of Manipur, North AOC, Imphal

Gujrat Tourism Policy








Tourism Policy for the
State of Gujarat (2015-2020)



Industries and Mines Department Government of Gujarat September 2015









Tourism Policy for the
State of Gujarat (2015-2020)





Industries and Mines Department Government of Gujarat September 2015

Table of Contents
Page
1 Preamble 1
2 Vision, Mission & Objectives 3
3 Strategies 5
4 Policy Period & Coverage 9
5 Definitions 10
6 Incentives & Concessions 14
Capital Subsidy
Interest Subsidy
Registration/Stamp Duty Concession
Exemption from Luxury Tax
Exemption from Entertainment Tax
Exemption from Electricity Duty
Support for Sustainable Tourism
Special Package for Mega Tourism Units
Incentive for Promotion of Innovation
Support for Marketing and Promotion
Skill Development
Incentives for ICT Enablement
Assistance for Research in the Tourism/Hospitality Industry
Essential Conditions for Grant of Incentives
7 Other Initiatives 24
Development of Wayside Amenities
PPP in Tourism Projects
Homestay Policy
Tourist Police
Development Regulations for Hotels
Excellence Awards
8 Implementation Mechanism 26
Annexure A Annexure B Annexure C

1. Preamble


Tourism has evolved from just exploring new places to an opportunity for enhancing international relations, expanding business boundaries and appreciating cultural diversities. It helps bring different countries, peoples and cultures together while significantly contributing to the economic and social development.
As per the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO)“Tourism Highlights,2015” International Tourist Arrivals (ITAs) were 1,133 million in 2014 while International Tourism Receipts (ITRs) were USD 1,245 billion. The revenue share from tourism was 9% of the total GDP. Today worldwide, one in eleven jobs may be ascribed to the tourism industry.
As per the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India 2014 Report, the number of foreign tourist arrivals in India is 7.68 million and that of domestic tourist visits to all States/UTs is 1,282 million. The foreign exchange earnings from Tourism were approximately USD 20.24 billion during the same period.
The Vibrant State of Gujarat, a veritable Growth Engine of India, accounts for about six percent of the total geographical area of the Country and five percent of its population. From being a favoured port for mariners, nucleus of business and industry, cradle for culture and religion, epicentre of the Freedom Struggle, home of Mahatma Gandhi and Sardar Patel to the abode of the Asiatic lion, Gujarat is richly endowed with tourism assets.
Gujarat is bestowed with great geographical diversity, from the ethereal salt- encrusted desert to the expansive wetlands, pristine beaches to languid valleys, arid grasslands to lush forests. From Dholavira, one of the first cities in the world, to the first prototype of “Smart City” in India, Gujarat has it all. Tourists here soak in the rich cultural diversity, indulge in the various fairs and festivals, savour the cuisine and take back fond memories of their visits which they relish for a lifetime. The popular marketing campaign titled “Khushboo Gujarat Ki” has generated a lot of interest in the tourists. This has also contributed to the ever-increasing tourist flow in to the State. The same during the year 2014-15 was 32.7million which was 13.56% higher than that of the previous year.

The diversity in tourism assets is matched by a robust infrastructure base. Strategically located on the west coast of India, Gujarat is well connected to some of the major cities of the world by air and sea routes. It has one of the highest number of airports and airstrips numbering 17 in all- including an international airport at Ahmedabad. Further, with a strong port infrastructure backbone, it has some 42 ports along a 1,600 km coastline, over 5,000 km of rail network, about 77,000 km of motorable roads, 24 x 7 power supply and above all an enviable law-and-order situation. Characteristic of a buoyant economy, the State Domestic Product (SDP) growing at an average growth rate of nearly10% since 2005, is higher than the national average. Carrying forward the rich legacy of the immediate past, the State Government has embarked upon a flagship programme of Gatisheel Gujarat further fuelling all-round growth and development.
Development in this sector requires close partnerships between the governments, the private sector and communities. It is perhaps the only sector which has a very elaborate and multiple backward and forward linkages with other segments of the economy like infrastructure, transport, construction, environment, water resources, etc. Current trends and growth projections at the Global, National and State level reinforce the immense potential of tourism as a noteworthy contributor to Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and employment.

Total Contribution to GDP Employment (No in Million) Total Investment (Figures in USD Billion)
2014 2025
(Projected) 2014 2025
(Projected) 2014 2025
(Projected)

World *
9.8%
10.5%
276.85
356.91 814.4
(4.3% of total investments) 1336.4
(4.9% of total investments)

India *
6.7%
7.6%
36.70
45.57 32.42
(6.2% of total investments) 66.73
(6.9% of total investments)
Gujarat #
(Estimated) 2.7% 5% 0.95 3.00 0.81 4.00
Source: *Economic Impact, 2015 –World Travel & Tourism Council
# Existing and projected figures of Gujarat are based on the GITCO estimates.

2. Vision, Mission and Objectives



Vision
To position Gujarat as a vibrant tourist destination, with an emphasis on improving visitor experience, livelihood linkages, environmental concerns and enhancing investment opportunities, thus catapulting tourism as one of the most important economic drivers, leading to sustainable development and inclusive growth in the State.

Mission
(a) To unlock the immense untapped / under-tapped potential of tourism in the State;
(b) To develop tourism products and strengthen infrastructure;
(c) To undertake tourism-specific skill development leading to gainful employment and self-employment especially for the local populace;
(d) To preserve and upgrade environment as also to encourage responsible tourism in the State;
(e) To create an investment-friendly policy framework and suitably ensure access to requisite tourist infrastructural facilities;
(f) To showcase the infrastructure and institutions, achievements and accomplishments, entrepreneurship and hospitality of Gujarat in order to attract investments in the State and, thereby, espouse the cause of ‘Make in India’; and
(g) To focus on promotion and branding of Gujarat as a leading tourist destination the world over.

Objectives
(a) To make Gujarat one amongst the top five tourist States of India in terms of local, national and international tourist footfalls by 2025;
(b) To attract the MICE segment, by creating convention/exhibition facility and support infrastructure;
(c) To leverage innovative forms of tourism such as adventure, cruise, event-based, inland waterways, medical and others;

(d) To develop diverse tourism packages and products to augment tourist stay and encourage repeat visits;
(e) To promote tourism for all segments of the society especially facilitating senior citizens, the differently-abled, homemakers, farmers and students, by ensuring affordable accommodation and travel circuits;
(f) To provide tourism infrastructure in terms of tourist information, transport services, accommodation and way-side amenities;
(g) To enhance the use of ICT in the sector and further improve the quality of services;
(h) To upgrade skills, knowledge & professionalism and promote employment opportunities for additional two million persons by 2025;
(i) To promote responsible tourism in the State and develop tourism products in an environment-friendly manner; and
(j) To create enabling framework for public-private partnerships in developing tourism products, projects and services.

3. Strategies



Augmentation of Tourist Infrastructure
(a) Developing and providing financial support for infrastructure facilities such as civic amenities, accommodation and other tourism infrastructure;
(b) Prioritizing the development of wayside amenities along the major arterial highways of the State;
(c) Granting additional financial support for tourism development to special areas to be identified from time to time;
(d) Broadbasing the existing tourism to curtail the seasonality in tourist arrivals through;
(i) Development of facilities to support MICE in urban centres
(ii) Mega Tourism Projects in high-potential areas
(iii) Cruise Tourism along the long coastline
(iv) Water / Amusement/Theme Parks
(v) Spiritual Tourism
(vi) Coastal/ Beach Tourism
(vii) Cinematic Tourism
(viii) Khadi, Handloom, Handicraft and Textile Tourism
(ix) Archaeological and Historical Tourism
(x) Geo-tourism
(xi) Eco and Wildlife Tourism
(xii) Adventure Tourism and Water Sports
(xiii) Wellness and Medical Tourism
(xiv) Rural Tourism
(xv) Educational Tourism
(xvi) Cuisine Tourism
(xvii) Industrial Tourism
(These themes have been further detailed at Annexure A).
(e) Improvement of regional air connectivity, on PPP mode, by opening new air strips and facilitating the commencement / strengthening of air

operations at major tourist destinations (to be undertaken by GUJSAIL in consultation with the Ministry of Civil Aviation, GoI); and
(f) Financial assistance / support to women entrepreneurs, the differently- abled and SC/ST groups.

Tourist-centric Approach
(a) Improving tourist safety and security at all tourist destinations through schemes like Tourist Wardens, 24 x 7 Centralized Helpline, etc;
(b) Improving the experience of young travellers by provision of crèches and play areas;
(c) Adopting a multilingual approach towards promotion through publicity material, collaterals, guide training, etc;
(d) Improving access for the differently-abled, the infirm and the aged through provision of ramps, escalators and other forms of assisted access to various tourist attractions;
(e) Developing the tourist circuits (indicative list appended at Annexure A) in a phased manner;
(f) Promoting experiential tourism by showcasing and promoting various fairs and festivals (indicative list appended at Annexure B), living traditions, local customs, cuisines, etc;
(g) Evolving a system of taking regular feedback from various stakeholders in general and a cross-section of the tourists in particular; and
(h) Strengthening of the Grievance-Redressal Mechanism.


Skill Development & Employment Generation
(a) Development of and tie-up with world-class training institutes;
(b) Training and certification (both short and long term) shall be imparted to guides, hospitality staff, including home-stay hosts, tour operators, etc. from time to time;
(c) Reimbursement of course fee for identified training programmes;
(d) Financial support by way of monthly stipend to qualified tourist guides; &
(e) Generation of gainful employment and facilitation in self-employment for the local trained people as also for the artisans, craftsmen and others.

Promotion of ‘Make in India’ and ‘Digital India’
(a) Various concessions and incentives have been provided to the hospitality sector in the Tourism Policy to attract investments, both national and international, to help realize the goals of “Make in India”;
(b) An enabling mechanism will be put in place to ensure facilitation for investment in the tourism sector through this Policy, over and above the provisions under ‘Gujarat Industrial Policy - 2015’;
(c) Special incentives for adopting ICT in the tourism sector will be offered to the investors;
(d) Promoting ICT-enabled technologies through mobile applications, social networking, big data analytics, blogs, virtual tourism, etc;
(e) Major tourism sites may be duly equipped with CCTV cameras, WiFi services and mobile-based services to the extent possible so as to ensure tourist safety and security as also to enhance public convenience; and
(f) Promotion and marketing initiatives shall be further strengthened.


Thrust on Environment-Friendliness, Sanitation and Cleanliness
(a) Undertaking concerted activities under “Swachh Bharat” and “Swachh Gujarat”;
(b) Adopting the “Sustainable Tourism Criteria for India” for the tour operators and hoteliers as laid down by the Ministry of Tourism (MoT), Government of India. Sensitization for stakeholders shall be undertaken by means of workshops, conferences, events, etc;
(c) Lending financial support to encourage green projects by tourism units through bio-toilets, pollution control measures, solid/liquid waste management, energy efficiency measures, etc; and
(d) Augmenting construction of public conveniences and maintaining cleanliness, preferably through public participation or on PPP mode.

Emphasis on Innovation
(a) Provision of special financial assistance including promotion and marketing support to innovative tourism projects; and
(b) Institution of “Excellence Awards” to, inter alia, incentivize innovation.

Participation in GoI Schemes
Emphasis on active participation in GoI schemes like Swadesh Darshan, PRASAD, HRIDAY, AMRUT, LRGP and other schemes as may be declared from time to time.

Active Collaboration with the Central Government
Tourism development needs multi-departmental coordination. The State Government will actively collaborate with MoT, MoUD, MoC, MoEF, ASI and other GoI Ministries / Organizations.

Multi-pronged Approach for Ease of Doing Business
(a) Partnership would be further strengthened with Government of India, other State Governments and the private stakeholders of the tourism industry;
(b) Coordination will be ensured amongst all the concerned Departments, for the smooth and efficient implementation of the Tourism Policy;
(c) Adoption of a feedback-based approach to further improve visitors’ experience;
(d) Constitution of State-Level Empowered Committee (SLEC) to help remove impediments and procedural bottle-necks; and
(e) Strengthening of Single-Window Clearance Cell in the Commissionerate of Tourism (CoT).
Proactive Role of the State Government

Apart from being an effective facilitator, the State Government shall be leading from the front in matters like Destination Development, Promotion of Fairs and Festivals, Publicity Campaigns, IT Initiatives, Market Research, Exhibition and Seminars, Skill Development, etc.

4. Policy Period & Coverage



Operative Period
This Policy shall come into force with effect from the date of issuance of the Policy GR and shall remain in force till 31stMarch 2020 or till the declaration of a new or revised Policy, whichever is earlier. This Policy will supersede any GR/Circular (issued earlier) in contravention of the provisions of this Policy.

Coverage Area of the Policy
The Policy is applicable to the whole of the State of Gujarat.

5. Definitions



Tourism Unit
Tourism Unit means a legal entity under the relevant law, engaged or to be engaged in providing any service related to travel and tourism. Following units would be considered as Tourism Units:
(a) Hotels (One-Star to Five-Star Deluxe)
(b) Heritage Hotels
(c) Apartment Hotels
(d) Motels
(e) Convention Centres
(f) Resorts
(g) Tented Accommodation
(h) Tourism & Hospitality Training Institutes
(i) Amusement Parks/ Water Parks /Theme Parks
(j) Adventure Sports
(k) Wayside Amenities


New Tourism Unit
A 'New Tourism Unit' means a Tourism Unit which is set up and which commences commercial operations during the operative period of this Policy.

Existing Tourism Unit Undergoing Expansion
Existing Tourism Unit taking up expansion of more than fifty percent of its existing capacities (e.g. Rooms/Rides/Tents, etc.)
Only one expansion project (commencing commercial operations within the Policy Period) of an existing tourism unit will be eligible for assistance during the operative period of the Policy.

Commercial Operations
Date of Commercial Operations of a Tourism Unit is the date on which the Tourism Unit is open to tourists on a commercial basis, after due testing, trial running and commissioning under relevant Government rules.

Eligible Tourism Unit
New Tourism Unit and Existing Tourism Unit Undergoing Expansion during the operative period of this Policy would be considered as Eligible Tourism Units.

Tourism Service Provider
Any partnership firm or private limited company or public limited company or corporation duly registered under law and providing any service related to travel and tourism including Travel Agents, Transport Operators, Ticketing Agents, Tourist Guide Service Providers and Home-stay Owners.

Hotel
Hotel projects should have facilities expected of establishments in the one to five star categories as per the prevailing Guidelines of Hotels laid down by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India. Such hotels should also obtain necessary category certification from the competent authority.

Heritage Hotel
‘Heritage Hotel’ means a hotel run in a fort, fortress, palace, haveli, castle, hunting lodge or residence with heritage features, built prior to January 1950 and approved by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India. Such Heritage Hotels should also obtain necessary category certification from the competent authority.

Apartment Hotel
Apartment Hotel projects should have facilities as per the prevailing Guidelines for Apartment Hotels laid down by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India. Such Apartment Hotels should also obtain necessary category certification from the competent authority.

Motel
Motel projects should have facilities conforming to the prevailing Guidelines for Motels laid down by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India. Such Motels should also obtain necessary category certification from the competent authority.

Convention Centre
Convention Centre should have facilities as per the prevailing Guidelines for Convention Centre as laid down by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India. Such Convention Centre should also obtain necessary category certification from the competent authority.
Resort
Resort projects should be of three-star category or above having facilities as per the prevailing Guidelines of Ministry of Tourism, Government of India. Such Resorts should also obtain necessary category certification from the competent authority.
Tented Accommodation
Tented Accommodation projects should have facilities as per the prevailing Guidelines for Tented Accommodation as laid down by the Ministry of Tourism, Government of India. Such Tented Accommodation should also obtain necessary category certification from the competent authority.
Tourism & Hospitality Training Institute
The Institute must be offering tourism/hospitality courses that are recognized/certified by regulatory authorities.

Mega Tourism Unit
Projects capable of creating new employment of more than 150 persons with new investment of Rs. 75 crores and above (excluding the cost of land) will be construed as Mega Tourism Units. Units which are set up and which commence commercial operations during the operative period of this Policy will only be eligible under this category. The proposals of Mega Tourism Units would require due approval of the State-Level Empowered Committee (SLEC).
Hotels and Resorts, Multiplexes and Malls shall be excluded from the definition of Mega Tourism Unit.
Amusement Park
Amusement Park should have entertainment facilities such as rides, games, etc built over a minimum plot area of 40,000 sq.m.(about 10 acres). Stand-

alone commercial multiplexes shall not be treated as Amusement Parks.

Water Park
Water Park should have a minimum of three water slides with a plot area of at least 20,000 sq.m. (about 5 acres) and a capacity to handle at least 100 sliders simultaneously.

Theme Park
Theme Park should be based on a single or series of themes having a plot measuring at least 10,000 sq.m. (about 2.5 acres). It may have amusement rides, water slides, accommodation (at least ten lettable rooms), restaurant, theatre, shopping area, activity area and theme areas. It is, however, not mandatory to have all these features.
The projects under para 5.16, 5.17 and 5.18, if meeting the criteria of employment and investment as per the Mega Tourism units (as per para 5.15) would be entitled to benefits as such under the Policy.

Adventure Sports
Adventure Sports should have the requisite infrastructure, equipment and trained staff, along with appropriate safety-and-rescue set-up, that will provide tourists with an opportunity to undertake permissible adventure and suchother activities like mountaineering, river rafting, etc. All requisite permissions from various Competent Authorities as also a comprehensive insurance cover will have to be obtained beforehand.

Wayside Amenities
Wayside amenities would be a complex comprising resting areas, toilets, cafeteria, shops, first-aid facility, parking, souvenir booths, etc located on National/State Highways and Other District Roads. It is, however, not mandatory to have all these features. Detailed guidelines in this regard will be issued hereafter.

6. Incentives and Concessions


The State Government grants the status of Industry to the Tourism Sector. While the orders regarding grant of concessions/incentives to the tourism projects as a result of the declaration of Tourism as an Industry will be issued separately, the following incentives / concessions have been provided for under this Policy:

Capital Subsidy to the Eligible Tourism Units
(a) Quantum of Capital Investment subsidy

Eligible Capital Investment (excluding the land cost) Admissible Subsidy* Maximum Limit
Investment upto Rs.50 crore 15% Rs. 7.50 crore
Investment above Rs. 50 crore 15% Rs. 10 crore
Tented accommodation
(with minimum investment of Rs.0.20 crore) 20% Rs. 0.15 crore
Equipment worth Rs.1 crore and above for Adventure & Water Sports and Golf Equipment for Public Golf Courses registered with TCGL 10% Rs.0.50 crore
* As percentage of Eligible Capital Investment
(b) Additional Capital Subsidy of 5% will be provided to following:-
(i) New Tourism Units coming up within the Corporation limits of Gandhinagar (State Capital) and also adjoining areas falling within the radius of 20 kms but within the District of Gandhinagar.
(ii) New Tourism Units at Yatra Dhams such as Ambaji, Dwarka, Dakor, Junagadh, Somnath, Palitana and such other places as may be recommended by GPYVB and approved by the State Government from time to time.

(iii) New Tourism Units at Eco-tourism Centres of Gujarat including Nalsarovar, Polo, Dangs, Jambughoda and such other places as may be notified by the State Government from time to time.
(iv) New Tourism Units owned and managed by women entrepreneurs (with minimum equity participation of 51% in the entity) and those belonging to SC/ST categories as also the differently-abled will be entitled to an additional 5% subsidy over and above the ‘Admissible Subsidy’.
(v) In all the above-mentioned cases, the total subsidy available will be subject to the ceiling prescribed under ‘Maximum Limit’.
(c) Eligible Capital Investment
The term Eligible Capital Investment shall include expenditure components as per the guidelines of MoT, GoI for the relevant Tourism Unit.
However, the following heads of investments in respect of the unit shall not be eligible for incentives:
(i) Working Capital;
(ii) Pre-operative expenses and preliminary expenses;
(iii) Second-hand plant and machinery purchased or shifted from within or outside country;
(iv) Interest capitalized;
(v) Consumable stores, inventories for maintenance or repairs;
(vi) Investment on land required for setting up the Unit, inclusive of the cost of the land;
(vii) Vehicles, furniture and fixtures, cutlery, crockery and utensils; &
(viii) Any construction which is in the nature of real estate transactions, e.g., shops, flats, offices, etc. meant for sale / lease / rent.

Interest Subsidy to the Eligible Tourism Units
(a) Quantum of Interest Subsidy
(i) @5% of the Loan Amount with maximum amount of Rs.25 lakhs per annum for a period of five years in Municipal Corporation areas for eligible tourism units.

(ii) @7% of the Loan Amount with maximum amount of Rs.30 lakhs per annum for a period of five years in the areas other than mentioned above.
(b) Interest Subsidy for Heritage Hotels
@7% of the loan amount with maximum amount of Rs.30 lakhs per annum for a period of five years.
Conditions for Interest Subsidy will be separately notified.


Registration / Stamp Duty Concession
Eligible Tourism Units will qualify for 100% reimbursement of Stamp Duty and Registration Fee on sale/lease/transfer of land for the first transaction only during the operative period of this Policy. Reimbursement of Stamp Duty and Registration Fee would be made after the date of commencement of commercial operations.

Exemption from Luxury Tax
The exemption from Luxury Tax will be applicable to Eligible Tourism Units for a period of five years from the date of commencement of commercial operations or the date of completion of expansion. The unit availing the exemption benefit under this category shall have to pass on the same to the end user. The incentive will be reviewed when GST is introduced.

Exemption from Entertainment Tax
The exemption from Entertainment Tax will be applicable to Eligible Tourism Units for a period of five years from the date of commencement of commercial operations or the date of completion of expansion. The unit availing the exemption benefit under this category shall have to pass on the same to the end user. The incentive will be reviewed when GST is introduced.

Exemption from Electricity Duty
There will be complete exemption from paying Electricity Duty for a period of five years from the date of commencement of commercial operations for New Tourism Units only. For existing units, the Electricity Duty shall be charged as

per Industry Rates and the same will be applicable with effect from the date of appropriate notification in this regard by the State Government.

Support for Sustainable Tourism
Assistance will be extended to eligible tourism units up to 75% of the cost of carrying out Energy Audit by a recognized institution/consultant, Water Harvesting / Conservation and Environment-friendly practices like Green Buildings, Solar and other Renewable Energy measures, to a maximum token amount of Rs 50,000 per unit. It shall be disbursed once during the operative period of the Policy. Moreover such units will be accorded special recognition by the State Government.

Special Package for Mega Tourism Units
The State Government shall duly promote and facilitate Mega Tourism Projects that have a large multiplier effect on the economy, leading to employment generation and inclusive growth in the State. Any type of Mega Tourism Units like Theme Parks, Amusement Parks, Water Parks, etc. meeting the qualifying criteria of Mega Tourism Units will be eligible. Following incentives would be offered to Eligible Mega Tourism Units:
(a) 100% reimbursement of Stamp Duty and Registration Fee on sale/lease/transfer of land for the first transaction only during the operative period of this Policy. Reimbursement of Stamp Duty and Registration Fee would be done after the commencement of commercial operations.
(b) Capital Subsidy of 15% of Eligible Capital Investm